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REVISED WORK PLAN 



Massachusetts Military Reservation 
Training Range and Impact Area 

Small Arms Berm Maintenance 
Removal of Metallic Lead and Fixation of Leachable Lead 



Prepared for 

NATIONAL GUARD BUREAU 
ARLINGTON, VIRGINIA 

pursuant to 

THE UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY, REGION I 

Administrative Order SDWA 1-97-1030 



Prepared By: 

Ogden Environmental and Energy Services Co., Inc. 

Supervising Contractor 

Westford, MA 

and 

Sevenson Environmental Services, Inc. 

Treatment Contractor 

Munster, IN 



January 14, 1998 




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DEPARTMENTS OF THE ARMY AND THE AIR FORCE 

NATIONAL GUARD BUREAU 

111 SOUTH GEORGE MASON DRIVE 

ARLINGTON, VA 22204-1382 

January 14, 1998 




Environmental Programs 
Directorate 



Mr. Michael Jasinski 

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 

Office of Site Remediation and Restoration 

JFK Federal Building (HBT) 

Boston, Massachusetts 02203-0001 

Dear Mr. Jasinski: 

With this correspondence the National Guard Bureau (NGB) is 
submitting its revised Work Plan for the Massachusetts Military 
Reservation Training Range and Impact Area - Small Arms Bern 
Maintenance, Removal of Metallic Lead and Fixation of Leachable 
Lead. First, I would like to take this opportunity to thank you 
and everyone at EPA who have worked so diligently with NGB as we 
have worked through the difficult issues surrounding this 
project. 

Not withstanding our differences, NGB and EPA have been able 
to reach an agreement on this revised Work Plan. This is 
indicative of the desire of both agencies to respond to the 
issues at MMR. While it is not necessary at this time to 
articulate our differences in detail, NGB is required to respond 
to certain points raised in EPA' s 24 December 1997 letter on 
Conditional Approval of the Draft Work Plan: 

■ NGB will process all soils selected to 5.0 mg/1 of leachable 
lead. It is impracticable for NGB to guarantee that no 
discharge of any type will ever occur from the replacing of 
the processed soils back on the berms . If a release occurs NGB 
will address such release in accordance with applicable laws 
and regulations . 

■ In NGB's view, the berm maintenance project does not trigger 
hazardous waste regulations. As noted in your letter, NGB 
contends that the hazardous waste land disposal restrictions 
do not apply to this project, either currently or as proposed 
for revision. 



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-2- 



Other Metals - Although there is no requirement under the 
revised Administrative Order (revised and signed July 25, 
1997) to test for the other metals mentioned in EPA' s 
comments, NGB will test for such metals in addition to lead as 
a good management practice. NGB will address the release of 
such metals, if any, under applicable laws and regulations. 



The ultimate goal of both of our agencies is to ensure that 
human health and safety will be fully protected at MMR while 
maintaining the military readiness necessary for national 
defense. It is our belief that this project, as detailed in the 
revised Work Plan being submitted to you today will further this 
goal to the satisfaction of all concerned. NGB and the 
Massachusetts National Guard will proceed with the lead removal 
work by January 30 th , as specified in EPA' s conditional approval 
letter. If you have any questions or concerns, please feel free 
to contact me at (703) 607-7432 regarding technical issues or Mr 
Randy Chambers at (703) 614-6230 regarding legal issues. 

Sincerely , 




Richard O. Murphy 

Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Army 

NGB Project Coordinator 



/ 



REVISED WORK PLAN 



Massachusetts Military Reservation 
Training Range and Impact Area 

Small Arms Berm Maintenance 
Removal of Metallic Lead and Fixation of Leachable Lead 



Prepared for 

NATIONAL GUARD BUREAU 
ARLINGTON, VIRGINIA 

pursuant to 

THE UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY, REGION 

Administrative Order SDWA 1-97-1030 



Prepared By: 

Ogden Environmental and Energy Services Co., Inc. 

Supervising Contractor 

Westford, MA 

and 

Sevenson Environmental Services, Inc. 

Treatment Contractor 

Munster, IN 



January 14, 1998 



Disclaimer: This document had been prepared pursuant to a government administrative 
order (U.S. EPA Region I SDWA Docket No. 1030) and is subject to approval by the 
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The opinions, findings, and conclusions 
expressed are those of the authors and not those of the U.S. Environmental Protection 
Agency. 



. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



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http://archive.org/details/revisedworkplanmOOunse 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 



SECTION 


1.0 




1.1 




1.2 




1.3 




1.4 


SECTION 


2.0 




2.1 




2.2 



2.3 
2.4 
2.5 
2.6 
2.7 

2.8 
2.9 



2.10 
2.11 

2.12 
2.13 



INTRODUCTION 1 - 1 

SITE DESCRIPTION 1 - 1 

TASK OBJECTIVES 1 - 2 

PROJECT TEAM ORGANIZATION 1 - 2 

MAECTITE® TECHNOLOGY DISCUSSION 1 - 8 

SITE MANAGEMENT PLAN 2 - 1 

MOBILIZATION AND DEMOBILIZATION PROCEDURES 2 - 2 

SITE SETUP 2 - 2 

2.2.1 Support Areas 2-2 

2.2.2 Site Support Facilities 2-3 
EXCAVATION OF BERM SOILS 2-3 
SCREENING OF BERM SOILS 2 - 4 
EX SITU MAECTITE® PROCESSING 2 - 4 
IN SITU MAECTITE® PROCESSING 2-6 
SITE LAYOUT AND TREATMENT SYSTEM 2 - 6 
CONFIGURATION 

SITE ACTIVITY FLOW CHART 2 - 7 

PROJECT EQUIPMENT 2 - 7 

2.9.1 Equipment List and Functions 2-7 

2.9.2 Preventative Maintenance 2-11 
EROSION AND DUST CONTROL 2-11 
PERSONNEL AND EQUIPMENT DECONTAMINATION 2-12 
AREAS 

WINTER OPERATION MEASURES 2 - 12 

SITE SECURITY AND ACCESS 2-13 



I 



§ 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

SECTION 3.0 FIELD SAMPLING AND ANALYTICAL PLANS 3 - 1 

3.1 PRE-EXCAVATION SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS PLAN 3 - 1 

3.1.1 Introduction 3-1 

3.1.2 Background 3-1 

3.1.3 Performance Specifications 3-4 

3.1 .4 General Range Assessment Plan for the Evaluation 3-4 
of the Extent of Recoverable and Potentially 
Leachable Lead 

3.2 TREATED MATERIAL SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS PLAN 3-11 

3.2.1 Sampling Objective(s): Sampling Frequency 3-11 
Requirements 

3.2.2 Data Quality Objectives 3-12 

3.2.3 Analytical Sources (off-site laboratory) 3-14 

3.2.4 Sampling Procedures 3-15 

3.2.5 Sampling Equipment and Containers 3-16 

3.2.6 Analytical Data Turn Around Time 3-17 

3.2.7 Record Keeping and Reporting Procedures 3-17 

3.2.8 Sample handling, Storage and Shipment 3-18 

3.2.9 Subcontract Laboratories 3-19 

3.2.10 Reprocess, Resample and Reanalyze 3-19 



SECTION 4.0 OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE PLAN 



4-1 



SECTION 5.0 



QUALITY ASSURANCE PROJECT PLANS 5 - 1 

Sevenson Environmental Services, Inc. (QA Project Plan) 
Waste Stream Technology, Inc. (QA/QC Plan) 



SECTION 6.0 HEALTH AND SAFETY PLAN 



6-1 



I 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



SECTION 7.0 LEAD PROCESSING AND DISPOSITION PLAN 



7-1 



SECTION 8.0 INTERFACE AND DATA SHARING PLAN 



8-1 



SECTION 9.0 PROJECT SCHEDULES 



9-1 



SECTION 1 0.0 DAILY PRODUCTION REPORT PLAN 



10-1 



SECTION 1 1 .0 MAECTITE® TREATABILITY STUDY RESULTS 

FOR MMR 



11 -1 



FIGURES 



Figure 1-1 Project Team Organization 
Figure 1-2 Training Range Identification 
Figure 2-1 Process Equipment Layout 

Figure 3-1 Evaluation and Processing of Berm & Near Berm Soils 
at Range "X" 



1 - 3 
1 - 4 

2- 5 

3- 10 



TABLES 



Table 1-1 Small Arms Range Descriptions 
Table 3-1 Performance Specifications 
Table 3-2 Sampling Frequency 



1 - 5 
3-11 
3 - 12 



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1.0 INTRODUCTION 

1.1 SITE DESCRIPTION 

The Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR) is located on the upper Cape Cod, 
approximately 60 miles southeast of Boston, MA. The base itself was constructed in 1935, 
although the area had seen use for military purposes on and off since 1911. Heaviest 
activity was during 1940-1946, in support of forces involved in World War 2, and 1955- 
1972, at the height of the Cold War. 

The MMR currently houses the operations of several U.S. federal agencies, 
including the U.S. Air Force, the U.S. Army, the U.S. Coast Guard, the U.S. Marines, and 
the Veterans Administration. The 21,000 acre Facility is divided into three main areas: (1) 
a 5,000 acre cantonment in the southern portion, which houses Otis Air Force Base, 
vehicle personnel housing, maintenance facilities, Coast Guard operations, etc., (2) a 750 
acre Veterans Administration cemetery along the Western edge, and (3) the 14,000 acre 
northern portion which houses Air Force radar facilities, space for Army National Guard 
and Army Reserve training maneuvers, and numerous ranges which surround the no 
access "Impact Zone". Local law enforcement agencies also use the facility for training. 

The ranges at MMR include most of the types used for military and law enforcement 
training; a 10 meter machine gun, 25 meter combat pistol certification, record fire, sniper 
training, demolition charge training, mortars, hand grenades, etc. Lead in the sandy berm 
soils at 16 of the ranges employed for training with small arms (pistols and rifles) and 
machine guns is the subject of this project. Figure 1-2 provides the location of Impact Area 
and the ranges to be addressed by this program. Table 1-1 provides a summary of the 
subject ranges for this program including name, number of firing positions, age, size, and 
weapons fired. 



Page 1 - 1 



Typically, munitions employed at these ranges includes small arms rounds 
(5.56mm, 7.62mm, and 9 mm) and some larger rounds, such as 50 caliber machine gun. 
These munitions often employed a lead core wrapped in a metal alloy jacket. Metals 
employed included lead, copper, iron, nickel, and antimony. Rounds fired from shooting 
stations at targets are stopped when they impact an earthen backstop, or berm. Projectiles 
often fragmenting upon impact, producing an array of sizes of metal residuals from 
complete slugs to microscopic fines in the sandy soils of the berm and areas nearby. 
There is concern that some of the metals, such as lead, may have the potential for 
leaching into local ground water. Additional background information is provided in Section 
3.1.2. The National Guard Bureau has been tasked with the responsibility for operating 
and maintaining the MMR, and therefore has the responsibility for managing metals 
introduced to range soils by training operations. 

1.2 TASK OBJECTIVES 

This Work Plan has been prepared to address the requirements to provide the 
necessary personnel, equipment and materials to first remove any lead fragments that will 
not pass a No. 4 screen and second, chemically treat the leachable lead in all the 
remaining soils to TCLP levels of 5.0 mg/l or less from the range berms at the 16 bermed 
small arms ranges at the MMR Training Range and Impact Area. All work will be 
conducted in accordance with the EPA Region I Administrative Order SDWA 1-97-1030. 

1 .3 PROJECT TEAM ORGANIZATION 

The team assembled for this project and general reporting relationships are highlighted in 
Figure 1-1. 



Page 1 - 2 



f 



EPA Region I 

Technical Project 
Coordinator 



National Guard Bureau 

Massachusetts National Guard 

Project Coordinator 



Ogden Environmental 
Supervising Contractor 



Project 
Manager 



Sevenson Environmental 
Services Treatment Contractor 



Project 
Superintendent 



Health and 
Safety Officer 



QA/QC 
Director 



Impact Area 
Review Team 



Program 
Manager 



Project 
Manager 



Field 
Oversight 



Treatment Foreman 
Project Chemist 
Equipment Operators (4) 
Cleanup Technicians/Laborers (4) 



• 



Figure 1-1 

Project Team Organization 



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Table 1-1 
Small Arms Range Descriptions 



Range 


Firing 
Positions 


Year 
Built 


Size 
(FP to Targets) 


Weapons Fired 


A 


4 


1977 


300 meters 


.50 cal MG 


B 


55 


1962 


25 meters 


M16 rifle (5.56 mm) 
9mm pistol 


C 


55 


1962 


25 meters 


M16 rifle (5.56 mm) 
9mm/.45 cal pistol 


D 


8 


1977 


1 meters 


M60 MG (7.62mm) 


E 


12 


1977 


25 meters 


.30 - .45 cal pistol 
12 gauge shotgun 


F 

(See I) 










G 


27 


1965 


1 meters 
25 meters 


M16 rifle (5.56mm) 

M60 MG (7.62mm) 

.380 - .45 cal pistol 

1 2 gauge shotgun 


H 


25 


1965 


1 meters 
25 meters 


M16 rifle (5.56mm) 

M60 MG (7.62mm) 

.38 - .45 cal pistol 

AK47 rifle 

(7.62mm) 

1 2 gauge shotgun 


I 
(Formerly 
Range F) 


27 


1977 


25 meters 


M16 rifle (5.56mm) 

.357 - .45 cal pistol 

1 2 gauge shotgun 


J 


18 


1941 


25 meters 


Ml 6 rifle (5.56mm) 
.30 - .45 cal pistol 
1 2 gauge shotgun 


K 


26 


1977 


25 meters 


M16 rifle (5.56mm) 

.22 - .45 cal pistol 

1 2 gauge shotgun 

AR15 rifle (.223 cal) 

9mm SMG 

3030 rifle 



Table 1-1 
Small Arms Range Descriptions 



Range 


Firing 
Positions 


Year 
Built 


Size 
(FP to Targets) 


Weapons Fired 


KD 


15 

1 


1941 


25,100,200, 
300 meters 


M16 rifle (5.56mm) 

M60 MG (7.62mm) 

.308 - .357 rifle 

.38&.45 cal pistol 

9mm UZI SMG 

M6 SIG (5.56mm) 

Ml 18 (7.62mm) 

1 2 gauge shotgun 

M31 (14.5mm) 
40mm Cannon 

90mm 

TOW 


M 

(No 

longer 

exists) 










N 


55 


1949 


25 meters 


Ml 6 rifle (5.56mm) 

.357 - .45 cal pistol 

1 2 gauge shotgun 





10 


1977 


25 meters 
50 meters 


.30 - .45 cal pistol 

9mm SMG 

M60 rifle (7.62mm) 

.223 rifle 

1 2 gauge shotgun 


P 


26 


1949 


25 meters 


M16 rifle (5.56mm) 
.35 - .45 cal pistol 
1 2 gauge shotguns 


SE 


5 


1977 


100,200,300, 
400, 450, 500, 
550, 600, 650, 
700, 750, 800 
meters 


M16 rifle (5.56mm) 

M60 MG (7.62mm) 

9mm rifle 


SW 


5 


1977 


100,200,300, 
400, 450, 500, 
550, 600, 650, 
700, 750, 800 
meters 


M16 rifle (5.56mm) 
M60 MG (7.62mm) 



• 



• 



' 



Table 1-1 
Small Arms Range Descriptions 



Reference for Age: Mr. Walter Tyler and Cpt. Charles Cody, MMR Facilities 

Engineering, Data provided on 1 0/22/97 from Camp Edwards ARNG 

Facilities Inventory & Stationary Plan (FISP). 
Reference for Size: Sgt. Charlie Tenney MMR Range Control (10/21/97 

telephone discussion) 
Reference for Weapons Fired Column: Draft Range Use History Report, Table 4- 

3 Rifle Range Utilization (Prepared by Ogden) 



1 .4 MAECTITE® TECHNOLOGY DISCUSSION 

The technology proposed by Sevenson to eliminate the leachability of lead in range 
soils at the Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR) is the patented MAECTITE® 
process technology. MAECTITE®, as recommended for this project, is a flexible, 
continuous process consisting of both the ex situ addition and mixing of MAECTITE® liquid 
reagent (proprietary) with the range soils in an ex-situ processing system and the in-situ 
application of the MAECTITE® liquid reagent. 

Sevenson will obtain samples of the material from the range berms prior to 
mobilization to the site. Samples will be sent to Waste Stream Technology, Inc. in Buffalo, 
New York (a wholly owned subsidiary). Treatability studies will be performed on the 
material to determine appropriate dose additions of each chemical for full scale 
implementation. The treatability study results are included as Section 1 1 .0. 

The end product after MAECTITE® chemical treatment is of a consistency similar 
to the untreated material. Moisture content may be slightly higher, but the end product will 
not contain free liquids, and it will become drier as curing proceeds. In addition, chemical 
processing by the MAECTITE® process has typically resulted in volume reduction as 
measured prior to mechanical compaction from heavy earthmoving equipment. The end 
product will pass EPA Method SW-846 (TCLP leachable metals).. 

MAECTITE® processing is rapid, requiring only 3-5 hours to cure prior to sampling 
for confirmatory testing. Longer curing is preferred if evaporative dehydration of the 
material is desirable for the purpose of reducing the mass of the processed material or if 
sub-zero temperatures are encountered. Material formerly containing TCLP leachable lead 
concentrations above 5.0 mg/L that is processed by the MAECTITE® process is converted 
to a non-hazardous material, in compliance with the hazardous characteristic definition in 
RCRA (< 5.0 mg/l TCLP lead). 



Page 1 - 8 



Sevenson's ex situ process equipment for this project will consist of a screening 
plant for lead recovery, a conveyor for material feed and a pugmill. The pugmill unit will 
contain a weight belt feeder that integrates the MAECTITE® liquid reagent feed system. 

The process system begins by berm soils being loaded into the screening plant and 
pass through a shredder for sizing. The material will then be screened with a 2" bar screen 
for oversized material and then through a No.4 screen prior to discharge directly into the 
pugmill hopper. The 2" material rejected will be treated by spraying with MAECTITE® 
while the lead fragments collected by the No.4 screen will be stockpiled and removed from 
the site by MANG. Once the material enters the pugmill hopper it will be conveyed over 
a weight belt for feed rate measurement and control. The material will then be delivered 
to the pugmill mixing unit for blending with MAECTITE® reagents and water. The pugmill 
will discharge the material where it will be stockpiled pending confirmatory sampling and 
analysis. 

Sevenson's in-situ process equipment will include a chemical feed pump, a portable 
tank for MAECTITE® reagents and a water truck. The MAECTITE® reagent will be applied 
to a predetermined area and blended into the soils. In the ex-situ application of the 
technology, the pugmill will blend the reagents into the soils. In the in-situ application, an 
excavator will be utilized to blend the reagents and soils. 

Sevenson will retreat any soil material that fails the performance criteria for this 
project. Sevenson does not anticipate any failed treatment lots. However, treated piles 
will be staged to allow adequate equipment access in the unlikely event retreatment is 
necessary. Processing production for the project are expected average approximately 400- 
800 tons per day. 



Page 1 - 9 



2.0 SITE MANAGEMENT PLAN 

The Massachusetts Military Reservation project will consist of: 

► Mobilization 

► Range specific berm characterization 

► Site and MAECTITE® process system setup 

► Mobile lab utilization for treatment system control and characterization 

► Excavation of berm materials as determined from range specific 
characterization 

► Screening of range soils through a No.4 screen to collect recoverable lead 

► Ex-situ application of the MAECTITE® process at full-scale production 

► In-situ application of the MAECTITE® process at full-scale production 

► Confirmatory testing for Total and TCLP lead in treated material 

► Equipment and personnel decontamination 

► Berm restoration 

► Demobilization 



Page 2 - 1 



Detailed discussions on each item listed above will be outlined in the various sections of 
this work plan. All project activity will be conducted in accordance with this work plan. 

2.1 MOBILIZATION AND DEMOBILIZATION PROCEDURES 

The Contractors will mobilize personnel and equipment to the project site. 
Personnel have been chosen from the available pool of individuals on the basis of 
experience with projects of this type. Dedicated equipment for the project will be 
transported to the site. 

Demobilization of personnel and equipment will be executed only after all site 
activities are completed and all equipment having contact with contaminants has been 
thoroughly decontaminated. Once decontaminated, all personnel and equipment will be 
removed from the site in a timely and efficient manner. 

2.2 SITE SETUP 

2.2.1 Support Area 

An office trailer will be established for Contractor field office activities. The 
office will be equipped with utilities including electric heat and air-conditioning. 
Telephones will be provided as well as a facsimile machine. A decontamination 
area will be setup on the site and will provide ample storage space for protective 
clothing and gear. An on-site laboratory will be staged on-site and optimized for 
EPA methods and process control parameters. A secure storage trailer may also 
be provided for miscellaneous tools, spare parts and materials. All support trailers 
and facilities will be staged as depicted in the site layout map. 



Page 2 - 2 



2.2.2 Site Support Facilities 

Office Trailer 

Will provide office space, desk-type work stations (2), drawing table, phone 
lines, FAX machine, personal computer 

On-site Laboratory 

Self contained mobile laboratory. Contains lab counter tops, a fume control 
hood, electrical control panels, all required instruments and lab equipment, secure 
storage for flammable and corrosive reagents, an eye wash and a safety shower, 
cabinets for miscellaneous storage. The lab has all systems necessary to conduct 
EPA Method SW-846 (Total and TCLP Lead). The lab is used for optimization and 
control of the MAECTITE® process, and for confirmation of process performance (as 
outlined in the site specific Quality Assurance Project Plan). The laboratory will be 
operated by and is the responsibility of the designated Project Chemist. 

Equipment and Spare Part Storage 

A small trailer or van truck will be present to house miscellaneous materials, 
hand tools, and spare and service parts/materials for treatment and earthmoving 
equipment. 

2.3 EXCAVATION OF BERM SOILS 

The berm soils for each range will be excavated to limits determined from visual 
observations and metals analysis from the initial evaluation of the berms as outlined in the 
Pre-Excavation Sampling and Analysis Plan (Section 3.1). The soils will be excavated 
utilizing a track mounted backhoe (Komatsu PC200 or similar). The soils will be 

Page 2 - 3 



transported to the untreated soil stockpile area at the central processing plant via tandem 
dump trucks. 

2.4 SCREENING OF BERM SOILS 

Prior to chemical fixation of the berm soils the material will be screened to remove 
large lead fragments. This will be accomplished by processing the material through a 
shredder unit then screening the soil through a 2" screen and then a No.4 screen. Any 
material rejected by the 2" screen will be stockpiled and treated with the MAECTITE® liquid 
reagent applied manually to the oversize pile. This material will then be tested for TCLP 
compliance and relocated to the treated pile staging area. The lead fragments collected 
off the No.4 mesh screen will be handled as outlined in the Lead Processing and 
Disposition Plan (Section 7.0). Material passing the No.4 screen will be fed directly to the 
pugmill for ex-situ processing in a totally enclosed manner. 

2.5 EX- SITU MAECTITE® PROCESSING 

Berm soils which pass through the No.4 screen will be fed directly into the pugmill 
hopper. The soils will then cross a weigh belt for feed rate measurement and control. As 
the material enters the pugmill chamber the liquid MAECTITE® reagents and water will be 
added for blending. The material will be discharged and stockpiled in post treatment 
stockpile areas pending confirmation analytical. Range berm soils will be treated to meet 
project performance criteria within 90 days of having been excavated. Figure 2-1 provides 
a layout of the processing equipment area. 



Page 2 - 4 



2.6 IN- SITU MAECTITE® PROCESSING 

After the berm soils have been excavated to the limits determined by the Sampling 
and Analytical Plan (Section 3.1), the MAECTITE® reagents will be applied to the berm and 
to the flat area in front of the berm if leachable lead exceeds 5.0 mg/l. Confirmation 
samples will be collected and tested for project compliance. 

2.7 SITE LAYOUT AND TREATMENT SYSTEM CONFIGURATION 

Material in the untreated stockpile will be fed into a screening plant with a hydraulic 
excavator, pass through a 6" bar screen, 2" screen and then a No. 4 mesh screen to 
separate lead fragments from oversize materials. Material is then fed into the hopper of 
the pugmill. As the material passes over the weigh belt, a controller sends a signal to the 
liquid reagent pump for feed. The pugmill conveyor delivers the soil to an enclosed mixer 
where MAECTITE® liquid reagent is delivered and mixed. The liquid MAECTITE® solution 
is applied via a spray bar. Water flow is controlled by valve adjustment and monitored by 
treatment personnel. The quantity of water addition is determined on-site in the mobile 
laboratory during treatability studies conducted. 

The system will be configured at the central processing area across from the range 
control office. Overall width of the treatment area is approximately 100 feet. 

Chemically fixed material from the discharge end of the system will be relocated with 
a rubber-tired front end loader to the staging area for verification analytical. 



Page 2 - 6 



2.8 SITE ACTIVITY FLOW CHART 
Fixation System and Placement: 

1 . Excavate berm soils and transport to untreated soil stockpile area. 

2. Screen range soils to remove oversize material (>2") and recover metal (#4). 

3. Pugmill hopper receives material from the screen plant for feeding in a controlled 
manner to the conveyor belt. 

4. Conveyor Belt - moves material across load cells (weight belt to determine 
appropriate reagent addition) and into pugmill 

5. Pugmill - thoroughly mixes waste with water and MAECTITE® reagents and then 
discharges treated material 

6. Poly tanks - contain MAECTITE® solution pumped to the Portec pugmill 

7. Front-end Loader - picks up processed material and stages in curing area in 
separate 500 ton lots for confirmation sampling. 

8. Return processed soils back to range berms. 

2.9 PROJECT EQUIPMENT 

2.9.1 Equipment List and Functions 



Page 2 - 7 



Treatment/Material Handling (Ex-Situ) 



ITEM 



FUNCTION 



1 PC 200 Komatsu excavator 
(or similar) 

1 loader 



Powerscreen: 

1 screened conveyor/shredder 

1 Portec 52 pugmill 

2 3k gal tanks 

1 5k gal poly tank 

1 MAECTITE® feed system 

1 flow meter 

1 CAT 950 loader or similar 

1 feed system control panel 

2 tandem dump trucks 



Feeds treatment/excavate soil 



Feeds treatment system when excavator can no 
longer efficiently reach waste and tracking is 
required, (tail-end treatment) 



Receives soil from excavator, removes objects 
and lead fragments 

Weighs soil material fed to system and 
blends soil with treatment chemical 

Stores MAECTITE® reagents 

Stores water for MAECTITE® and decon- 
tamination activity, and dust control 

Applies MAECTITE®liquid in prescribed dosages 
to pugmill mixer 

Measures rate and total MAECTITE® solution 
applied to mixer 

Moves treated material to staging area, loads 
trucks, grades site 

Controls treatment system 

Haul range soils from berms to central process 
unit, haul processed soil back to range berms 



Page 2 - 8 



Treatment (In-Situ) 



ITEM 



FUNCTION 



1 PC 200 Komatsu excavator 
(or similar) 

1 3K gal portable tank 

1 5K gal water truck 

1 MAECTITE® feed system 



Material mixing 



Stores MAECTITE® concentrate 

Stores water for use in MAECTITE® application, 
decontamination, dust control 

Applies MAECTITE® concentrate in prescribed 
dosages 



Page 2 - 9 



Site Support 



ITEM 



1 office trailer 



1 decontamination area 
1 on-site laboratory 

1 AA/TCLP agitator, etc 

1 decontamination line 
1 sedan 

1 pickup truck 

2 safety shower/eyewash 



FUNCTION 

Base of site operations 

Personnel and equipment decontamination 

Analyze samples for lead and other operating 
parameters using various methods as per the 
QAPjP 

Instruments and equipment to comply with 
QAPjP and SW-846 methods 

Personnel and small item decon 

Personnel transport 

Personnel and misc. item trans. 

Emergency decontamination at the 
decontamination line and in the on-site lab. 



Page 2-10 



<» 







2.9.2 Preventative Maintenance 

1) Gross material to be removed from all equipment on a daily basis to prevent 
ceasing and damage to moving parts 

2) Lubricate and fill fluids on all equipment on a daily basis. Change as per 
manufacturers specifications 

3) Check and change all air filters as required 

4) Lubricate all bearings and grease fittings on a daily basis. 

2.10 EROSION AND DUST CONTROL 

During the excavation of the contaminated material, Sevenson shall control and 
minimize the generation of dust to the maximum extent practical, using water sprays. The 
water may be mixed with MAECTITE® reagent to aid in dust control. Processed material 
is moist and is not a dust source. 

Dust control in the treatment system will be addressed by utilizing a closed mixer. 
At the point of the MAECTITE® application, the mixer will be open but covered with a 
safety screen to prevent access. Sprays of MAECTITE® reagent and water will dampen 
the material and prevent fugitive dusts. 

Sevenson does not anticipate erosion problems during site activity. However, 
earthmoving equipment (to create swales) and straw bales will be used to control water 
run-on/run-off and erosion. Geotextile silt fencing will be installed for additional protection 
if deemed necessary by the site supervisor. Erosion control measures will be maintained 
until final placement of the berm material is completed. 



Page 2-11 



6 



2.1 1 PERSONNEL AND EQUIPMENT DECONTAMINATION AREAS 

A decontamination area will be placed on each discrete range site including 
equipment drop and contamination reduction areas as described in the site Health and 
Safety Plan. 

A 1 5' x 25' decontamination pad will be constructed on-site for heavy equipment and 
small equipment decontamination. Equipment will be "power washed" clean before 
transportation from the site. It will contain a sump for fluid collection. During MAECTITE® 
treatment processing operations all contaminated decontamination rinse liquids will be 
used as makeup water in the treatment system. Debris from the waste pile may be 
treated/decontaminated at this location. 

A dry decontamination utilizing shovels and other hand tools will be performed daily 
on heavy equipment and treatment equipment to reduce gross contamination and other 
debris which builds up as a result of routine equipment service procedures. 

2.12 WINTER OPERATION MEASURES 

The following preventative measures will be help insure continued operations during 
the winter months: 

► At the end of each work shift any residual soils will be removed from the working 
components of the equipment. 

► For process equipment, all belts and rollers are to be checked for damp soils or 
other materials which could freeze. 

► All internal water lines will be drained. 

► Block heaters will be supplied and installed at the end of each shift. 

Page 2-12 



► 



► 



Prior to the beginning of any shift the equipment will be inspected to insure that no 
ice build up or other health and safety concerns are present. 

The reagent storage tank will be insulated to protect the material from the climate 
extremes. 

Water storage tanks will have a circulating pump to maintain water movement and 
prevent freezing. 



2.13 SITE SECURITY AND ACCESS 

Anyone entering the range area is required sign in with the range control officer. 
Access to the individual range sites will be controlled by Sevenson. Prior to entrance to 
any site, individuals will be required to read, understand, and sign the site Health and 
Safety Plan. All employees and site visitors will be required to sign in and out on the Site 
Access Log located in the office trailer. Persons entering the work exclusion zone must 
comply with the site Health and Safety Plan. No unauthorized individuals will be allowed 
access. The exclusion area for each range will be surrounded with 4' orange plastic 
fencing and appropriate signage. 



Page 2-13 



% 



3.0 SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS PROJECT PLAN (SAPP) 

I 

3.1 PRE EXCAVATION FIELD SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS PLAN 

3.1.1 Introduction 

Soils in target range backstops (berms) at the Massachusetts Military Reservation 
(MMR), on Cape Cod, MA, are known to contain varying amounts of metallic lead, copper, 
antimony, and other metals after many years of training in weapons handling for our 
country's armed forces and some local law enforcement agencies. At this time, the full 
extent and quantities of metals in MMR target range soils is not known. 

It has been determined that much of the metal will be removed and recycled and 
that residual unrecoverable lead will be processed by Sevenson to insure against release 
of contaminants to surface or groundwater. "Recoverable" refers to lead that is captured 
by the No. 4 screen and managed for recycling. "Unrecoverable" refers to lead fragments 

that pass through the No. 4 screen that will be processed by the MAECTITE® technology 
to prevent leaching (when the TCLP lead concentration exceeds 5.0mg/l). 

The objectives of this plan are to establish frameworks for (1) identifying the extent 
of metals present in MMR berm soils which are recoverable or which have the potential for 
leaching and (2) insuring that the objectives of the soils processing activity have been met. 

3.1.2 Background 

What is known about the metals in berm and near berm soils at the MMR is the 
following: 



Page 3 - 1 



1) Metals Present. The highest concentration metal is lead, from slugs, followed by 
copper, from jacketing. Antimony is used in the manufacturing of some projectiles 
used in military weaponry, but its concentration is far below that of lead and copper. 

2) Potential Health Issue - Lead. Metallic lead is known to be a toxin if ingested or 
inhaled in sufficient quantities. 

3) Size Range. Metal is present in a wide range of sizes, from whole bullets (50 mm 
and smaller) to microscopic fragments produced as bullets impact the berm. 

4) Berm Types. Two types of berms are found in MMR target ranges; (1) primary 
berms, which are located immediately behind the target stands, and (2) secondary 
berms, which are higher structures located immediately behind the primary berm in 
certain ranges (generally the longer distance ranges, where extra containment is 
thought to be required). 

5) Variable Concentrations. Metal concentrations in the berm and near berm soils 
are widely varied, as expected. However, certain generalizations apply, as follows: 

A) In each of the MMR target ranges the entire face of the berm is believed 
to contain recoverable metals (fragments). These fragments are believed to 
be located within 2'-3' of the surface of each berm, but this is not known with 
certainty. 

B) Some berms may have been "resurfaced" with 2' to 3' fresh soil at one or 
more times during their operational lifetime. In these cases, metal fragments 
may be found at distances well beyond the surface of the berm face. 

C) The primary berms in the shorter distance ranges (25 meters) are 
characterized by depressions or "pockets" located immediately behind the 

Page 3 - 2 



target positions. These pockets contain the highest observed concentrations 
of metal recoverable fragments. 

D) Metal fines which embody the potential for leaching may be found at 
distances of 4'-5' beyond the face of a primary berm. Again, this distance 
may be greater if the berm has been resurfaced. 

E) Little is presently known about metal distributions in secondary berms. 
Logic might suggest that (1) concentrations will be generally lower than 
primary berms, (2) there will be no impact "pockets", and (3) recoverable or 
leachable metals will be found at shallower depths than in primary berms. 
But this is not known with certainty. 

F) Range surface soils within 10' of the "toe" of a berm may contain metals. 
The source of this is most likely: ricochets, rounds fired into the ground, 
materials which rolled down the sloping face of the berm, or, were washed 
down during rain episodes. Fragments may be found on or within 1' of the 
surface. Fines which embody the potential for leaching may be found at 
depths of up to 6' for primary berms and shallower depths for secondary 
berms. 

6) Under the proposed plan the berm and near berm soils containing "recoverable" 
metal fragments will be excavated and screened twice; first to remove rocks and 
debris, (>2"), and second to recover metal fragments (#4 screen, approx. 3/16") 
Screened soils will be processed ex-situ by the MAECTITE® process to achieve the 
RCRA targets described in paragraph 2, above. 

7) Under the proposed plan soils which do not contain recoverable metal, but which 
do contain "leachable" metal concentrations above the RCRA standards mentioned 
above, will be processed in-situ by the MAECTITE® process. 

Page 3 - 3 



I 






3.1.3 Performance Specifications 

Reference analytical methods for this program will be the following: 

1) Total Lead. USEPA Method 7420 (Total Metals) 

2) TCLP Lead. 40 CFR, Part 268, Appendices 1 (Toxicity Characteristic Leaching 
Procedure) SW-846, Method 1311 followed by USEPA Method 7420. 

3.1 .4 General Range Assessment Plan for the Evaluation of the Extent of Recoverable 
and Potentially Leachable Lead. 

Each of the target ranges at the MMR serves a different purpose. Consequently, 
no two ranges are exactly alike. This means that separate and specific assessment and 
processing plans will be required for each range. However, the similarities between the 
ranges provide the basis for a generalized assessment and processing approach. The 
General Assessment Plan will be used as the basis for individual Range Assessment Plans 
early in the program, following the Preliminary Site Visit and Survey. 

3.1.4.1 General Range Assessment Plan 

Figure 3-1 outlines the decision flow which will be employed for the preprocessing 
evaluation of each of the ranges slated for work in this program. The following discussion 
follows this flow. 

3.1.4.1.1 Determination of the Lateral Extent and Depth of Recoverable Lead. 

A) Visual Survey for Bullet "Pockets". Berm face depressions immediately behind 
each target stand, created by repeated projectile impacts, are believed to contain 
the highest concentrations of both recoverable and potentially leachable lead. 

Page 3 - 4 



} ! 



Therefore, these locations should represent a "worst case scenario" and where they 
are present the assessment will center on them. This approach is expected to 
generate 1,324 samples (more or less) from all the ranges combined. The actual 
number of samples per range will be determined by EPA and NGB contractor on the 
site. 

A-1) Sample Point Specification - Pockets Present. The central pocket in the 
primary berm will be identified. The approximate center of this pocket will be 
the initial evaluation point for this berm. Additional sample points will be 
identified in both directions along the berm face at lateral intervals of 
approximately 25' until the ends of the berm are reached. Pockets closest 
to the 25' interval points will be selected for sampling. A berm toe sample 
point will be aligned with each berm face sample point. It will be located on 
the range surface, within 1' of the berm toe. 

A-2) Point Specification - No Identifiable Pocket. Where no identifiable 
pockets or similar concentrations of lead fragments are observed, the initial 
sampling point will be halfway up the berm face in the approximate lateral 
center of the berm. Additional sample points will be set at 25' intervals 
laterally along the berm face. 

B) Sample Collection. A hand held, manually driven split spoon sampler will be 
driven roughly horizontally into the face of the berm at each sample point, in 2' 
intervals, to a depth of at least 6'. Samples will be collected at the surface and at 
each 2' interval. The sampling hole will be lined with a plastic tube following each 
interval drive, in order to insure against collapse. If subsequent analyses reveal that 
a 6' sample contains recoverable or potentially leachable lead, sampling will 
continue to the depth at which neither condition applies. 



Page 3 - 5 



Similar samples will be taken at the berm toe sample points, with the exception that 
the split spoon sampler will be driven roughly vertically. While no difficulty is 
anticipated in driving the sample in the berm face, we may encounter rejection in 
some berm toe locations. In this event, sampling attempts will be made in the 
general vicinity (within 2'-3') until success is achieved. 

In the event that it proves impossible to hand drive the split spoon sampler to a 
depth of 6', Sevenson will implement a mechanical alternative; i.e. a trailer or truck 
mounted hydraulic ram probe. 

C) Visual Screening of Samples for Recoverable Metal. Recoverable metal 
fragments in berm soils are readily identifiable to the naked eye. The coloring, 
luster, and texture of lead and copper make them stand out. A single piece of 
recoverable metal in a 2' interval sample will designate that soil for excavation and 
ex-situ processing. 

Ex-Situ Processing Path . Paragraphs D through G, below apply to the Ex Situ Path on 
Figure 3-1 . 

D) Excavation for Screening and Ex-Situ Processing. Once sample evaluation has 
determined the depth of berm face and berm toe soils which contain recoverable 
metals, those soils will be mechanically excavated and transported to the Screening 
and Ex Situ Processing Area. At each lateral point, the entire face of the berm, from 
top to bottom and 50' wide, will be removed. It is likely that the depth of soil 
removed will vary at lateral points along a berm. We expect to identify recoverable 
metal at greater depths in the central, more heavily used areas of a berm, than in 
those areas nearer the ends. However, this is not known to be the case, and 
decisions will be based upon data, not speculation. 



Page 3 - 6 



% 



At toe sample points, soils containing recoverable metals will be removed to the 
required depth from a 5'-10' wide band of the range surface (measured perpendicularly 
from the berm toe). 

E) Analysis of Excavated Soils. Excavated soils will be moved to the Screening and 
Ex Situ Processing Area and staged in approximate 500 ton lots. Samples will be 
randomly taken from each lot and subjected to analysis for Total Lead and TCLP 
Leachable Lead. In those instances where a lot is found to have TCLP Leachable 
Lead less than the RCRA standard of 5.0 mg/L, that soil will be screened for 
recoverable lead and then run through the pugmill but will not require the application 
of the MAECTITE reagents as the material already meets the project performance 
criteria. 

R Ratio between Total Lead and TCLP Leachable Lead. 

As sampling results come in, we will evaluate whether a ratio between Total Lead 
and TCLP Leachable Lead does indeed exist for the berm soils and berm toe soils 
at this site. Working in cooperation with NGB and USEPA Sevenson will seek to set 
a specific Total Lead figure to use as an analog indicator that TCLP Leachable Lead 
is safely less than 5.0 mg/L. This figure may be employed for soils which are being 
evaluated for the "In-Situ Path" on Figure 3-1. 

G) No Further Analysis for Screened Soils Prior to Processing. It is not consider 
likely that the process of mechanically screening lead from berm soils will have the 
effect of reducing the TCLP Leachable Lead concentration. Further, since the 
pugmill will be directly feed from the screening plant, no intermediate sample 
collection is necessary. Therefore, screened soils will be processed immediately 
through the pugmill without additional sampling. 



Page 3 - 7 



In-Situ Processing Path . Paragraphs H through K, below apply to the In- Situ Path on 
Figure 3-1. 

H) Analysis of Soil for In Situ Processing. Samples collected which do not contain 
recoverable metal will be subjected to Total Lead analysis. If, as we expect, 
analytical efforts during the assessment of soils slated for metal recovery have been 
successful, expensive, time consuming analysis for TCLP Leachable Lead will not 
be necessary. A Total Lead standard will be used as an analog measure of TCLP 
Leachable Lead less than 5.0 mg/L. If not, we will, of course, fall back on the 
standard TCLP analysis for each sample. 

I) Samples With TCLP Leachable Lead Less Than 5.0 mg/L. Those soils found to 
have TCLP Leachable Lead less than 5.0 mg/L will not be considered for in-situ 
processing. 

J) Samples With TCLP Leachable Lead Greater Than 5.0 mg/L. Those soils found 
to have TCLP Leachable Lead greater than 5.0 mg/L will be processed in-situ by the 
MAECTITE® process. 

K) In-Situ Processing Depth. Prior experience shows that the depth to which soils 
may be processed in-situ varies somewhat from one site to another, depending 
upon soil permeability, degree of slope and other factors. We won't know for 
certain what depths will be possible at the MMR ranges until we begin working. 
However, in-situ processing soils in level areas to depths of 1 8" to 24" have been 
achievable at most of our in-situ project sites so far, and the sandy, permeable 
character nature of soils at the MMR seems to bode well for 18"-24" in-situ 
processing depths during this project. For sloped surfaces the effective processing 
depth is limited to approximately 9". 



Page 3 - 8 



' 



In the event the depth of soils which do not contain recoverable lead, but which do 
contain TCLP Leachable Lead greater than 5.0 mg/L is greater than 18"-24" (flat) 
or 9" (sloped), then the work will be done in "lifts". After a layer has been 
processed, it will be removed and staged nearby so that the next layer can be 
accessed. This procedure will be repeated to whatever depth if necessary. 



Page 3 - 9 



,. 



( 



• 



FIGURE 3-1 


Evaluation and Processing of Berm & Near Berm Soils at Range "X" 




Survey of Berm Face for Visual 
Evidence of "Bullet Pockets" 

Points of concentrated fire are marked by a 
noticeable depression in the berm face and/or 
the absence of vegetation. 








No 


Yes 










4 




J 


I 






Random Sample Points 

1 st core @ vert & horiz. center of berm 
face, others at 25' lateral spacing. Berm 
toe samples at same internals. 


Samples collected at 2' depth 
intervals to a depth of at least 
6' with a hand-driven split- 
spoon sampler. 


Bullet Pocket Centers 

1st core @ center of cerrtermost bullet 
pocket others in bullet pockets at -25' 
lateral spacing. Berm toe samples at 
same lateral spacings. 




Ex 
Situ 

Path 

i 


l 

Visual Screen of Individual Samples for 
Recoverable Fragments of Metallic Lead 

"Recoverable" lead fragments will be removed during processing 
by a #4 screen (-3/16"). The color, texture, and density of such 
fragments will make them stand out from other soil constituents. 


ll 

Si 
Ps 


1 

tu 
th 


Yes No 








Jl 


i 


I 


Excavatio 
Proci 

Soils containing rec 
excavated and tra 
Screening and Prco 


n & Ex Situ 
wmlng 

overable lead will be 
nsported to the Soi 
essing Area. 




Ex-Situ Soil 

Processing 

System 

\ 
\ 
\ 
\ 


Analytica 

1 (Total Lead- pp 
2) TCLP "leachab 


Assesment 

m. 

le" lead - mg/l 




Analytical Assessment 

1) Total lead -ppm 

2) TCLP -teachable" lead -mg/L 






TCLPLead 
<5mg/L 


TC 

> 


LP Lead 
5 me/L 






TCLP Lead < 5 mg/L 




r 




' 


TCLPLead 




No Processing 

Soils with TCLP lead <5.0 
mg/L will not require 
processing). 






Screening - 
Debris Removal 

>2* - remove rocks & debris. 


Screening - 

Debris Removal 

>2" - remove rocks 4 debris. 


> 5 mg/L 














<2" 
V 




>2" 


s. \ 


r >2" 






I' 






<T\ 


1 




In-Situ Soil Processing 

Soils containing TCLP lead >5.0 mg/L 
but not containing recoverable lead will 
be processed irvsitu by direct application 
of the MAECTITE* Process. 






Screening - 
Lead Recovery 

>#4 - recover lead fragments. 


Screening - 
Lead Recovery 

>#4 - recover lead fragments. 










TCLP lead 
> 5.0 mg/L 














,*- ' 


^ 


\>m 

V 


<#4 










>#4 <#4 










\ 


f 








* 


' 






Post-Processing Analysis 

Processed soils will be analyzed for 
teachable lead (TCLP -mg/l). The target 
is < 5.0 mg/l. In the event of failure, 
materials will be reprocessed. 






MAECTITE" Processing 

Screened soil will be processed 
■ex-situ" by the MAECTITE # 
Chemical Treatment Process. 








v 




-i 




I 






\ 


/ 






Post-Process Analysis 

Processed soils are analyzed for 
teachable lead (TCLP - mg/l). If 
TCLP>5.0 mg/1, materials are 
reprocessed. 








Lead Recycling 

Recovered metals will 
be stored In bins and 
staged for disposition 
by the Massachusetts 
National Guard. 




TCLP lead 




TCLP leaf. 


1 










> 5.0 mg/L 


\ 


< 5.0 mg/L 

' 1 


f 


Processed Soil Disposition 

Soils successfully processed ex situ will 
be returned to the ranges. 










. ^ 













































1 



' 



A 3.2 TREATED MATERIAL SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS PLAN 

3.2.1 Sampling Objective(s): Sampling Frequency Requirements 



Sampling objectives to meet the analytical performance specifications of the 
Massachusetts Military Reservation Site (presented in Table 3-1) are to obtain a 
representative sample of the treated material in order to test for TCLP lead. 

TABLE 3-1 
PERFORMANCE SPECIFICATIONS 



# 



• 



Required Test Acceptable Results 

TCLP lead = < 5 mg/l 



Reference Methods for the above test are as follows: 

TCLP lead: 40 CFR, Part 268, Appendices I (Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure) 
Method 1311, SW-846. Total lead in extract Method 7420, SW846. 

All analytical data shall be of known quality and formally reported after compliance 
with the QAPjP is confirmed by the QA/QC Coordinator, or Director of Treatment Services. 

Sampling frequency, sample matrices and analytical parameters are presented in 
Table 3-2. During the course of the remedial work plan implementation, soil sampling and 
testing will be a routine task to support the decision making as follows: 



Page 3-11 



I 



TABLE 3-2 
SAMPLING FREQUENCY 



Sample Matrix Parameters Frequency 

Soil Total and Every 500 tons processed output 

TCLP Lead * See Note 



*Note: The proposed technical approach suggests managing the materials in 
approximately 500 ton lots. This quantity is less than the anticipated daily production rate 
therefore at least one representative sample will be collected each day. Additional 
samples may be collected after major changes in operating conditions to confirm 
performance before running a large volume of material through the process if it did not 
meet the performance criteria. 

Sevenson shall submit two (2) duplicate samples for TCLP lead analyses to the 
NGB. The sample locations shall be approved by the NGB. 

3.2.2 Data Quality Objectives 

The development of Data Quality Objectives (DQO) is based on USEPA documents 
using a 3-stage process: Identify decision types, identify data needs and uses, and design 
a data collection/documentation program. The SOW highlights the Quality 
Assurance/Quality Control Guidance for Removal Activities (EPA 540G-90/004) April 1 990. 
Sevenson intends to operate a laboratory on site at QA2 level of objectives, and to insure 
compliance the same level of QA objectives with the independent subcontract 
laboratory(ies). As allowed in EPA's QA/QC guidance document (April 1990), use of an 
on site laboratory is allowed for confirmatory analysis provided that: 1) QA Level II 
objectives are followed; 2) 10% of all samples are analyzed by an independent laboratory; 

Page 3-12 



p 



and 3) the NGB and or EPA has confidence in the data generated on-site. This can be 
accomplished by on-site analysis of NGB provided blind performance samples, if required 
by the NGB and or EPA. 

The DQO are qualitative and quantitative statements which specify the quality of the 
data required to support decisions made during remedial activities and are based on the 
end uses of the data to be collected. As such, different data uses may require different 
levels of data quality. There are five analytical levels which address various data uses and 
the QA/QC effort. Sevenson shall utilize DQO level 2 for field and laboratory analysis of 
TCLP lead and total lead in the mobile laboratory on-site. 

The rationale for QA2 objectives are to verify analytical results. A minimum of 10% 
verification of results by an independent laboratory is required. That is, for every 10 
samples collected for on-site laboratory analysis for a given parameter, at least 1 sample 
will be sent out following appropriate chain of custody procedures to an independent 
laboratory for verification. This objective will allow the NGB to focus on performance 
results using Sevenson's on-site lab and verifying at least 10% of the sample load by 
vigorous analytical methods and quality assurance. The results of the 10% of 
substantiated data gives an associated statistical significance for the remaining 90%. 

The requirements for QA2 objectives are as follows: 

A. Sample documentation 

B. Chain of custody 

C. Sample holding times 

D. Initial and continuing instrument calibration data 

E. Method blank, rinsate blank, trip blank data 

F. The detection limit of 0.5 mg/l will be required for lead analyzed by direct flame 
aspiration technique using an AA 

Page 3-13 



Details on these requirements of the QA2 objective are given in the QAPjP. 

The results of 10% of the samples in the analytical data packages will be evaluated 
for all of the elements, A through F, listed above. The holding times, blank contamination 
and detection capability will be reviewed for all samples. 

Objectives of the QAPjP is to outline and implement the quality control and chain-of- 
custody procedures in accordance with the QA 2 objective as described in QA/QC 
Guidance for Removal Activities, April 1990, EPA/540/G-90/004. 

The DQO Level 2 provides adequate data quality for this project and is sufficient for 
confirmational testing purposes. 

3.2.3 Analytical Sources (off-site laboratory) 

4fe Sevenson shall make sure that the off-site subcontracted laboratory as well as the 

on-site laboratory maintain a documented Quality Assurance Program that complies with 
QA 2 objective. All sampling and testing procedures shall follow the documented Quality 
Assurance Program plan and the QAPjP. 

The subcontract laboratory will be required to operate at DQO Level 2 for 
confirmational testing of (I) clean-up during removal activities, and (ii) verification of SOW 
specified treatment standards. 

Sevenson has chosen Waste Stream Technology, Inc. (WST), 302 Grote Street, 
Buffalo, New York for subcontract work to fulfill the requirements of USEPA for QA2 
objectives QA/QC data evaluation. A copy of the WST Quality Assurance Plan, and 
Statement of Qualifications for Sampling and Analytical Services is included in this Work 
Plan. 



Page 3-14 



3.2.4 Sampling Procedures 

The field sampling procedures plan consists of the following activities: 

Sampling plan and selection of sampling locations 
Sampling equipment and techniques 
Sample containers, preservatives and holding times 
Paperwork and notes on sampling conditions 
Sample shipping and transportation 

In order to obtain a representative sample of the final product (treated berm soils), 
10 random grab samples will be composited from a 500 ton lot of treated material. 
Random samples will be generated by dividing the population by an imaginary grid, 
assigning a series of consecutive numbers (1-10) to the units of the grid, and selecting the 
numbers to be sampled through the use of a random-numbers table. This procedure for 
random sampling will produce "true random" samples as specified in the SW-846 Volume 
II, Chapter 9.1.1.2. Alternatively , a grab sample of each 50 tons of treated and cured 
material will be sampled every half hour during the course of treatment. Thus for every 500 
ton treated lot, there will be 10 grab random samples generated within 2 hours of 
treatment. The 10 random samples will be composited and thoroughly homogenized. The 
homogeneous sample will be split into three equal duplicate samples. One split sample 
will be sent to an outside laboratory chosen by the NGB under chain of custody for 
confirmatory testing. The second split of the treated sample will be tested by the Sevenson 
on-site laboratory. The third split will be retained on-site. The treated samples will be 
dated and labeled with numeric designations as T001, T002, T003, etc. with project 
number and the date of sampling. At least 1 0% of the samples will be sent for confirmatory 
testing to an off-site laboratory. The off-site laboratory chosen for data validation and 
confirmatory testing program will be checked for QA/QC programs in place initially and for 
capability to operate and meet the project needs in terms of schedule such as turn around 
times, cost-effectiveness, and DQO (QA2 level). 

Page 3-15 



3.2.5 Sampling Equipment and Containers 

A list of sampling devices is given in Section 4 of the QAPjP. Samples will be 
collected with a clean steel hand spatula. Samples will be removed from the hand augers 
using soil spatulas, placed in sealed glass jars equipped with Teflon-lined lids. 
Decontamination procedures for the MMR require washing with a scrub brush and finally 
rinsing with deionized water. The wash solution and rinsate are collected in buckets. All 
rinse waters will be used as make-up water for the treatment system. 

Field duplicates and split samples are generated from a single collection utilizing all 
the material obtained and representatively distributed between various sampling jars. 
Replicates are collected from the same matrix at the same time utilizing the same 
procedures and equipment, however, the point of collection is adjacent to each other. 
Field QA/QC samples are documented in the sample log. Samples are spiked by the 
subcontract laboratory or Sevenson's mobile laboratory. Blank samples are sent to the 
laboratory to find any sample contamination during the entire process. 

Samples are collected in sealed glass jars equipped with Teflon-lined lids and 
cooled to 4° C in a cooler. For samples to be analyzed for TCLP lead, maximum holding 
time for samples from field collection to TCLP extraction is 180 days in a refrigerator at 4 
degrees Celsius. Maximum holding time for the TCLP extract at 4°C is 180 days. For 
samples to be analyzed for total metals, the maximum holding time is six months. 



Page 3-16 



3.2.6 Analytical Data Turn Around Time 

Sevenson's laboratories on site and/or off site will provide the following turn around 
times for the listed parameters: 

PARAMETER TURN AROUND TIME* 

TCLP METALS 20 TO 36 HOURS 

TOTAL METALS 20 TO 36 HOURS 

* From the time sample is received by the laboratory 

3.2.7 Record Keeping and Reporting Procedures 

After proper labeling, numbering and identification of each sample, appropriate 
chain-of-custody forms are completed as described in Section 5 of the QAPjP. Sampling 
conditions and major visible or self-evident characteristics are noted, such as color, 
physical state, odor, specific appearance, etc. Paperwork may include preparation of 
sample logs, shipping papers and special instructions, if any, to the sample receiving entity. 
A sample of the field sample tracking report form is attached in the QAPjP for use by the 
field crew. 

Field personnel will be responsible for entering all daily field activities, 
measurements and observations in a bound field log book. All data will be recorded legibly 
in the log book with each day's entries signed and dated. The field log book will be 
assigned to each individual with all pages numbered. The personnel responsible for the 
changes will initial and date all modifications to the log. Upon completion of all field work, 
the field log book will be placed in the project file. The project chemist shall fax all 
analytical data to the QA/QC Coordinator routinely for his review. 

Page 3-17 



The project chemist will report to the site supervisor on a daily basis and provide 
written analytical data in tabular format with adequate QA/QC information to document the 
data quality, any problems with corrective action in place or taken and recommendations. 
The site supervisor shall review the analytical reports and stamp it "Preliminary Data" 
subject to QA/QC review. The QA/QC Coordinator shall review all analytical reports and 
validate data with appropriate flags. The subcontract laboratory shall communicate 
analytical data along with QA/QC reports to the site as well as to the QA/QC Coordinator 
in the Midwest Division office on a daily basis. The analytical data will be checked for 
accuracy, precision, comparability and completeness every day as it is received. Any 
QA/QC problems identified by the site project chemist and/or by the QA/QC Coordinator 
will be subject to corrective action. The implementation of corrective action and its impact 
will be documented in the report. All analytical data will be stamped "Preliminary Data" 
until formal QA/QC review by Sevenson is completed. Approved data will be stamped 
accordingly and sent to the site in an expeditious manner. 

The reports will be made available to the NGB as stated in the Site Work Plan. 

3.2.8 Sample Handling, Storage and Shipment 

All samples will be handled separately to prevent any cross contamination, labeled 
appropriately and logged to identify sampling point, objective and specific parameter of 
interest. The soil samples are stored at 4°C and packed appropriately to prevent any 
accidents or breakage of glass jars. Sections 4.0 and 5.0 of the attached Quality 
Assurance Project Plan highlight the details on sample handling, storage and shipping 
guidelines under strict chain of custody protocols as required in SW-846 methodology. 

All samples are shipped on time, and usually on the same day as sampled, to the 
receiving entity such as the subcontract laboratory. Shipments follow guideline of the 
carrier(s) and the Department of Transportation (DOT). For chain-of-custody procedures 
see Section 5 of the QAPjP and Section 120.06 of Sevenson's Technical Services Field 

Page 3-18 



• 



Guidance Manual maintained in the mobile lab. 

3.2.9 Subcontract Laboratories 

QA2 samples collected during field operations for the site will be analyzed by the 
following labs for both Total and TCLP lead, as well as copper, iron, nickel and antimony 
as requested by the EPA for data purposes only. 

I. Waste Stream Technology, Inc. 
302 Grote Street 
Buffalo, New York 14207 
(716) 876-5290 
Attn: Dr. James Hyzy 

Based on quality of services, cost-effectiveness and ability to meet the specified turn 
around time, Waste Stream Technology, Inc. is recommended for subcontract laboratory 
services. 

The subcontract laboratory is required to comply with QA 2 objectives for the 
parameters of interest and provide the data along with appropriate QA/QC documentation 
within specified turn around times for each parameter. Sevenson shall conduct an audit 
of the laboratory prior to shipment of sample for analyses. The laboratory will be required 
to sign off on copies of the QAPjP when approved by the NGB. 

3.2.10 Reprocess, Resample and Reanalyze 

Sevenson acknowledges the responsibility to reprocess, resample and reanalyze 
all treated material that fails to meet NGB's performance specifications for TCLP leachable 
lead. 

Page 3-19 



!> 



> 



V 



OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE PLAN 



- 






•a* 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



1.0 Introduction 

2.0 Sevenson Equipment Maintenance Operations Manual 

2.1 Automated Repair Order and Equipment Inspection Report - Sample 

2.2 Monthly Preventative Maintenance Service Schedule - Sample 

2.3 Monthly Equipment Hour Log Report - Sample 

2.4 Computer Screen Format for Preventative Maintenance Service Schedule 
3.0 Identification of Equipment 

3.1 Designated Equipment Performance Specifications with Standard Operating 
Procedures 
4.0 Miscellaneous 

4.1 Crew Requirements 

4.2 Equipment Storage 

4.3 Equipment Permitting Requirements 

4.4 Equipment Safety 



I 



<? 



1.0 Introduction 

The purpose of this Equipment Operations and Maintenance Plan is to establish the 
controls for the operation and maintenance of the mechanical equipment to be used for the 
removal of lead and soil fixation at MMR. The present controls followed by Sevenson 
Environmental Services, Inc. as well as the controls established for this project will help 
insure that all equipment utilized, will be maintained and operated in a manner so that it's 
operation on this project will not hinder the day to day operations of Sevenson 's effort. 

This plan also serves as a reference manual to help in training, developing and to 
familiarize onsite personnel with the specific equipment to be used on this project. All 
equipment maintenance is coordinated by the onsite Sevenson superintendent and is under the 
direction of the Sevenson equipment manager Mr. Jim Augustynek based in Niagara Falls, 
N.Y. 

The large majority of equipment to be used on this site consists of similar and 
standard pieces of industrial construction equipment which are used for routine construction 
type activities. This equipment in large has very much the same maintenance and operating 
characteristics and procedures. 

This Equipment Operations and Maintenance Plan will be updated as required on this 
jobsite in order to accommodate any different pieces of equipment which may be utilized in 
order to improve production and performance for this effort. 



Je 



>i.- 



Sevenson Equipment Maintenance Operations Manual 
Equipment Types - MMR Project 

Excavators 
Dozers 
Compaction 
Loaders (rubber tire) 
Backhoe (rubber tire) 
Compressor 
Dump trucks 
Generators 
Screening Plant 
Conveyors 



Pugmill 



PM MANUAL 
"GENERAL REQUIRED MAINTENANCE' 






V. ; 



PM SERVICE and INSPECTION "TYPE A" 
EVERY 250 HOURS 

1) ENGINE OIL CHANGE AND FILTERS. 

2) CHANGE STEERING FILTERS IF EQUIPPED. 

3) CHANGE FUEL FILTERS. 

4) CHECK AIR FILTERS, CLEAN OR CHANGE IF NECESSARY. 

5) EQUIPMENT INSPECTION REPORT/CHECK LIST ON REPAIR ORDER 

6) COMPLETE GREASE JOB AND ENGINE OIL SAMPLE. 

7) VISUAL INSPECTION OF EQUIPMENT. 



PM SERVICE "TYPE B" 
EVERY 1000 HOURS 

1) CHANGE HYDRAULIC OIL AND FILTER. 

2) CHANGE TRANSMISSION OIL. 

3) CHANGE FINAL DRIVE OR DIFFERENTIAL OIL 

4) TAKE SAMPLES ON ALL CHANGED OILS. 



PROCEDURE ON ANY MAJOR BREAKDOWNS OR REPAIRS 



1) OBTAIN AN ACCURATE EVALUATION AND ESTIMATE OF REPAIRS 
NECESSARY, AND TAKE INTO CONSIDERATION THE IMPACT ON YOUR 
JOB PROGRESS. 

2) NOTIFY THE MAIN GARAGE OFFICE IN NIAGARA FALLS, N.Y. 

3) REVIEW AND DETERMINE WITH THE GARAGE OFFICE FURTHER STEPS 
TO TAKE TO SOLVE YOUR PRESENT PROBLEM. 

4) IF THE MAJOR REPAIR IS COMPLETED BY AN OUTSIDE VENDOR, 
COMPLETE A SEVENSON REPAIR ORDER AND ATTACH A COPY OF THEIR 
WORK ORDER SHOWING PARTS AND LABOR DETAILS. 

5) REMEMBER, PEOPLE ARE THE MOST IMPORTANT ELEMENT OF A 
COMPLETE PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE PROGRAM. 



JANUARY 1, 199 5 



SEVENSON ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES 
PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE MANUAL 



PG. 1 



utf type of 

COOE EQUIPMENT 



MAINTENANCE OPERATION 



COOE 



« MAINTENANCE INTERVALS • 

Miles Hrs. Months 



01 EXCAVATOR 



1 — CHANGE ENGINE OIL and FILTER 



250 3 



2 — GREASE SWING CIRCLE and CHECK BACK UP ALARM 



250 3 



3 — REPLACE COOLANT FILTER 



500 4 



4 — CHANGE FINAL DRIVE & HYDRAULIC OIL 



1 800 18 



5 — FUEL TANK - DRAIN WATER & SEDIMENT 



100 1 



6 — TEST & CLEAN or REPLACE BATTERY(s) 



1 000 18 



7 — TAKE ENGINE OIL SAMPLE 



350 3 



% 



8 — TAKE FINAL DRIVES & HYRAULIC OIL SAMPLES 



900 12 



9 — COMPLETE GREASE JC6 and CHECK HOSE CONDITION 



250 2 



10 — CLEAN [], or REPLACE [], AIR FILTERS 



5C0 4 



11 — REPLACE [] or CHECK ALTERNATOR OPERATION [] 



1000 12 



12 — REPLACE HYDRAULIC FILTER(s) 



500 ' 5 



13 — CLEAN RADIATOR FINS or FLUSH SYSTEM 



750 9 



14 — REPLACE STARTER or CHECK FOR FAULTY WIRING 



150O 18 



15 — CHANGE FUEL FILTER(s) 



500 6 



03/10/93 MAINTENANCE REFERENCE COOES 



COOE 01 

EXCAVATOR 



' 



. 



SEVENSON ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES 
PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE MANUAL 



PG. 2 



TYPE Of 

h g@E EQUIPMENT 



MAINTENANCE OPERATION 



COPE 



• MAINTENANCE INTERVALS • 

MiTes Hrs. Months 



02 DOZER 



1 — ENGINE OIL CHANGE and FILTER 



250 3 



2 — CHECK STEERING CLUTCH OPERATION & OIL LEVEL 



3 — REPLACE BELTS [] CHECK HERE IF "OK" [] 



250 6 
750 12 



4 — TAKE FINAL DRIVE OIL SAMPLES 



750 9 



5 — CHECK STARTER & ALTERNATOR FOR REPLACEMENT 



1 8C0 12 



6 — REPLACE UNDERCARRAGE 



33C0 30 



7 — TEST & CLEAN or REPLACE BATTERY(s) 



1000 18 



8 — HYDRAULIC TANK - CHANGE OIL & FILTER 



1 000 12 



9 — COMPLETE GREASE JOB and CHECK HOSE CONDITION 



250 2 



10 — REPLACE AIR FILTERS 



400 4 



11 — TURN PINS AND BUSHINGS OR MEASURE WEAR 



1 500 12 



12 — CHANGE TRANSMISSION OIL and FILTER 



900 12 



13 — BACK UP ALARM - REPLACE [] or "OK" [] 



400 3 



14 — TAKE ENGINE OIL SAMPLE 



500 4 



15 — REPLACE or FLIP DOZER BLADE CUTTING EDGE 



900 9 



03/10/33 MAINTENANCE REFERENCE COOES 



CODE 02 

DOZER 



SEVENSON ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES 
PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE MANUAL 



PG. 4 



TYPE OF 
^21 EQUIPMENT 



MAINTENANCE OPERATION 



COPE 



« MAINTENANCE INTERVALS « 

Miles Hrs. Months 



04 COMPACTION 1 — - OIL CHANGE LUBE & FILTER 



100 2 



2 — TEST & CLEAN or REPLACE BATTERY(s) 



3 — CHANGE PUMP DRIVE GEAR BOX OIL 



800 18 

500 6 



4 — CLEAN & INSPECT AIR PRE-CLEANER 



50 



5 — GREASE CYLINDER PINS 9 4 POINTS 



50 



6 — LUBE BRAKE SLACK ADJUSTERS O 2 POINTS 



100 1 



7 — CHANGE HYDRAULIC SUCTION & STEERING FILTERS 



300 3 



8 — REMOVE & CLEAN PUMP DRIVE BREATHER 



300 3 



9 — CHANGE FUEL STRAINER & AIR COMPRESSOR FILTER 



3C0 3 



10 — CHANGE ECCENTRIC & TORQUE HUB OIL 



SCO 



11 — CHANGE TRANSMISSION OIL & AXLE HOUSING OIL 



500 6 



12 — CHANGE PLANETARY HUB OIL 



500 6 



13 — DRAIN & REFILL RADIATOR WITH ANTI-FREEZE 



1000 12 



14 — CHECK, CHANGE or INSPECT EXHAUST SYSTEM 



800 12 



15 — CHECK or REPLACE STARTER 



1 500 18 



03/10/95 MAINTENANCE REFERENCE COOES 



CODE 0* 



COMPACTION 



I !, 



" 



SEVENSON ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES 
PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE MANUAL 



PG. 6 



.,. TYPE Of 
f^iggi EQUIPMENT 



MAINTENANCE OPERATION 



CODE 



« MAINTENANCE INTERVALS • 

Miles Hrs. Months 



06 RT LOADER 



1 — OIL CHANGE LUBE & FILTER - CLEAN AIR FILTER 



250 2 



2 — CHANGE or CLEAN AIR FILTER 



400 4 



3 — FRONT & REAR DRIVE AXLE OIL CHANGE 



1000 



4 — CLEAN & TEST or REPLACE BATTERY(s) 



900 13 



5 — CLEAN FUEL SEDIMENT TRAP & BCWL 



50 1 



6 — CHANGE AXLE OIL & SYNCRO SHUTTLE OIL 



800 5 



7 — CHANGE HYRAULIC FLUID and FILTER 



900 18 



8 — GREASE WHEEL BEARINGS, BUCKET & DIPPER ARM 



100 3 



9 — CHANGE TRANSMISSION OIL, CLEAN STRAINER 



10 — CLEAN INJECTORS AND TEST 



11 — CHANGE FUEL FILTER 



900 5 



500 4 



400 4 



12 — CHECK TIRES REPAIR or REPLACE AS NEEDED 



850 18 



13 — RE-PACK FRONT WHEEL BEARINGS 



450 3 



14 — CHECK BELT TENSION, REPLACE IF NEEDED 



850 12 



15 — REPLACE STARTER or CHECK OPERATION 



1000 18 



03/ t 0/95 MAINTENANCE REFERENCE COOES 



COOE OS 



RT LOADER 



., 






SEVENSON ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES 
PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE MANUAL 



PG. 10 



*$F 



TYPE OF 
Si EQUIPMENT 



MAINTENANCE OPERATION 



CODE 



» MAINTENANCE INTERVALS • 

Miles Hrs. Months 



10 RT BACKHOE 1 — OIL CHANGE LUBE 4 FILTER 



300 2 



2 — CHANGE AIR CLEANER & HYDRAULIC FILTER 



500 



3 — FRONT & REAR DRIVE AXLE OIL CHANGE 



1000 



4 — CHANGE BRAKE FLUID 



1 800 12 



5 — TAKE ENGINE OIL SAMPLE 



600 



6 — INSPECT TIRE CONDITION FCR CUTS or WEAR 



500 



7 — TURN CUTTING EDGE OR REPLACE IF NEEDED 



1000 



I 



8 — REPAIR CRACKED, FRAYED CR BROKEN WIRING 



250 



9 — CHANGE TRANSMISSION OIL, CLEAN STRAINER 



900 



10 — CLEAN AND TEST INJECTORS 



500 



11 — CHANGE FUEL FILTER 



500 



12 — LUBRICATE REAR AXLE BEARINGS 



500 



13 — CHECK STARTER and ALTERNATOR OPERATION 



800 



14 — BATTERY REPLACEMENT or SERVICE 



1 800 24 



15 — REPLACE STARTER or ALTERNATOR 



1800 24 



03/10/35 MAINTENANCE REFERENCE COOES 



CODE 10 



RT BACKHOE 



SEVENSON ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES 
PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE MANUAL 



PG. 12 



TYPE OF 

IE EQUIPMENT 



MAINTENANCE OPERATION 



CODE 



« MAINTENANCE INTERVALS « 

Miles Hrs. Months 



12 COMPRESSOR 1 — OIL CHANGE and FILTERS 



150 



2 — BLOW OUT and CLEAN AIR FILTERS 



200 2 



3 — INSPECT THE SCAVENGER OIL DRAIN OFF LINE 



1 000 12 



4 — CHECK (3) SAFETY SHUTDOWN SWITCHES 



300 3 



5 — REPACK WHEEL BEARINGS 



750 6 



6 — REPLACE AIR FILTERS 



400 4 



7 — REPLACE BATTERY 



15CO 30 



I 



8 — TAKE ENGINE OIL SAMPLE 



600 6 



9 — INSPECT AND REPAIR, CRACKED OR FRAYED WIRING 



300 3 



10 — CHANGE AIR/OIL SEPARATOR 



1500 18 



11 — DRAIN & RE-FILL COMPRESSOR OIL & CHG. FILTER 



600 6 



12 — CLEAN & TEST BATTERY and CHARGING SYSTEM 



1000 8 



13 — REPLACE WORN or CRACKED BELTS 



600 8 



14 — ALTERNATOR - CHECK or REPLACE 



1000 12 



15 — STARTER - CHECK or REPLACE 



1000 12 



03/10/93 MAINTENANCE REFERENCE COOES 



COPE 12 

COMPRESSOR 



( 



SEVENSCN ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES 
PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE MANUAL 



PG. 13 



TYPE OF 
khEli EQUIPMENT 



MA I NTENANCE OPEPATION 



COPE 



» MAINTENANCE INTERVALS • 

Miles Hrs. Months 



13 DUMP TRUCK 1 — OIL CHANGE, FILTER(s) and DO GREASE JOB 



4,000 



2 — CHECK CLUTCH FOR POSSIBLE REPLACEMENT 



27,000 



18 



3 — FRONT END ALIGNMENT 



15,000 



4 — REPLACE FRONT 120OR X 20 TIRES (7/32 or LESS) 30,000 



13 



5 — DRAIN AIR RESERVOIRS (CHECK FOR OIL) 



4,000 



6 — FLUSH RADIATOR, CHECK HOSES & ADD COOLANT 18,000 



12 



7 — CLEAN & TEST or REPLACE BATTERY(s) 



27,000 



18 



> 



8 — CHECK ALTERNATOR, FAN & WATER PUMP BELTS 



2,000 



9 — TEST STARTER DRAWDOWN (AMP READING) 



10 — CHANGE FUEL FILTER 



5,000 
5,000 



11 — PRESSURE TEST COOLING SYSTEM & CHANGE FILTER 3,000 



12 — BRAKE ADJUSTMENT and CLUTCH ADJUSTMENT 



4,000 



13 — CLEAN & CALIBRATE INJECTORS & FUEL PUMP 



13,000 



12 



14 — REPLACE REAR BRAKES [], FRONT BRAKES [] 27,000 



24 



15 — REPLACE REAR 1100R X 20 TIRES (6/32" or LESS) 18,000 



18 



03/10/35 MAINTENANCE REFERENCE COOES 



COOE 13 



DUMP TRUCK 



SEVENSON ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES 
PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE MANUAL 



PG. 26 



TYPE OF 
^E EQUIPMENT 



P 



MAINTENANCE OPERATION 



CCOE 



« MAINTENANCE INTERVALS ■ 

Miles Hrs. Months 



26 GENERATOR 



1 — OIL CHANGE LUBE & FILTER 



2 — CHECK WIRING REPLACE ALL BURNT OUT LIGHTS 



3 — BLOW OUT / CLEAN or CHANGE AIR CLEANER 



3C0 



4 — CHECK BELT TENSION and WEAR 



5 — SERVICE BATTERY, CLEAN TERMINALS 



6CO 



6 — REPLACE BATTERY 



20C0 36 



7 — REPLACE FUEL FILTER(s) 



6C0 



U 



8 — Item not yet defined. 



9 — Item not yet defined, 



10 — Item not yet defined, 



11 — Item not yet defined, 



12 — Item not yet defined, 



13 — Item not yet defined 



14 — Item not yet defined. 



15 — Item not yet defined, 



03/10/35 MAINTENANCE REFERENCE COOES 



COPE 2S 

GENERATOR 



(\ 



Lubricant Sampling Instructions 



when to Sample 
_rigines — Just prior to oil drain — 
consult your ssuipmen; operator's 
manual for cnar.ge inte-.al 
recommennaticr.s. 
Mechanical Transmissions. 
OiMerentiais. Final Drive'Planetary — 
Jus: prior :o oil Grain, rut at least 
every SCC .-.Curs of cpera:ion. Par nor 
:es: tr.sn 3 :;rr.es ar.nusiiy. 

Hydraulic Systems. ?ow»r Shift 
Transmissions — Just C'tcr to oil drain 
Out at least ever/ SCO ncurs of 
ooe ration Pur no less :r.sn 3 times 
annua tty. 

Where to Sample 

IMPORTANT: Insure t.-.a: the system 

ycu are samoiinc r.as ceen well 
circulated in crcer to cct2in a true 
"roreser.tative same'e. Cir; and 
System ceor-.s ter.c to settle cut to tne 
eottcm of tne reservoir, wnile water 
arc ligr.t !ue:s tend tc ''-cat on tne 
=ubricant. Draw lusrtca.*: samo'es 
immediately after shutdown for a 
reoresentative test result. Always take 
■> ^mpi^s in tne same manner. 

V'arning: Clear, all lucr-.ca.nt access 
areas prior to sampling. Assemoie 
sampling tcois and materials in a 
c!e.=.r. area. Follow tnese precautions 
'.C eliminate any contaminants from 
*nte.'ino the samcii 
svstem reser.' 



; -g tools. Oottte or 





Mechanical Transmissions 
Differentials. Final Drive/PJanetary — 
To cotain luoricant sample tne 
systems must Oe at operating 
temperature. Oraw luoricant sample 
tnrcugh oil level c.neck point or 
tnrougn Cipsticx retaining tuoe 
wnicnever is proviced. Consult your 
equiomenc ccerator s manual for 
these iccaticns. 







lngir.es — To oOtain engine oil 
ia.-ncie engine must Oe at operating 
".emperature. Draw Iubr<c3.nt sample • 
tnrougn the dipstick retaining tupe. ; ;^ r y 
^cner take samples from a drain pa'n : ~ 
or at tne drain plug. '• ;• . . ( :: r v]jL 



^ 



Hydraulic Systems — To oOtain 
hydraulic fluid sample, the system 
must be at operating temperature. 
Draw fluid sample through the "oil 
fill" port of the system reservoir. 
Insure that the sample is drawn from 
the mid-level of the reservoir. 

5-e sure the sample ycu take is a 
representative luce sampie cf the 
reservoir condition and is not Oeing 
taken (rem the insice c.' a corner, c* 
filter element. (Example some Poclain 
Excavators) 

CAUTION: Some hydraulic reservoirs 
are pressurized. Refeave pres-sure 
before sampling. Engine should no; Oe 
"operated when a pressurized system is 
• opened. Consult your equipment 
.operator's manual for hydraulic 
i system precautions. 




Power Shift Transmissions — To 
oct2in luoricant samcie the 
transmission must Pe at ooerating 
temperature. Draw lucncant sample 
from oil ievei plug, or tnrougn dipst" 
retaining tuoe. wnicnever is provide 
Consult your equipment operator's 
manual lor tr.is location. 




'-±^St^ 



^ 



Final Drives — (For equipment with 

final dnve luce reservoir indecer.de 
from all ether systems). Final drives 
must be at operating temperature. 
Draw lubricant sample from oil teve 
plug. Consult your ecuipment 
operator's manual for this location. 

Combined Systems — Some off-lh= 
roaC agricultural and construction, 
equipment have one common 
reservoir for tne hydraulic system, 
transmission, final drive/differentia. 
For these types of systems, we 
recommend tne use of oil sampling 
No. 2 for complete lubricant anaiys 
All systems must be at operating 
temperature. Oraw lubricant samcie 
from the oil level plug, sight gauge 
through dipstick retaining tube 
whichever is orovided. Consult yc^- 
equipment operator's manual for 
these locations. ..... •*.. 



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2. 1 Automated Repair Order and Equipment Inspection Report - Sample 



J JOB Number ? 3/10/95 

JOB SUPERINTENDENT, 

REGARDING THE ATTACHED REPAIR ORDER #'s, 2136, *##*, #### 

The items listed on the repair orders come up automatically 

based on elapsed hours, miles or months for each specific maintenance 

item. 

1) If you actually complete each item, CHECK it off as done. 

2) If the item is inspected and determined to be in satisfactory 
condition, MARK it as "OK". 

3) Complete the inspection report on the right, check 

off the filters used, SIGN the repair order and return to me. 

4) Please note the number of days or hours in which 
REGULAR SERVICE is due, and schedule these services 
accordingly. 

5) Attach any related paper work from outside vendors to the 
repair orders. 




Jim( Augustynek 



enclsr. Repair Orders 

Service Schedule 



<b 



Sevenson 



03 / 1 0/9 5 



AUTOMATED REPAIR ORDER 



t J 



^.JlPMENTNO: 



411-E 



WRITTEN BY: 



R.O. NO. 



DATE 



02186 



/ / 



DESCRIPTION: 



D31E-18 KOMATSU DOZER 1988 
TYPE OF SERVICE: 



HRS: 



MILES: 



INSTRUCTIONS 



CHECK: DONE or OK 



TAKE FINAL DRIVE OIL SAMPLES 

REPLACE UNDERCARRAGE 

HYDRAULIC TANK - CHANGE OIL & FILTER 

REPLACE AIR FILTERS 

TURN PINS AND BUSHINGS OR MEASURE WEAR 
CHANGE TRANSMISSION OIL" and FILTER 
BACK UP ALARM - REPLACE [] or "OK" [] 

REPLACE or FLIP DOZER BLADE CUTTING EDGE 



in. 
-A 



PART* 



" 



DESCRIPTION 



PRICE 



EXTENSION 



BT536 
P3788 



RA2418FN 
! PA2305 



zL/. 



./ . 



13-60-43321 t_j 



OIL FILTER 

Primary FUEL FILTER 

Secondary FUEL 

Primary AIR FILTER 

Secondary AIR 

TRANSMISSION 

HYDRAULIC 

COOLANT 



C-/ ■ 



ENGINE. . . 
TIRES 



KAC 6D95L-1 



s/N 40197 



2.4 Gal . 1J5W-40 EXXON XD3 & GREASE 

I 
Gal . Hydraul ic Oil USED ? 



EQUIPMENT INSPECTION 

REPORT 

YARD 



JOB NO: 
OPERATOR 
JOB SUPT. . 



INSPECT AND CHECK CONDITIONS 


PASS 


nee: 

3E?A. 


AIR FILTERS 


□ 


1 ! 


SWING GEAR BOX 


□ 


\ ! 


TIRE CONDITION 


a 


! 


BOOM CONDITION 


a 





HOSE CONDITION 


G 


i ' 


GAUGE CONDITION 


a 


! !_ 


ENGINE CONDITION 


I □ 


J 


RADIATOR 


H 


r™~ 


TORQUE CONVERTER 


a 


~™ 


TRANSMISSION CONDITION 


a 


: r 


ENGINE CLUTCH 


| a 


i 


FINAL DRIVE 


D 


;~™ 


DIFFERENTIALS 


D 


G 


BACK UP ALARM 


i H 


G 


STEERING 


1 G 


G 


BRAKES 


1 C 


: G 


OPERATING CONTROLS 


1 * 


G 


LOADER ASSEMBLY 


I G 


i™— 













i 


I i 

i 




Hast Serviced 

at MIL E3 

|'| 3, 403 hrs . 


1 . 


8 Mor 


iths 

I 

i 

! 


Ago 

\ 

: 



HYDRAULIC SYSTEM 



BLADE EQUIPMENT 



LIGHTS 3. ELECTRICAL SYSTEM 



CA3 4 GLASS CONDITION 



UNDERCARRIAGE CONDITION 



EXHAUST SYSTEM 



ACCESSORIES IN CAB 



GREASE GUN 



FIRE EXTINGUISHER 



TRACK SPADE 



inspection Completed 



G ! G 



i i 



a g 



G G 



YES iV 



I I 



P 



COMMENTS 



Esuioment Repair Comcieted 
Reaav To Worn 



2.2 Preventive Maintenance Service Schedule - Sample 



v> 



) 



SEVENSON 



Preventive Ma in tenance " SERVICE SCHEDULE' 



Pq. 1 



March 10, 95 



JOB SITE : 361 

U.S. ARMY (PHASE III) 
MONTECLAIR, N.J. 





( ASAP ) Service within 1 week, appr 

(~OverDue). . .350 Hours or 5500 Miles or 


oaching the 250 elapsed hours or 

(1) Year since last PM. 

tlv OVER DUE ON HOURS, or Miles 


4000 miles 










LAST 


EQ.NO. 


DESCRIPTION 
PC-90 EXCAVATOR 




LAST 
SERVICED 

01/24/95 


REGULAR SERVICE IS DUE IN. . . 


SERVICE 

READING 

HRS or MI 


8639 




50 DAYS or 


108 HH3. 


117 


11 ** 


FORD LTD WAGON 


** 


11/22/94 ** ASAP 


DAYS or 


HRS. 


69, 993 


103-E 


BLUE CHEVY PICK UP (R) 




12/27/94 




22 DAYS or 


HRS . 


125,343 


171 


CHEV 5 77V DUMP 




12/28/94 




23 DAYS or 


HRS . 


10,800 


226-E 


FORD LT 9000 " (R) 




12/28/94 




23 DAYS or 


83 HRS. 


I 6,445 


227-E 


FORD LT 9000 




12/28/94 




23 DAYS or 


110 HRS. 


6, 758 


228-E 


FORD LT 9000 




12/28/94 




23 DAY3 or 


173 HR3 . 


! 4,324 


%)%&.-£ 


FORD LT 9000 




12/28/94 




23 DAYS or 


65 HR3. 


! 3, 036 


235-E ** 


FORD LT 9000 (R) 


** 


12/28/94 ** 


23 OAYS or 


-44 HRS . 


8, 082 


243-1 


MACK TRACTOR GUZZLER 




01/24/95 




50 DAYS or 


1 64 HRS. 


870 


244-1 


MACK TRACTOR GUZZLER 




01/24/95 




50 DAYS or 


163 HRS . 


! 5, 002 


305-1 


GUZZLER 16" VAC UNIT 




02/27/95 




84 DAYS or 


223 hrs. 


\ 3, 982 


306-1 


GUZZLER 16" VAC UNIT 




02/28/95 




85 DAY3 or 


231 HRS. 


\ 4,004 


314-E 


IR VIBRATORY TAMPER 




12/30/94 




25 OAYS or 


250 HRS. 




330-E 


DX-70 IR VIBRATORY ROLLER 

* OUE ON TIME 


03/22/94 

ONLY 




DAYS or 


250 HRS. 


I 400 


386-E 


TOYOTA SKIDSTEER SDKS 




12/03/94 




0AY3 or 


205 HR3. 


2, 184 


386 EB 


60" TOYOTA SDK8 BRCCM 




08/30/94 




OAYS or 


250 HR3. 




388-E 


TOYOTA SKIDSTEER SDK- 10 




02/23/95 




80 DAYS or 


218 HRS. 


\ 3, 346 


419-E 


D31E-17 KCMATSU DOZER 




08/12/94 




0AY3 or 


139 HR3. 


! 5, 465 


440- E 

) 

442-E 


CASE 580K BACKHOE 




02/23/95 




80 OAYS or 


197 HRS. 


I 3, 534 


J.D. 410c BACKHOE 




02/23/95 




80 OAYS or 


192 HRS. 


I 5, 198 


446 E3 


36" PC-80 Bucket 




/ / 




OAYS or 


250 HRS. 


\ 1 



RETURN ALL MAINTENANCE INFORMATION UPDATES TO THE GARAGE OFFICE * Attention, Jim 



SSVENSCN 



Preventive Maintenance " SERVICE SCHEDULE' 



Pp. 2 



March 10, 95 



JOB SITE : 361 

U.S. ARMY (PHASE III) 
MONTECLAIR, N.J. 



i) 





( ASAP ) Service within 1 week, appi 

(~OverDue). . .350 Hours or 5500 Miles or 


"oach ing 
(1) Year 
ttly OVER 


the 250 elapsed hours or 
since last PM. 
DUE ON HOURS, or Mi les 


4000 miles 








LAST 


EQ.NO. 


DESCRIPTION 
** PC- 120-3 KOMATSU BACKHOE 


LAST 
SERVICED 

** "Overdue < 


REGULAR SERVICE IS DUE IN... 


SERVICE 
READING 

HRS or MI 


448-E 


'* ASAP 


DAYS or -125 HRS. ! 


8,010 


502 


GROVE RT513 CRANE 


02/1 7/95 




74 DAYS or 200 HRS. 


1,384 


504-E 


GROVE RT520 CRANE 


02/07/95 




64 OAYS or 226 HRS. 


7,226 


605-E 


MILLER 14" FLOOR SAW 


03/22/94 




DAYS or 250 HRS. 




817-E 


IR 185 COMPRESSOR 

~ OUE ON TIME 


"OverDue 

ONLY 




DAYS or 155 HRS. 


1,408 


819-E 


MULTIQUIP 180 COMPRESSOR 


09/29/94 




DAYS or 72 HRS. 


1 , 534 


920-E 


HONDA 2500 GENERATOR 


03/22/94 




DAY3 or 250 HRS. 




940-E 

) 


HONDA 6500WT GENERATOR 

" DUE ON TIME 


"OverDue 

ONLY 




OAYS or 250 HRS . 


\ 1,200 




Please send NEXT updated EQUIPMENT HOUR LOGS in 


by March 26, 95 





> 



RETURN ALL MAINTENANCE INFORMATION UPDATES TO THE GARAGE OFFICE * Attention, Jim 



\ 

2.3 Monthly Equipment Hour Log Report - Sample 



) 



) 



MONTHLY EQUIPMENT HOUR LOG REPORT. . .use for April 09, 95 



REPORT DATE 



SERVICE SCHEDULE 



March 10, 95 



) 



JOB SITE : 361 

U.S. ARMY (PHASE III) 
MONTECLAIR, N.J. 



Mi leage & Hour Log 



» Denotes , "Equipment Schedu 7 ed on Site" UPDATE 

CURRENT 
EQ.NO. DESCRIPTION Mi./Hrs. 



NOTES 



8639 PC-90 EXCAVATOR 

11 FORD LTD WAGON 

1 03-E BLUE CHEVY PICK UP (R) 

171 CHEV 5 77V DUMP 

226-E FORD LT 9000 (R) 

227-E FORD LT 9000 

228-E FORD LT 9000 

232-E FORD LT 9000 

235-E FORD LT 9000 (R) 

243-1 MACK TRACTOR GUZZLER 

244-1 MACK TRACTOR GUZZLER 

305-1 GUZZLER 16" VAC UNIT 

306-1 GUZZLER 16" VAC UNIT 

314-E IR VIBRATORY TAMPER 

330-E DX-70 IR VIBRATORY ROLLER 

386-E TOYOTA SKIDSTEER SDKS 

386 EB 60" TOYOTA SDK8 BROOM 

388-E TOYOTA SKIDSTEER SDK-10 

419-E D31E-17 KOMATSU DOZER 

440-E CASE 580K BACKHOE 

442-E J.D. 410c BACKHOE 

446 EB 36" PC-80 Bucket 

448-E PC- 120-3 KOMATSU BACKHOE 

502 GROVE RT518 CRANE 

504- E GROVE RT520 CRANE 

605-E MILLER 14" FLOOR SAW 

817-E IR 135 COMPRESSOR 

819-E MULTIOUIP 180 COMPRESSOR 

920-E HONDA 2500 GENERATOR 

940-E HONDA 6500WT GENERATOR 



** OverDue on Hours 



4009 



4023 



** OverDue on Hours 



> 



) 

2.4 Computer Screen Format for Preventive Maintenance Information - Sample 



) 



> 



03/10/95 



NumCaps 



DISPLAY or EDIT ...Last PM Information 
411 D31E-18 KOMATSU DOZER 



ai r 
Number 



Descr i pt ion 



1 
2 
3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

1 1 

12 

13 

14 

15 



ENGINE OIL CHANGE and FILTER 

CHECK STEERING CLUTCH OPERATION & OIL LE 

REPLACE BELTS [] ' CHECK HERE IF "OK" [] 

TAKE FINAL DRIVE OIL SAMPLES 

CHECK STARTER & ALTERNATOR FOR REPLACEME 

REPLACE UNDERCARRAGE 

TEST & CLEAN or REPLACE BATTERY(s) 

HYDRAULIC TANK - CHANGE OIL & FILTER 

COMPLETE GREASE JOB and CHECK HOSE CONDI 

REPLACE AIR FILTERS 

TURN PINS AND BUSHINGS OR MEASURE WEAR 

CHANGE TRANSMISSION OIL and FILTER 

BACK UP ALARM - REPLACE [] or "OK" [] 

TAKE ENGINE OIL SAMPLE 

REPLACE or FLIP DOZER BLADE CUTTING EDGE 



Date 


Hours 


Mi 1 es 


Done 


Done 


Done 


01/16/95 


3403 





01/16/95 


3403 





09/27/94 


3233 





03/06/95 


3427 





01/16/95 


3403 





/ / 








01/16/95 


3403 





03/06/95 


3427 





01/16/95 


3403 





03/06/95 


3427 





02/22/93 


2373 





03/06/95 


3427 





03/06/95 


3427 





01/16/95 


3403 





03/06/95 


3427 






o 



03/10/95 




£&** 



O 




Notes or Special Repairs Completed 
411 D31E-18 KOMATSU DOZER 



Page 1 



Descr i pt i on 



SERVICED ® IRONTON, OHIO 
ALL OILS CHANGED 
R+R Frt.Seal in Hyd.Pump 
GREEN TAGGED for E306 
BATTERIES CHECK, GREEN TAGGED 
Rebuilt Track Adjuster Cyl. 
Winterize -40; RESEAL LIFT CYL 
FINAL, BEVEL+STEERING OIL CHG'd 
R+R BLADE TRUNION & PAINTED 



Open Date 

06/05/93 
08/13/93 
01/03/94 
03/03/94 
07/13/94 
08/17/94 
09/27/94 
01/16/95 
03/01/95 



Close Date 

06/05/93 
08/13/93 
01/03/94 
03/03/94 
07/13/94 
08/17/94 
09/27/94 
01/16/95 
03/06/95 



ARO No 

603 
747 
1 131 
1285 
1595 
1695 
1793 
2057 
2186 



) 



3.0 Identification of Equipment 

Excavation - Crawler Dozer Komatsu D31E 

- Hydraulic Excavator PC200 

- Wheel Loader WA450 

- Rubber tire Backhoe Loader JCB1400 

Screening and - Shredder Screening Plant Kolberg 217 

Stabilization - Portable Hydraulic Conveyors Kolberg Series 2 

- Weighbelt Feeder Riede WBF-IC 

- Portec Model 52 Pugmill 



O 



I 






) 

3.1 Designated Equipment Performance Specifications with Standard Operating Procedures 

The attached manufacturer specification sheets are for the equipment as designated in Section 
3.0. 



U 



1 



HKOMATSU 

KGMATSU MASXc'IMG I.'jIS.C 




Mccs! si~cwn may include optional equipment 



KOMATSU: The Quality is Standard. 

FLYWHEEL HORSEPOWER: 123HP : 2050 RPM. BUCKET CAPACITY: .40-1. 17m J (.50-1.53 yd 3 ). 
OPERATING WEIGHT: 19439kg (42.S60 lb) WITH LC UNDERCARRIAGE: 19730kg (43,500 lb). 



i Working Ticce seiecvc- 
• CL33 svste- zzrz^---. 
• " 3 :.%er -n ' 3u": _ 



.c.;^ i, 



— : 5 s.'-j - ~eutral 'or actional fuel savings 
: • : :■" z'z^rz :c-Git:cns arc ccerator selection 



• 3C3C:CUS. 



re 'z : _ e rce r a:cr's ccmrcr: a-c productivity 
-z^ .~z: ens at /cur fingertips 
:'-?i£rc ift;ng cacacues. 



■^^B^3^^BBB5S^^^SB^^^BBB3^^^ 



The New Frontier of Technology 

(EQUALLED PERFORMANCE AND FUEL ECONOMY 

Puma and Engine Mutual Control System 

A - ctc:::es3C' automatically adjusts engine speed and pump output for 

~a:< ~-~ - -e: efficiency .-. trrout sacrificing productivity. 

FOUR WORKING MOOES 

General Operations Mode. Start the engine and you're in this mode ready 
: cr v.z cai cacing and cc< cigging aoplications with up to 17% better job ef- 
ficiency than mcs; leading competitors. 

Finish Operations Mode, jsa this mode for fast, smooth cycling in leveling 
:.- gracing operations with -crease improvements in overall efficiency. 
Lifting Operations Mode, "he best mode 
for e<ra fine occm. arm arc bucket con- 
::ci -ecui-ec fcr cice setting and lifting and 
sect ~z ;ccs. 

Heavy Duty Operations Mode. This 
mcce gives an instant 2G : : power boost 
over tne general —cce. Use : t as needed 
tc 3teo uo orcducticn whiie maintaining 
*co cceratcn efficiencv. 



-gme 



Puna 



IT 



s\ 



Microorocessof 



! 



\ Centra levers 



i Swing motor 
I Travel motors 



sWACC 



Inclement 
C/lincsrs 



: -»ei control olal 




Electronic Monitor and Control 
Console (EMACC) 

The EMACC puts all system controls 
and display functions within easy view 
and reach of the operator. The console 
can also be rotated through three posi- 
tions to provide the best, glare-free 
viewing angle. 



The EMACC Consists of: 

• Working Modes 

• Rower Mcdes: Three modes (H. S 
ana U are automatically set in ac- 
corcance with the working moce. 
Manual reset is also possible. 

• Autoceceieration 

• Monitor: constantly checks machine 5 
condition 

Rre-start level checks 
Fuel gauge 

Coolant temperature gauge 
Caut:cn .terns: cociant level anc tem- 
perature, fuel level, oil pressure, arc 
charge system 

• La-Hi travel sceed selector 

• Swing lcc< :nc;catcr 

• Wiper controls: intermittent or 
:on::nucus 

• -eater fan control 








<. ' 3utton 
-e - : hare 
: ■. er max 
-;-eases 
- - o o c '.'• e ' 
: : _ at'ons 




SPECIFICATIONS 







Komatsu S6D95L 4-cycle. water-cooled, turbocharged diesel 
engine with 5 cylinders. 95 mm (3.74") bore x 115 mm 
(4.53") stroke and 4.89 ltr (298 in 1 ) piston displacement 

Flywheel horsepower 123 HP @ 2050 RPM 

The engine features direct injection for fuel economy, a me- 
chanical all-speed governor, forced lubrication with a full-flow 
filter, dry-type air cleaner with'dust indicator and automatic 
dust evacuator, 24 V/5.5 kw starting system with 25A alterna- 
tor, 2 x 12V/110 Ah batteries. 



^j| HYDRAULIC SYSTEM 



Two variable caoacity piston pumps and independent swing 
operation assure smooth compound movements of the work 
equipment. The Pump and Engine Mutual Control (PEMC) 
system controls the engine speed and pump output for maxi- 
mum fuel efficiency and productivity. The Open-center Load 
Sensing System (OLSS) controls the pumps for efficient use of 
engine power, rebuced hydraulic losses during operation, and 
low fuel consumption. _=-.- 

Two variable-capacity piston pumps power boom, arm, 
bucket swing and '.ravel circuits. One gear pump powers pilot 
control circuits. 
Pump capacities (discharge flow © 2050 engine RPM): 

Piston 190 ltr (50 U.S. gal) min x 2 

Gear 50 itr (1 3 U.S. gal) min 

Hydraulic motors: 

Travel Two axial piston motors with parking brake 

Swing One axial piston motor with swing holding brake 

Relief valve settings: 

Implement circuits 325 kg/cm 2 (4,620 psi) 

Swing circuit 275 kg/cm 2 (3,910 psi) 

Pilot circuit 30 kg/cm 2 ( 430 psi) 

Travel circuit 340 kg/cm 2 (4,830 psi) 

Control valves: 

-i-spool anc 5-scccl valves with a ser/ice valve 

No. of cylinders — bore x stroke: 

Boom 2-120 mm x 1235 mm (4.7" x 4'2") 

Arm 1-135 mm x U90 mm (5.3" x 4'10") 

Bucket 1-115 mm x 1120 mm (4.5" x 3'8") 



STEERING 



Steering/traveling controls are activated with either hand lev- 
ers or foot pedals. Pushing both levers (or pedals) moves 
machine forward. Pulling them back makes machine go into 
reverse. Setting one lever (or pedal) in neutral and the other in 
forward enables machine to make a pivot turn. Pushing one 
forward wnile pulling the other backward makes machine 
counterrotate on the spot. 




Fully hydrostatic drive with each track cowered by an axial 
piston motor. Power gees thrcugn a ccuble-reduction plane- 
tar/ gear to the track. 
STANDARD UNOERCARRIAGE 
Maximum drawcar pull 17700 kg (39,020 lb) 



Maximum travel speed 5.5 krn/h (3.4 MPH) 

LC UNDERCARRIAGE 

Maximum drawbar pull 17700 kg (39,020 lb) 

Maximum travel speed 5.5 km/h (3.4 MPH) 




Eacn travel motor is equipped with a brake valve that lessens 
shock when applied, and limits speed during descent. The 
wet, muitiple-disc brakes actuate on the final-drive input shaft 
and automatically lock when the travel/steering levers ancVcr 
pedals are in neutral. 



SWING SYSTEM 



The swing system is powered by a hydraulic driven motcr 
through spur and planetary gears. Single-row, shear type bail 
bearings with induction-hardened internal gears are built into 
the swing circle. Grease-bathed swing pinion, electric swing 
lock and swing holding brake are provided. Swing speed is 
proportional to swing control lever stroke. 

Max. swing speed 13 RPM 

Tail-swing radius 27C0 mm ( 8'10") 

Min. swing radius 3775 mm (1 1 '11 ") 

(work equipment, fully retracted) 



UNDERCARRIAGE 



X-!eg type center frame is integrally welded with reinforcec 
box-section track frames. The design includes sealea tracks 
lubricated rollers and idlers, hydraulic track adjusters with 
sheck absorbing springs, and assemcled track-type trace 
shces with triple grousers. 
STANDARD UNDERCARRIAGE 

Shoe width 700 mm (27.5 '" 

Grouser height 25 mm (1 * 

Number of snoes (each side) -- 

Number of carrier rollers (each side) '- 

Number of track rollers (each side) ~ 

Ground pressure 0.39 kg/cm J / (5.60 psi 

LC UNDERCARRIAGE 

Shoe width "CO mm (27.5 " 

Grouser height 25 mm (1 " 

Number of shoes (eacn side) -- : 

Numoer of carrier rollers (each side) - 

Number of track rollers (each side) . . . .-.' : 

Grcund pressure 0.36 kg/cm 2 (5.13 ps: 



SERVICE REF1LLCAPACIT1ES 



Fuel tank 310 Itr (82 U.S. ga 

Coolant 15 ltr (4.0 U.S. ga 

Engine 18 Itr (5.0 U.S. ga 

Final drive (each side) 3 ltr (2 U.S. ga 

Swing drive 9 ltr (2.3 U.S. ga 

Hydraulic oil 1 70 Itr (45 U.S. ga 



OPERATING WEIGHT 



Including 5700 mm (18'3") one-piece boom. 2925 mm (9 . 
arm. 0.30 m J (1.0 yd 3 ) backhce bucket, ccerator, lubrica 

coolant and full fuel tank T9-i39 kg (42,360 

with LC UNOERCARRIAGE 19720kg (43,500 



with arm extension 







i 1 30 m i5'11*) arm | 


J.«0m (7'10-) 


urn 


2.93 m |9T) arm | 


••J 06 m (13-4-) arm | 


/enqui 




i 9390 mm (30-10-) | 


9435 mm (30 - 1t-) 




9330 mm (30 9') 


9330 mm (3Q9*) | 


Lsng-Ji on ground (transccrt) 


1 =C2C0 


1 5235 mm (207-) 


5715mm (139*) 




4370 mm (161 


4120 mm (13-5") 


; ; C2CCLC 


1 5475 mm (21T) 


:9G5 mm (19'4*) 




:C60mm (15 9') 


4310 mm (142*) 


Overall r.e-.gnt Co too Ol :com) 




3CC5 mm 19*10"*) 


OCiO mm (101 




2940 mm |9S") 


3170 mm (10'*) 



1 -02CO-5 ! ?C2CCLC-5 


Overall *iO'ai Z730 nan (9*1 "J | .- 3C80 mm (10'1*) 


Overall rieiqni 
'o too ol :ao) 


2860 mm (9'5*) 


2360 mm (9'5*) 


Grouno clearance. 
counier*eigfit 


1075 .mm (3'S*) 


1075 mm (3-6*) 


Win. grouno clearance «0 mm (V5") 440 mm (V5") 


"ail swing racius 2700 **m i.S'10*) 27C0 mm |3'1Q-) 


Ljngtn ot rracx on -.round 32SC mm (10-8") 36J0 mm [11*11") 


"racx lenrjsn I 4070 ~m (13-*-) \ 44«o mm (147*) | 


"racx gauge i 2130 mm (7 2') 2330 mm (7-10*) 


Widin of crawler i 2780 mm (9'1") ■ 2C80 mm (10'1") 


Shoe wiain SCO .-r.m (24-) 7CO mm (27.5*) 


Grouser neignt 25 r.m (1*) 25 mm (1") 


Mac-jne cao neignt 1 2055 mm (6 9*) 2C55 mm (S'9*) 


Macnme cao wiatn | 2430 mm (8-2*) 2*30 mm (3-2*) 


S^'no 7 "" 19 :int8f 2S5 ° ~ m (8 ""*"* | 26SS mm (8 ' 10 "> 



o 



1 K ! 

— O.L 1 




isole 

•I 

ivs, 

J. 

iat. 

ler, 



WORKING RANGE 





'..30 m (511*) arm 1 


2. 4Q m 7'10") arm | 


2.93 m (9'7*) arm | 


■4.06 m (13-4*) arm | 


Max. :igg:ng *.e:gnt 


3395 mm i29'2*) 


9050 mm |29'3*) 


92S0 mm (20' 5') 


9700 mm (3T10*) 


Max. :umcmg 


' 3065 mm (13'1*-) | 


5255 mm (20'S*) 


5450 mm (2V2*) 


5970 mm (22 - 10') 


\ ^igginq :eSBl 


i 5535 mm (132*) 


50S5 mm (20-) 


£620 mm (2T9*) 


7725 mm (25'4*) 


. Max. verncai *a;i 
! ciggmg ceotn 


i 4965 mm 1,15 3*) 


5315 mm (17 5 ') 


5930 mm (19'7*) 


7075 mm (23'3*) 


'. Max. digging ceotn 
of cut tor 3" evei 


I 5160 mm (*5'11*) 


5340 mm (19'2-) 


5-135 mm (21 '1*) 


7590 mm (24'11*) | 


Max. :iggrrg -eacn 


39:5 mm i29'3*l 


9395 Tim (30--I0-) 


. 9875 mm |32'5'l 


:C330 mm (35'3") 


Max. :igg:ng -e3c*. 


! 3720 mm (237*) 


92C5 mm <30'2-) 


| 97CCmm (31 '10") 


•0705 mm (35'1 ') 


Min fAirg -sc.us 


364Q mm (11 !1*) 


• 3710mm 112**H 


3630 mm (1*1**1 1*") 


2530 mm [inrj 


~<i'. ciggmg - orce 


•42C0'; 

(31.3*0.31 


12500 <g 
(27.560 lb) 


12500 <q 
(27.560 IB) 


1 25CO <q 
(27.560 lb) 


"3 crowd 'orce 


T2SC0 <g 
(27.730 S) 


n2C0<g 
(24.590 lb) 


i 1 CCCO <q 
(22.050 lo) 


7390 <q 
(17.390 lb) 




■ 9'7* arm witn 3'9" arm extension 




Cacac.rv 

■a- !ya : ) 

SA=. =C3A 

*?acec 



Wicitri --*, (in) 



Weigni <q (lb) 



Nitnaut .vi tn without *vitti 

3.ce cuttars 5iC8 cutters l side cutters ! s.Ge cutters 



Mo. of 
teetn 



VRMS 



1.3m (5'H") 2. in (7'11*)| 2.9<t, (97") *4.Cm (13'4") \ 



1.05(1.37) i 1320(52.4) '435(55.5) I 520(1.367) 630 (1.434) | 



= *i 



(1.53) 



!450 (57.1) 



:60 (1.455) j 



Q 50 (0.59) 



510 (24) 



712 (23) 



5!2(1.3S0)| 542(1.417) 



50 (0.31) 



Ml (23) 



313 (32) 



525 (1.380) ! 535 (1.447) 



30 (1.0) 



333 (33) 



940 (37) 



730 (1.720) i 310 (1.737) j 



Q 30 (1.19) ! 365 (33) "C67 (45) j 


312(1.790): 342(1.357); 


5 




■* 


- 


A 


X 


BC 3 ■ 40 (0.50) '; 5iQ (24) 560 (25) 


375 (1.467) i . 535 (1.534) I 


4 




r 


- 


- 


! : : 


lz~ \ 3 50 (0.75) 727 (29) "37 (31) 


'17(1.532)1 743(1.550); 


4 




- 


- 


- 


I . 7 


■ Zir, :e isea .vitn a .material .v~!<*nt -X ': 3 C4Q !•■•/-■■ 
•Cofi :e usea .vitn a material .veignt iz :c 2.520 5/ya 1 
• Can :e usee .vitn i matsrai .ve:gn: jC. :o 2.220 b/yc : 


x • "let useacie 

: - L.gnt cur/ acciica; 


ions 


oniy 












! 



he New Frontier of Quality 






EASY AND 

COMFORTABLE 

OPERATION 



Automatic Hi-Lo Travel Speed 
Travel soeeb is automatically shifted 



"Hi" or "Lo," depending 



Quality Improvements Include: 

• Added filters and radiator dust- 
resistant screening to keep the 
hydraulic system clean and 
cool. 

• Double lock electronic connec- 
tors and in-cab mounted elec- 
tronic microprocessor provide 
increased reliability and protec- 
tion from the elements. 

Automatic Warm-Up System 

Engine speed is automatically 
controlled by the microprocessor 
when coolant temperature is low 
for fast, fuel efficient and reliable 
engine warm-up. 

Engine Overheat Prevention 

Should the coolant temperature 
rise above desired levels, pump 
output and engine speed are re- 
duced, preventing damage to the 
engine. 

Other Performance-Proven 
Features 

• OLSS (Open-Center Load Sens- 
ing System) reduces hydraulic' 
losses. 

• Autodeceleration boosts fuel 
economy. 

• Swing holding brake makes 
working on slopes much easier. 

• Car-like operator's cab 

• X-leg frame for excellent 
stability. 

• Merged circuits shorten cycle 
times. 

• Straight travel circuits facilitate 
simultaneous work equipment/ 
travel operations. . ■ 






Fuel Control Dial 

~~e easy :o use dial ma'^.es ac:us: r 

Engine Key Stop 

~c s:cc :~e engine, simply "urn the : 

Spacious Cab 

The roomy, efficient cao design has 

as '.veil as slicing front anc s;ce w.nc 

Adjustable Wrist Control Levers 

Unit-red whs: control levers a-a ar~ 

wor:< ocs;::cns fcr maximum cce-3.:: 

,v:s: controls 'ecuce cce-a: ~z e -- : 

Adjustable Operator's Seat 
~~e "_'iv ac,us:acie suspense" s-rB 
3oom Lock Valve 
The zcc~ circuit is ecuipcec •••• :~ :- 
;c z"~. c ; :.~e .vork ecu'.prne~: 
Swing Lock 
"he =-.v -o can be '.cc'iz l c ■■-.- iz 



:i< and effortless. 



'c excellent visibility, 
: iation. 

.5:ec through three 
:ocr*.icnal pressure 
"e : se '.vcrk ecuip- 



:s:~"z r.-z :cm ; crt. 

c . a •. e :o prevent hydrau- 




ioiustacie «"« cancel lever 






I 



STANDARD EQUIPMENT 

• 24 V/5.5 kW electric starting motor 

• 25 A alternator 

• 12 V/110 Ah x 2 batteries 

• Dry-type air cleaner with auto dust 
fcvacuator and dust indicator 
Proportional Pressure hydraulic control 

• Electronic Open-Center Load Sensing 
System and Pump Engine Mutual 
Control system 

• Boom holding valve 

• Autodeceleration 

• Power maximizing system : 

• Power mode selection system 

• Working mode selection system 

• Service valve 



OPTIONAL EQUIPMENT 

• Air conditioner 

• Fuel supply pump 

• Double air cleaner element 

• 35A alternator 

• Head guard 

• Track frame undercover 

• Rearview mirror (LH) 



Automatic Hi-Lo travel 
Gauge protector, fuel tank 
Engine overheat prevention system 
Automatic engine warm-up system 
Automatic deaeration system for fuel 
line 

700 mm (28") triple-grouser shoes 
Track guiding guards (each side) 
Hydraulic track adjusters 
1 3350 kg (7,387 lb) counterweight 

• Suction fan. cooling 

1 Radiator 4 oil cooler with dustproof net 
' In-line filter 

• Revolving frame under guards 



• Warning lights for swing 

• Tool kit 

• Hydraulic control unit (1) 

• 50' super long front (boom, arm, 
bucket linkage) 

• 0.48 yd 3 bucket for long front 



Centralized greasing (work equip. 4 

swing) 

Electric horn 

• Front light (1) 

' Rearview mirror (RH) 

• Vandalism protection locks 

• Electronic Monitor and Control Console 

• All-weather sound suppressed steel 
cab (with tinted safety glass windows, 
pull-up type front window with lock 
device, removable lower windshield, 
lattice guard, lockable door, floor mat, 
intermittent window wiper and washer, 
adjustable suspension seat with 
armrest, cigarette lighter, ashtray, 
heater and defroster) 



OPTIONAL SHOES 

STANDARD UNDERCARRIAGE 



i Shoe width mm (in) 


500 (23.6) tnole grouser 


300 (31.5) tnole grouser 


SCO (35.4) tnole grouser 


! Machine ground pressure ' 
•eg/cm 2 (psi) 


i 

0.44 (6.37) | 


0.34 (4.90) 


I 
0.31 (4.41) 


; Additional weight '<g (lb) 


-510 (1130) 


280 (617) 


-255 (560) 


i Shoe application ccce 


x 


Z 


z i 


LC UNDERCARRIAGE 


j Shoe width mm fin) 


500 (23.6) tnole grouser 


3C0 (31.5) triple grouser 


900 (35.4) tnoie grouser 


j Machine ground pressure 
kg/cm 2 (psi) 


0.^1 (5.91) 


0.32 (4.55) 


0.29 (4.11) 


■ Additional weignt kg (lb) 


-275 (610) 


-^275 (510) 


-550 (1.230) 


Shoe apoiicanon code 


X 


Z 


Z 



X-Pcc!cy terrain, river aanks 4 ^ereral terrain 
Y-Generai cr soft terrain 
Z-Extremely sort terrain (swames) 



a = 53 321 -02 7,90 



Materials and soeofications are suoiect to cnange «itnout nolics. 



tHKOMATSU 

KQMATSU MARKETING DIVISION 



UPP 




.(716)377-1992 
_(7 16) 254-2125 
.(315)463-6673 
.(518) 735-iSCO 

Watartown (315) 733-5512 

EnCicott (6071 743-3400 



Birffato 

Rochester 
Syracusa. 

Ai cany 



=-:nteo in 'JSA 



Komatsu and • !• are :racemar*s ol Komatsu Ltd.. Jaoan 






[' 



KOMAT 

XCMATSU MAflK 



V * 




~ij r*c!uca sc/cnai scutccent. 



) 



KOMATSU: The Quality is Standard. 

FLYWHEEL HORSEPOWER: 70 HP (52 kW) § 2350 RPM. OPERATING WT: 6520 kg (14,360 lb) 

• Long tracks prcvce these valuacle extras: flotation, traction, stability and efficient grading. 
• Komatsu-buiit server train maximizes crccucticn while assuring excellent fuel economy. 
• Designed fzr maximum curaciiity. *e acuity and ma.ntainaciity. 
• Wet-type steermc anc cares exter-: tturaciiity, ".cease :ceratcr :cntroi. 
• HYDRC5H1F7 transm ss;c" c*c\ :es eff.ciencv c direct z."ve anc :onvenience of cowersnift. 



white assuring excdfent fiieE economy* 



HYDROSHIFT transmission 

The 031 E is equipped with 
Komatsu's unique HYDRO- 
SHIFT transmission, assuring • 
smooth gear shifts, powerful 
traction and low fuel consump- 
tion. It consists of a damper 
and planetary gear packs. The 
HYDROSHIFT transmission 
makes two previously incompat- 
ible factors compatible: It effi- 
ciently converts engine power 
to traction with minimal power 
loss as obtained with a direct- 
drive transmission, and it offers 
smooth, easy shifting as ob- 
tained with the powershift trans- 



mission equipped with a torque 
converter. Unlike ordinary 
powershift transmissions with 
torque converters, traction does 
not decrease, even when the 
engine is running at partial 
throttle. 




Fuel-efficient 6D95L engine 
The Kcmatsu 6D95L-1 features 
a direct-injection. Microturbu- 
lence Combustion Chamber 
(MTCC) fuel system. Intake air 
is swirled into the combustion 
chamber where it is mixed with 
injected, atomized fuel, provid- 
ing optimum combustion. This 
MTCC fuel system not only con- 
tributes to greater pcwer and 
fuel savings, but also insures 
reduced noise and c:eaner ex- 
haust. Cushion mounted engine 
reduces noise and vibration 
even further. 

An electrical heater located in 
the intake-air manifcld warms 
fresh air to assure smooth, 
quick engine starts, even in 
cold weather. 



• 






I 






SPECIFICATIONS 



^ 




Komatsu 6095L-1, 4-cycle, water-cooled diesei engine with 6 
cylinders of 95 mm (3.7*) bore x 1 15 mm (4.5") stroke and 
4.87 Itr. (298 in 1 ) piston displacement. 
Flywheel horsepower: 

70 HP (52 kW) at 2350 RPM (SAE J 1349) 

Maximum torque '. 26.6 kg-m (1 92 ft-lb) 

at 1400 RPM 
Direct-injection Microturbulence Combustion Chamber sys- 
tem for fuel economy. Mechanical all-speed governor. Gear- 
pump-driven force-lubrication with full-flow filter. Dry-type air 
cleaner with automatic dust evacuator for longer element ser- 
vice and dust indicator for simplified maintenance. All the 
filters are spin-on type for easy element replacement. Electri- 
cal 24-volt starting system. 




Wet-type damper, with builr=in-torsion and friction springs, 
aoscrbs engine torque vibrations as well as stress from exter- 
nal inoacts. 



<£& CH*YDR0SHrFTSrSNSMTssf0N jjp§& 

The unique Komatsu HYDROSHIFT transmission with plane- 
tar/ gears is hydraulically-controlled and force-lubricated. Effi- 
cient cower flow and simplified direction and speed changes 
(3 forward and 3 reverse) are achieved with one lever. 



Travel speeds 


Fctward 


Rated drawoar pull 


Reverse 


1st 


2.2 km/h 


73-40 kg 


2.4km/h 




(1.4 MPH) 


(16,200 lb) 


(1.5 MPH) 


2nd 


3.3 km/h 


3950 kg 


4.3 km/h 




(2.4 MPH) 


(8.710 lb) 


(2.7 MPH) 


3rd 


5.5 km/h 


2170 kg 


7.1 km/h 




(4.0 MPH) 


(4,800 lb) 


(4.4 MPH) 


Max. drawbar 


DUll 


9010 ka 


(19.860 1b 



M 



STEERING 






J 



Wet, multiple-disc, hand-operated steering clutches are hy- 
draulically boosted and interconnected with wet. contracting- 
band. steering brakes to allow easy, lignt-touch steering/ 
braking actions. A modulating valve built into the steering 
circuit facilitates smooth, shockless steering control. Inching 
pedal assures smooth, easy starting and stopoing, precise 
inching approaches to cotstacles and impact digging. 



FINAL DRIVE 




Scur gear, douole-raduction final drives. Segmented 
sprockets are installed on the hub with bolts for easy in-field 
reoiacemer.t. 




E^J --.undercarriage 

Suspension Rigid type 

Track roller frame Box-section, high-tensile-strength 

steel construction. 

Rollers and idlers Lubricated idlers, track and carrier 

rollers are sealed with floating seals. 

Number of track rollers 5 each 

Number of carrier rollers 1 each 

Track shoes Assembled single-grouser shoes. 

Unique dust seals prevent entry of dust into pin-to-bushing 
clearances for extended service. Track tension is easily ad- 
justed with a grease gun. 

Number of shoes 37 each side 

Grouser height 47 mm (1 .9") 

Ground clearance 315 mm (12.4") 

Shoe width (standard) 330 mm (13.0") 

Ground contact area 1 241 cm 2 (1 ,923 in 1 ) 

Ground pressure (less blade) 0.44 kg/cm 1 (6.29 PSI) 




rcOOL^N^KirUBRICANT^GA^CITiyi 



^(refilling): 



Coolant 22 Itr. ( 5.3 U.S. gal) 

Fuel tank 115 Itr. (30.4 U.S. gal) 

Engine 9 Itr. ( 3.4 U.S. gal) 

Damper case 0.7 Itr. ( 0.2 U.S. gal) 



Transmission 13 

Bevel gear case 17 

Steering case •. . 30 

Final drive (each side) 9.5 

Hydraulic tank 33 



Itr. ( 3.4 U.S. gal) 

Itr. ( 4.5 U.S. gal) 

Itr. ( 7.9 U.S. 'gal) 

Itr. ( 2.5 U.S. gal) 

Itr. ( 8.7 U.S. gal) 



J .OPERATINGWEiGHT£(appfo'xim"ate)2j 



Operating weight, including power-angle-tiltdozer, ROPS, op- 
erator, standard equipment, rated capacity of lubricant, cool- 
ant and full fuel tank! 5520 kg (14,360 lb) 

Ground pressure 0.53 kg/cm 2 (7.5 PSI) 

$2 HYDRAULlOSYSTEM^^^^^^i 




iHYDRAUUCSYSTEM^^^^^p:! 

Hydraulic control unit: Gear-type hydraulic pump mountec 
on rear of engine with capacity (discharge flow) of 90 Itr. (23.3 
U.S. gal)/min. at rated engine RPM. 

Relief valve setting 175 kg/cm 2 (2,490 PSI) 

Control valves 

• Three control valves for power-angle-tiltdozer 

Positions: Blade lift Raise, hold. lower and flea 

Blade angle Left, hold and righ 

Blade tilt Left, hold and rign 

• Two control valves for trimming dozer 

Positions: Blade lift Raise, held, lower and flea: 

Trimming Forward, hold and backwarc 

• Additional control valve required for ripper 

Positions: Ripper lift Raise, hold, lower and flea- 
Hydraulic cylinders: Ooufcle-acting. piston type 



Cylinder i Numoer of cylinders 

Blade lift 2 

3iade tilt 1 



Sere 



90 mm (3.54") 
90 mm (3.54") 



Blade angling 



90 mm (3.54") 



p 



DIMENSIONS :=qu:pped with power angia-tiltcozer and ROPS cancpv) 

12S0(4'1 -) 



- r 







i%| Un 



- • --"Ok ■>—--> 






t: mm (ft.in) 

~ i »i t i» * i ■■ 




• P e X a >° C^ilsntedl arran g e men t io fi| " 

^control J^e^^^als'rttnstr^ments'U 
—ar^o^eraTqT's'seat^^^^^^^^^ 

t raulicaljy boosted steering f^-^M 

• ^Walk-throughi^erltoV's^cmp'a'rt'-^ 



SWISS 



• Suspended JLtype^ped'ais^eHminate"^ 
% g a p s 'in \ t h e J I oot; -re d u c i rig n c I s e?||£ ' 

• .Colorjcoded '?m£ters'*;jijTd?gaugesT 
^wTth"\'niversal symjaols^^^'.^^^^ 

• Dust indicator installed on the !nstrij~ 
^•nJpajrreL^m^gg^. ... 

• Padded?\fcre/art adjustable .'"opera 5 * 

• Oil-Vu^perTsionTsIatTisTcdtich^iTy^ 



Tav'ailable.H^il 

."" -••■'ri-v.i*3Ss'5SKSt! 



.'^?*l'o"U 



-2"-^!.. 









TANDARD EQUIPMENT 

HYDRCSHirT transmission • 230 mm (13.0') single- 
cuser shoes • Hydraulic trac.< aciusters • 2- V, 25 A aiterna- 
r • 2- V, 3.5 kW electric starting motor • Front ana rear :rac< 
iter guards • Wet-type, interconnected steering ciutches and 
"akes • In-line radiator core • Ory-tyce air cleaner with autc- 
atic dust evacuator and dust inc'cator • 24 V (12 V x 2). 1 50 



An batteries • 5-rci'er track : ra,mes • _ '.". rq system (2 front 
and 1 rear light) • Blower fan • Mufr'.e" • ^Cjustaole operator's 
seat • Seat beit • Crankcaseguarc • = C~S cracke's • Backup 

aiarm • Console type lever steering • Zeceierator pedal • 
Inching cecal • P.aciatcr guard • Unce-guara • ?70 gear box 

• Gauce crouo 



Ol DOZER EQUIPMENT 


. ".- ;.■'•- 






•■-■* "*.■? 'i 
..... 




ectec : rcm carnage. 








Overall 


j Mai. ..rt i Mk. crcc 
"3iaae j =iac:e ascve ;9 : ow j 


1 : 


AcC!i:cra. 


*-i gnt 


Actional 
. g.-auna 
pressure 


J lergtri 
| *it.1 Cazsr 


Max. ::;[ i riaca : 
3C:us;.men( | angle : 


Eiace 


— •aramic 


'ower-ar.gie- 1 37S5 mm 1 1.25 mi ; Z4l5mm < JiQ .-rim i 355 —m i 37Q mm 
trco;er i (12") I (1.63yd*) (3 <23') ' (t'O - ) (V3') 


35C mm 1 -- , 


350 <; 
t,370 IS) 


iaoo lb) 


" 



ice :acac;r; s casea ;n :ne jA; 



; - ac- :^ , • ,5; 






D 



\ 



Designed for maximum durability, reliability and 
maintainability. 



Every Komatsu crawler is man- 
ufactured with Kcmatsu-built 
components. Since each com- 
ponent is produced under the 
world's strictest quality control, 
reliability and durability are as- 
sured. Maintainability is also a 
factor contributing to machine 
efficiency and economy, and 
the D31 E offers vou more. 







Bolt-on type sprocket: The 

bolt on sprockets can be easily 
replaced on the job-site when 
needed, for reduced down- 








Lubricated track links 
(optional): Since the clear- 
ance between the link pin and 
bushing is lubricated, wear 
and pitch elongation are 
minimized for extended ser- 
vice life. With lubricated track, 
power loss cue to friction of 
pin and bushing is reduced, 
increasing operating comfort 
and performance. Soiit master 
links are also provided to 
facilitate track assembly and 
disassembly. 




Wet type steering clutches 
and brakes: The D31E has in- 
terconnected, lever-operated, 
wet steering clutches and 
brakes for long sen/ice life and 
reliability. The self-adjusting 
steering clutches are multiple- 
cisc type with a hydraulic 
bGoster insuring light-touch 
lever movements, while the 
brakes are the contracting- 
band type that facilitate easy 
lining replacement. 



A Wide Range of Attachments and Optional Equipment 



ROPS cab* 



ROPS Canopy* 



Trimming dozer 



Multishank ripper 




^: -.1 








«3 













Towing winch !^*^r**^SS*j|«i^ 










Swing drawbar 5"" v -i£. i V^fe; 

••*£££— ■* <-L » Jattj." r \r^--r^-'-. 






v3-point hitch. ^ ? ^=^^a 




•ROPS cab and ROPS car.opy meet ISO~3471, SAE Jl040aand SAE J395a ROPS standards. 



Other attachments and optional equipment 



• Reversible fan 

• Final drive case wear guarcs 

• Track-roller guards, center 

• Front pull hcok 
Hitch type drawbar 

/ 30l kit 
Pedal steering 

• Underguards (heavy duty) 

• Rear screens 

• Side screens 

• Heater and defroster 

• Radiator core protective gric 



• Hinged radiator grill 

• Vandalism protection kit 

• Oil-suspension seat 

• Fairlead for winch 

• <ith valve and lever for ripper 
control 

• Front sweeps 

• Tank guards 

• Sealed and lubricated track 

• Perforated engine side covers 



Optional shoes 





ACdilionai 
xeKjnt 
kg (lb) 


Ground 

comae: arsa 

crrU(lnJ) 


Additional 

ground 
pressure 

(tractor) 

<cycmi I 
(PSD 


j *C0 Tim 

(15. J") 

jingie-grouser 
1 snce 


-30 
(^175) 


:S04O 
(2.331) 


-3.37 
(1.30) 


1 JCO mm 
1 0S.3-) 

tnoM grouser 
1 sro* 


-90 
(-200) 


| 1 50-»0 
1 (2.331) 


-O.09 
| (0.1) 



This soecification sneet may contain attachments and ooticnal eouioment that are not availaole in your area. Please consult your iccal Kcmatsu 
cistnbutor for those :tems you may require. Materials and scecfications are suoiec: :o change without notice. 



i 



•HKOMATSU 

XOMATSU MARKETING DIVISION 



UPP 




Buffalo 

Pocresrer_ 

Syracuse 

Albany. ,. 
Wa;eftown_ 
E™:icctt 



— (716)377-1992 
—(716)254-2125 
-•(315) J63-3673 
-..(513) 735-tSOO 
.-.(315)738-5512 
—(607) 743-34C0 



Form , No AE5S298-03 '.3-3' 



Printed in U.S.A. 





:ce! sncwn may include optional equipment. 



KOMATSU: The Quality is Standard. 

FLYWHEEL HORSEPOWER: 264 HP j 2150 RPM. OPERATING WEIGHT: 21700 kg (47,840 1b). 
BUCKET CAPACITY: 3.5-4.2 m : (4.6-5.5 yd : ) 
• Lares dumcirc : e srar :e i~ : 'e ~:~ ::.: ec .•• tr rcee": v : s.: :\ ertnarces ce r :crmance. 



• Long whes rise. -0 : a" : - ?. 
maneuvers: . ;y. 
• Powerful, '-ri effic en: 1/ 

• Wet cisc :'E<es 2~: sea 

• E'ec:*:~ : z sc i. ~ :- 






/ice excellent stability and 
5 :':-. ce ~ " perfor-rancs ana extended 

'.' contrcis ensure light 






Efficient, Comfortable Operating Equipment 





Spacious, comfortable operator's compartment 

— is rear-mounted to reduce operator swing and 
fatigue. The optional cab provides excellent visibil- 
ity with a large area of tinted glass and is rubber- 
pad mounted to minimize noise and vibration. All 
pedais. control levers and instruments are arranged 
for maximum operating efficiency. 

Minimum Maintenance 
Means Less Downtime 



Electrically controlled transmission, proportional pressure 
equipment control valve — Komatsu's electrically controlled 
transmission allows the operator to quickly and easily shift gears. The 
adjustable length shift lever sends an electronic signal to a solenoid 
on the hydraulic control valve, so the gear change is smooth and 
easy. The unique kick-down switch, located on top of the boom lever, 
improves loading efficiency. Pressing the switch while traveling 
forward in 2nd gear smoothly shirts the 
speed down to 1st gear improving loading 
efficiency. Pilot operated control 
through a Proportional Pressure 
Control (PPC) valve decreases 
operating effort. 




Wet disc brakes — are adjustment free and completely 
enclosed in the axle housing, sealing them off from dirt 
and other potential contaminants. Two brake pedals are 
provided for normal braking. In addition, the left pedal 
can be used to simultaneously brake and neutralize the 
transmission by simply actuating a switch. 




Sealed loader linkage pins with additional cord rings 

— keep the grease in and contaminants out, providing 
extended grease intervals. Also, the greasing points are 
conveniently located so that-they are within easy reach. 




The Electronic display panel — is a display/warning system whicf" 
continuously monitors all operating systems. If a malfunction shoulc 
occur the operator is immediately warned which system is experie" 
trouble, saving time lost searching for the problem. Also, gauges 
constantly monitor air pressure, coolant temperature, transmission 
temperature, fuel level, service hours and speed. Komatsu's 
transmission safety system insures that the engine cannot be start; 
unless the transmission is in neutral. 



SPECIFICATIONS 




The Cummins LTA i CC is a 4-stroke. water-cooled, aftercooled. 
direct-iniection turcccharged diesel engine with 6 cylinders 
and a 125 mm (4.9 ") bore x 136 mm (5.4") stroke for a 10 Itr. 
(511 in J ) piston cisciacement. 
Flywheel horsepower: 

264HP(197fcV0 at 2150 RPM (SAEJ1349) 
Direct-injection fuel system. All-speed mechanical governor. 
Gear-pump-driven fcrce-lubrication with full-flow filters. All fil- 
ters are spin-on type for easy maintenance. Dry-type air 
cleaner with automatic dust evacuator, and dust indicator. 24 
V/7.5 kW direct electric starting motors. 24 V/45 A alternator. 2 
x 12 V/170 Ah batteries. 



BOOM & BUCKET 



Z-bar loader linkage is made of high-tensile-strength steel to 
provide maximum rigidity, fast cycle times and superior 
breakout force. Rap-out loader linkage design enables shock 
dumping to remove sticky materials. Sealed leader linkage 
pins fitted with dust seals and cord rings and sealed, oil lubri- 
cated bucket hinge pins extend maintenance intervals. The 
bucket is also constructed of high-:ensile-s:rength steel. 
3ucket corner teeth increase penetrating force and minimize 
bucket wear. 
Boom and Bucket Cycle Times 

Raise 6.6 sec. 

Lower 3.5 sec. 

Dump 1.6 sec. 

Total 1 1 .7 sec. 



TRANSMISSION 



3-element, single-stage, single-phase torque converter. Full 
powershift. planetary-gear transmission. A modulating func- 
tion assures shoeless speed and directional changes without 
braking. An electrically controlled transmission allows finger- 
tip control with speed and directional change levers. A neutral 
safety circuit allows starting only when the directional control 
lever is in neutral. A kick-down-switch shifts transmission from 
forward 2nd to is: cear. 

Travel 

soeed Forward Reverse 

1st 0- 6.3 <~i/h ( 3.9 MPH) 0- 7.1 km/'h ( 4.4 MPH) 

2nd 0-11.3 <-/h( 7.0 MPH) 0-12.5 km/h ( 7.8 MPH) 

3rd 0-19.1 .<m/h (11.9 MPH) 0-21.2 km/h (13.2 MPH) 

4th 0-31.9 <m/h (19.8 MPH) 0-35.1 km/h (21.8 MPH) 



AXLE AND RNAL DRIVE 



Four-wheel drive system. A full-floating front axle is fixed to the 
front frame. Cer.:e'-oin-supported. full-floating rear axle with a 
large oscillation c : - 15°. A spiral bevel gear for reduction, a 
straight bevel gea.' ; cr differential and a planetary gear for final 
reduction. 



^3 BRAKES 



£s 



Service brakes: Air-over-hydraulic, wet, multiple-disc brakes 
actuate all four w-eeis. Two brake pedals provided. The right 
\^.^, for normal braking: the left offers normal braking or neutralizes 
the transmission .vnen the transmission cut-off switch is ac- 
tivated. 

Parking brake: Z"/ disc type, soring applied, air released on 
the front axle pir.cn snaft. 

Emergency bra<e: The parking brake is automatically ac- 
tuated as an eme'eency brake wr.en air pressure drops below 
the rated value. 



TIRES 



I 



y 



Front and rear: 25.5-25-20PR (L-3) 
Rims: 22.00 x 25 WT3 



STEERING SYSTEM: 



Center-pivot frame articulation. Mechanical fcllow-up type, 
full-hydraulic pewer assisted steering mcecendent of engine 
RPMs. A wide articulation angie of -0 3 on eacn side for a 
minimum turning radius of 5320 mm (19'1 ") at the outside of 

tire. 



BUCKET CONTROLS 



Proportional Pressure Control assures light-touch work- 
equipment control. Therefore, little effort is required to operate 
the bucket and boom control levers, assuring smooth, respon- 
sive bucket/boom action. In addition, the bucket positioner and 
the boom kickout device facilitate repeated digging/loading 
operations. 
Control positions: 

Boom Raise, hold, Icwer and float 

Bucket Tilt-back, hold and dump 



^ HYDRAULIC SYSTEM 



One variable capacity piston pump for loader control, three 
fixed displacement piston pumos for sv/itcn anc steering con- 
trol and one gear pump for pilot control. 
Capacity (discnarge flow) at engine 2CG0 RPM: 

Loader pumo 2-2 itr. (53.9 U.S. gal/min) 

Pilot pump. '. ^2 Itr. (10.9 U.S. gal/min) 

Switch pump 1C6 itr. (23.0 U.S. gal/min) 

Steering pump 225 Itr. (53.7 U.S. gal/min) 

Relief valve setting 210 kg/cm 1 (3000 psi) 

Control valves: A icubie-sccol tyce control vaive and a 
steering valve with a demand valve. 

HyCraulic No. of 

cylinders cylinders 3ore Stroke 

3com 2 130 mm (7.1 ") 75C rr.rn (29.9") 

Bucket 1 2C0m,m(7.9") 550 -~, (21.7") 

Steering 2 100 mm (3.9") -i-iC mm (17.3") 



/\| SERVICE REFILL CAPACITIES 



Cooling system 55 Itr. ( 1 4.0 U.S. gal) 

Fuel tank 332 itr. (101.2 U.S. gal) 

Engine oil 32 Itr. ( 3.5 U.S. gal) 

Hydraulic system 1-8 Itr. ( 39.1 U.S. gal) 

Differential, final drive case 55 Itr. ( 17.2 U.S. gal) 

(each axle) 
Torque converter and 

transmission 59 Itr. ( 15.6 U.S. gal) 



**fe OPERATING WEIGHT 



Operating weignt. inducing rated cacacity of lubricant, cool- 
ant, full fuel tank. 25.5-25-20PR (L-3) tires. - 2 m 1 (5.5 yd u 
SA5 heaoed capacity loose material cuc<e:. FOPS cancoy 
cao. ooerator anc other standard equicment: 2l700kc 
(47,340 lb). 




Jlmensions 



~'9 sua and coda 


23.5-25 


26.5-25 


Tread 


2300 mm 
(7-7-) 


2300 mm 
(7T) 


Width over tires 


2900 mm 
(9-S-) 


2990 mm 
' (9'10-) 


Change in vertical 
dimension 


—30 mm (3*) 





Change in reach 


♦ 30 mm (3") 





Change in digging depin 
0* 

10* 


♦ 30 mm (3") 

♦ 30 mm (3*) 






Change in overall length 
Sucket on ground 
Bucket at carry 


♦ 30 mm (3*) 

♦ 30 mm (3*) 








2 T 

I ml • 




^ 



*\ 



./ 



r? 



Oumomq .-•aen \ \ 




r* 



3uc«t type 




1 


Lcose matenal 




Sxcavaong 




| 


9cit^3n cutting edge 


3ait-on ;eetn 


3cit-on curcrg edge 


3oace nose 1 


3uc*et caoaaty 


3A£ rated 


1 


- 4.2 mJ (5.5 yW 


3.3 mJ (4.5 yd') 


3.3 mJ (5.0 yd') 


3.5 mi (4.5 ydl 


StAICk 


I 


3.5 ,T)J (4.7 yd') 


3.0 rfU (3.3 yd3) 


3 3 1*0 (4.3 f&) 


3.0 mJ (3.3 ydJ) 



3uc:<et *ictn I 


3170 mm (10'5*) 


3190 mm fJQ'5*] 


317Q mm (10*5") 


3170 mm (10*5*) 


5uc.<e: .veigru 


2080 kg (4.590 lb) 


2C60 kg (4.540 lb) 


21-40 <g (4.720 1b) 


1380 <g (4.365 ib) 


S;a:c nccir.g dad Stfaieni 


TS320 <g (37.090 16) 


l7CC0kg (37.430 lb) 


15390 kg (37.240 lb) 


17160 kq (37.330 lb) 




14560 '<g (32.320 1!)) 


14830 kg (32.590 'bi 


1-1720 <g (32.450 lb) 


liSBOkg (33.320 lb) 


• -msing clearance, max. .".eigne 
;ira -5' Cumo angle 


3030 mm (9'11") 


2S60 mm (9'9") 


3C8Smm (10'1") 


2CC5 mm (910*) 


J Sescn at 2130 mm (7') cut jcge clearance 
Mid -»5' Cumo angle 


1775 mm (5'9") 


1735 mm (5'10*) 


1745 mm (5'9") 


! 

1735 mm (5'3") 



V^ 



3ea« a; max. neignt and 45* cumo ing:i 



1190 mm (3'11*) 



1245 mm (4'1") 



1145 mm (3'9") 



1255 mm (4*2*) 



Pjac.i *itn arm nonzcntai and :ucxe: »•/•! 



25C0 mm (37') 



2635 mm |S'1Q") 



2530 mm (8'4') 



2570 mm (8'9*) 



Ccirannq -teiqnt (fuily -aisec) 



5305 mm (19'1*) 



57C0 mm (18*8") 



57G0mm (18'S") 



5575 mm (137") 



I Cvera.l 'engtn 



5uc<j'. :n ;round 



390 mm (27*6*) 



3480 mm (27*10") 



3320 mm I27'4") 



3220 mm (27'Q") 



3uc<3! it :ar-y 



3340 mm (27'4") 



3410 mm (277') 



3290 mm (27*2*1 



32C0 mm (28*10") 



Turning -3Cius (bucket at carry. 
:u:s;Ce comer of bucxet) 


: 

5820 mm (22"5") 


i 
5860 mm (22'5*) 


53C0 mm (22'4*) 


i 
5735 mm (227') 


Cigging jeow 0* 


75 mm (3*) 1 


35 mm (3.7') 


75 mm (3') 


45 mm (1.9*) 


10* 


315 mm (10") 


345 mm (17") 


300 mm (11.3*) 


235 mm (11.5*) 


3r»a«ut lorce (bucxet cyiincer) 


18350 kg (40,460 lb) 


21020 kg (45.340 lb) 


19410 kg (42.790 lb) 


17370 kg (38.2951b) 


Ccerating *eigm 


2i7C0kg (47.340 16) 


21630 kg (47.795 lb) 


21760 kg (47.970 1b) 


21 SCO kg (47.520 Ib) 



Ail dimensions. «eignts ano cenormanc* /aiues based on SA£ j-732c and J-7425 standards. 

< Static iioomg dad ano coeratwg *e:qnt snown include lubncants. coolant, lull fuel tanx. steal cao. SOPS canooy (CBBcn), ooeratcr and 25 5-25.20 PR (L-31 
'cose matenal bucket. Mac.'me staciiity arc cceraanq »*<;ru are arfected by counterfeit, nre size and otner attachments, use wner tire ballast or count* 
**:gnt cnanges io coeratwg .*e:gnt ana statx noomg dad. 



ruceiess nres. SA£ neaced caoacty 
rweignt. not com. Aoa ;r*e 'oiicwing 



Weight changes 








Tires and ootions 


1 r. i 


Change in noomg 


dad 


Change in ooerating *eignt . 


Straiqnt 


r-jil :urn 


Accition3i countersign! 


♦ 325 kg (+715161 


♦ 31 5 kg ( + 1.795 lb) 


-5-J0kg ( + 1.410 16) 


1 a C?S canoov iremovedi 


-475 kg (-1.050161 


-5i5<g (-1.050 lb) 


-485 kg (-1.07015) 


Steei cao iremoved) 


-235 kg (-53016) 


-255kq (-36016) 


-245 kq (-54015) 


| 23 5-25-20 PR (L-2) 


-730 kg (-1.720 16) ! 


-530<q (-1.300 16) 


- 5 1 5 <q (-1.135 16) 


| 23 5-25-20 PR (L-21* 


-270 kg (595 16) 


- 1 CC0 kg (2.20516) 


-330 kg (1.94015) 


1 23 5-25-20 PR (L-31 


-470 kg (-1035 16) I 


-350. kq (-77016) 


-315 <q (-595 I6) ! 


23 5-25-20 PR il-3r 


-530 kg (1.23016) 


- 1240 kq (2.735 16) 


- 1090 kq (2.400 16) 


As 5-25-20 PR (L-31 * * 


- 1230 kg (3.04516) 


-2CS0kq (4.510 161 


- 1340 kq (4,060 15) 


i 25 5-25-20 PR ll-4) 


-2*0 kg (465 lb) 


-i60<g (350 16) 


- 135 <q (300 lb) 


: 25 5-25-20 :, R( 1-41* * 


- ;590<q (3.50516) 


-2250 <q (4.96016) 


- 1930 kg (4.36515) 


1 25 5-25-20 PR! 1-3) 


-750<g (1.57515) 


-:30<q (1.23016) 


-505 <q (1.11516) . 


! 25 5-25-20 PR IL-Si" 


- 2140 kq (4.720 ib) 


-25o0kq (5.36516) 


-2330 kq (5.13016)- 



1050 
•230 



<q (2.315 16) rtv .vnejl oa.last 
<q (3.040 16) rear «nesi oanast 



ice. 



J 



) 




Superior Productivity Through., 



...Powerful work equipment 



Tillable steering column and 
adjustable oil suspension 
seat — The tiltable steering col- 
umn can be adjusted through a 
4-inch range. Combined with 
the fully-adjustable oil suspen- 
sion sea: it allows the operator 
to obtain maximum comfort and 
efficiency during operation. 



Outstanding bucket and loader 
performance — Z-bar loader 
linkage provides a high breakout 
force, fast cycle times and ex- 
tended dumping reaches for maxi- 
mum productivity. The bucket po- 
sitioner and the boom kickout 
device simplify repeated digging/ 
loading operations for increased 
productivity. 




High Component Reliability — 

All components are designed and 
manufactured to Komatsu's high 
standards for maximum quality 
and reliability. 




...Fuel efficient engine 

The Cummins LTA10C diesel en- 
gine — provides a ■ 61 1 in J piston 
displacement for a powerful 264 
HP. This 6 cylinder turcccharged 
and aftercooled engine is also fuel 
efficient, minimizing fuel con- 
sumption per hour of production. 



...Versatile stable operation 



3 



Stable operation over any 
terrain — A center-pin supported 
-ear =x;e w:tn a 30° axle oscilla- 
tion angle, extra 'cng wneelbase. 
'.vice :-eac anc -0° articulation an- 
gle maintain ccerating productivity 
anc crevice stability even aver the 
rcucres; of surfaces. 



Reduction in operating effort of 
steering — The use of fully hy- 
draulic steering ensures quick re- 
sponse and the ability to maintain 
travel in a straight line, while re- 
ducing operating effort, so opera- 
tor fatigue is reduced. 




STANDARD EQUIPMENT 



• Air compressor 

• Alternator 45A 

• 8ack-up alarm 

- Batteries 2 x 12V/170 Ah 
> Brakes (wet disc) 

• 8ucket positioner (automatic) 

• Cooling fan, blower 

• Differentials, torque 
proportioning 

• Electronic Display/Monitoring 
System, includes: Gauges; fuel 
level, transmission temperature, 
coolant temperature and air 
pressure, Level Check Displays; 
radiator coolant, engine oil and 
brake oil, Caution Items; battery 

OPTIONS 



charge, fuel level, brake and oil 
pressure, engine oil pressure, 
coolant level, air pressure, 
coolant temperature, torque 
converter temperature, and 
transmission oil filter. 
Engine key stop 
Fenders (front and rear half) 
Four-wheel drive system 
Hitch 

Ladders (right and left) 
Lift kickout (automatic) 
Lighting system: 2 front and 
2 rear working lights, stop lights, 
tail lights, turn signals and 
back-up light 



• Power steering (full-hydraulic) 

• Rear view mirrors 
ROPS brackets 
Seat (oil suspension) 
Seat belt 

Starting motors 24V, 7.5 kW 
direct electric 

• Tiltable steering wheel 

• Transmission (electronic control 
4 forward and 4 reverse) 

• Vandalism protector 



• Air conditioner with heater and 
defroster 

• Air dryer 

• Cab (enclosed), includes: floor- 
mat, inside mounted mirror, two 
caD mounted working lights, 
front and rear windshield 
washer and wipers, LH & RH 
front hand rails and outside 
mounted rear view mirrors 

WORK EQUIPMENT 

• 4.2 m J (5.5 yd 5 ) loose material 
straight edge bucket 

• 3.3 m 3 (5.0 yd 3 ) excavating 
straight edge bucket 

• 3.5 m 3 (4.6 yd 3 ) excavating 
straight edge bucket 

• 3.5 m 3 (4.6 yd 3 ) excavating 
spade nose 

• Bucket teeth (bolt on) 

• Cutting edge (boit on) 



• Countweight, additional 325 kg 
(715 1b) 

• Counterweight, logging 2150 kg 
(4,730 lb) 

• Emergency steering 

• Heater and defroster 



• Hydraulic adapter kit, includes 3 
spool valve, lever and piping. 

• Rims for 23.5-25 tires (4) 

• Rims for 25.5-25 tires (4) 

• ROPS (open) 



A = 3SC-"-CQ 



.•HKOMATSU 

XCMAT5U MARKETING DIVISION 



map 



Materials »n" <n~"*-—-- 
- *„.„ (716) 377-1992 

3 u ^ l0 ""V 1716)254-2123 

Rochester pio) — 

ETrSKESS 

SSSzSSSBS 



•9 suoiect to cnange witrtoul notice. 



P'imea n USA 3/90 



Kamatsu ana 



!■*■ tracemarys Of Komatsu Ltd.. Jaoan. 



H-A'l V-- 



'-■«*. "V - ~ - V *- »V *-"-. '.7c . r-'« 'J^* ' V U' 



^i -^>V;; ! ^^?;>-,r -• ;-•. j- ~ £ .^^,. ^ 'f .j?.',-i. -•-••/. ..^-.\ v^-^ -• -■ f- 







JCB 1400B 

2- OR 4-WHEEL DRIVE BACKHOE LOADERS 



• 70 and 30 ."c: hp. cr.^ir.cs • Ccncerrr.cur.c or : 
• 6.500 lbs. loader life caoaciiv • 2- or 4-wheci dri- 







_ •>> / ' ^ ^'--*?* v r'^-;-ir x -z.- -.... 



■■■'■- i>.*^i^*^<~-"-^-. „-- ■ 



> -:^t^ 






JCB 1400B - VERSATILE, HARD WORKING PERFORMANCE. 



VERSATILE LOADER. 



:i :wzr. 



;ac:f. -"" automatic up-ar.c-uown mechanic: 
mi. mi re ;;.f.a;reand simplify lifting v*::h for<v 



HARD WORKING BACKHOE. 

•ic.-ess-'eiie'.ec: ".cor - ■« nich breakout and excellent 
duv*n-;rench ■.$;-•..■.;■■ _ ::ionul Extract extending dipper, with 

adjustable '.vear pacs. _:rs standard double pumo oceration to 
;a; invaluable r v .;ra r-z:.-. -.vith independent telescopic action for 
fast e-.czva::.-.* times. 

EFFICIENT HYDRAULICS. 



JC3 e\zi'-:s: - .e double : . 
valve to provide optima: 
work rates uozr.o fuel :: 



— p system uith pressure sensitive oif'.oader 
". "ow to match system pressure and keep 
■i.i motion down under ail conditions. 



POWERFUL ENGINES. 

In 70 ho. 5AE 52ki''. •'.: naturailv asDirated form, for IW'D 



machines, and 3l)hu SAL .".'•.■'• net '...'"■ ii:::.:r;-: " - '■ ." 
meet .uljun requirements. 

HIGH PERFORMANCE POWERTRAIN 

JC3 \laA-Trac a.\ics vviih outboarc: pianeturv rcduc::. 
'. c-N.n^ :o";ue proportioninvC cillcrentiais and ni-ir.rr .■:•.- 
nrxjard aisc nrakes. Tile Synchro -Shuttle :ran>t:;ivi:i;:; :.:::'. 
an mtccrai tcrrtue con - . erter and fu!l\ -v. ncr.roiu'/.vc - — :■ .- 
£earbu\ -.x i t h an electric O'.er h-.drauiic reversing >hu::.e " . 
and smooth directional chances. 

COMFORTABLE OPERATOR AREA. 

Erqonomic control layout. 3ostrom suspension seat, res:..-" : 
mountings, and i'27cu.ft. ij.'icu. rt.i of interior space ~a- :m:. 
producti'.ity and minimize fatirae. Optional cab hzj Z-... .".: 
opening windows, tinted ?iass. sapcrb visibility anc or.e .: •.-. 
'.Quest noise le'-eis available. 




A HARD WORKING 



BACKHOE. 



Available wich either centermount or sideshift rear 
frame, both buiic as integ'tii parts of the mainframe for 
exceptional strength ar.c rigidity, theJC3 backhoe unit is 
the result of extensive research, computer assisted design, 
meticulous engineering ir.d extensive rig testing, in both the 
fo \ lab, a.- .d the held. 
a \\ " All enabling it to strike the 

perfect balance between 
siimness, speed, strength and 
longevity. All combining to give 
it unrivalled performance 
capabilities. 

With the standard 
centermount backhoe, the twin 
cylinder swing system delivers 
y^\*~~\ maximum torque in the working 
igCj \ arc. When swinging at 90° to the 








4 machine, end 



damping on the 
closing side of each pist:.-. dampsjput shock 
loadings and reduces s'.rtss on thesystem. the 
machine, and the operator. 

The double-actir.r tush/puU swing 
cylinders deliver an irripressive 21 ,000lb.-f:. 
(23.5 kSm) of swing torque for digging, lifting 
or machine repositioning. 

With the optional jtdeshift rear 
frame the machine car. oe positioned^* 
next :o existing structures and still 
dig carailel without major machine repositioning. 

Sideshift machines ire used on highway maintenance, 
to minimize interference with traffic for example. Easy side tc 
side movement is provided by a specially roiled rail section. 
Positive locking of the kingpost carriage is ensured by 
four large hydraclarr.ps. and swift and smooth boom swing 
is provided by a constant torque rack-and-pinion 
mechanism, incorporating large diameter pistons with end 
damping to cushion against overtravel. 





In both cases, the narrow backhoe boom helps to 

achieve an optimum strength-to-weight ratio 

while also giving superb visibility into a trench. 

The I2fr.2m. (3.7m) outside stabilizer foot 

a yl I spread on centermount machines or 8ft. (2.4m) 

ity^ Sferg^ st abilizer spread on sideshift machines, 

\ y ^ZZS^ X g ; - ves excellent stability, which :an be 

SjJi.k ^"^crjs^ enhance:: bv ootiona: street oaot :or 

either macnineor oy cua. :unct::n 
-irri.-ng i f.ip-over pads for centermount machines. 

A stress-relieved structure. 3 In. (75rr.m) 
kin? post connection pin, and heavy duty steel castings at the 
highest load points help to prolong boom and dipper life, as 
well as contribute to the impressive performance statistics of 
the backhoe unit The backhoe oilers: 

* 1 4 ft. Sin. '4. 4m.) digdepth and 1 7 ft. Sin. f z.4m) reach 

* 1 1 .450 lbs. r 5.!94kgs.) bucket breakout force ana 
5.490 lbs. (2.243kg>:.) dipper 
digging force for excellent hard 
ground trenching ability 

* '20 1 3 bucket rotation angle 
for fast and accurate footings 
and square holing, as well as 
less spillage when truck 
loading 

» 3.960lbs. (I,7Q6kgt.) dipper 
lift capacity at 3 ft. (2.4m) 
above the ground. 

With ail hoses channeled 
inside the bcom and dipper, theJCS backhoe is more able 
than most :o resist site damage. 

With theoptional Extracigsystem with up to '. '. .200 lbs. 
(5.!25kgs.) breakout force and two- position tippinglinkas 
standard! to extend or retract thedipper by up :o43;n. '.2m> 
without breaking the digging cycle, its already exceptional 
capabilities can be stepped up still further. 

j Through reducing the 




Sidcmuc rean'rime. 




numoerot times 



— .acnine 



neecs to oe mo*, ed :: r.eips 
substantial!', improve 
excavating performance. 
' Extracig is a Toin. l.2:ni 
extension. -^ r.:ch cue : o 
maximum strength backhoe 
geometry translates :o a -roin. 
:'. '.nm ■ extra disdeoth. 



II 



SETTING 



THE STANDARDS BY 

WHICH OTHERS 

ARE JUDGED. 



From a one-man company founded just over 40 vears 
ago. JC3 has grown ir.:o one of the largest privately our.rci 
manufacturers of construction, earthmoving and material 
handling equipment. 

Through makin? constant and massive investments in 
the latest production technoioify. the company's factor.- is 
today one of the most advanced in the world. 

3y leading the he.d in innovative research and design. 
extensive testing and stringent quaiity control. JCB's 
machines are renowned ail over the world for performance. 
reliability and value. 

As shown throughout this brochure the latest 
generation 1400B backhoe loader continues JCB"s tradition 
for buiiding the best — and settling for nothing less. 

As shown on pazes 3-1 I. JCS's i-rCOB also achieves the 
highest levels of performance in ever/ category — and sets 
the standards by which :thers are judged. 

A HARD WORKING 
LOADER. 

Benefitting from many vears of refinement, the design 
and construction of :hc*C3 loader set it apart from all 
others. 

The loader is ootrz. :ti by a simple, but incredibly 
strong, heavy duty t :• .incer hydraulic geometry. 
providing maximum resilience to twist and distortion by 
.•.nifcrmiy distributing operating forces throughout the 
whole structure — a." enhancing productivity and 
maneuverability by gr. tng the operator excellent vision 
between the loader arms. 
It also has automatic 
up-and-down mechanical 
self-leveling. This avo-.da : ^N 

material spillage by 
maintaininnthe 
ijucket-to-viround ar.ee 
throughout th«* lift ar-: 
Liftif.c vuth :i"fk-< is ,:■-..:.•. 
«;:r. pi tried b\ •r.\:v.\\\w:..:- ~~ »—"""•* V:-** ■>(", 'hxr ■'•' iff,' 

::'.<■ :r-:c. to aicstanti 1 • •''••' "• 

correct the iuad .invjii-. •< th 

•.\ ;: c:; ,i::i:v^ a:'.0 pt.n.: ' .' .1 .< a\.'.. ..::<: w ;\ci\ remc>vt:ii» ,:i'.C 

iiW\ rr::vj; .1 ic;id. 

The ii'.c; ■'")< •!•.;;:■ ■:: ! ' a: iz' ■■-'•'■'■'■■■' ■■tv.jit'.rrrhv.f -)ri:u ::"■ 








/ - 



;i :• - .-:• 



:arr:c-.i ::', jtri 



i *. i ■ l ; 1 1 ; 

[■ li'lf' 



...... T " 



; •■ .(•■•'.) . 
.i::it ;::n; 







For easy servicing, che powertrain is componeruized, 
and che hood is of soli: design. Routine maincenance items 
are grouped in one area, and there are also fuel and 
hydraulic tank clean-outs. 

The 4-speed gearbox with all synchromesh shift 
ncorporaces an innovative fast-acting reversing shuttle 
vhich helps the operator achieve the fastest possible cycle 
•rr.es with the least possible effort by using electric control 
o take all the hard wcr!< out of direction selection and 
rar.smission cieccup.ir.g. 

And for powerful, end progressive braking the braking 
system is compensates, self-adjusting, immersed in oil and 
hydraulically actuate! to avoid the wear and adjustment 
associated with mecha.-.icai linkages. The compensating 
design ensures the bra.<es operate together when both 
pedals are used together. The result is a calanced brake 
effort which still allow; independent brake operations when 
r.eeced for on-site maneuverability. The discs are 
additionally mour.tec .-.board to prevent contamination 

mo _-. ted tiirectlv or.to me a\ie shafts to xeep the w hole axie 



COMFORTABLE \ 
OPERATING AREA. ~~1 

Every JCB backhte loader has bee: - , designed ;o keep 
iterator at his most oroductive by keeping him at his 
: comfortable, rign.t throughout che entire work daw 
A Swstram suspension scat •■ adjustable .or reach.. 
.- c. rake and boc.y.. eight ' also puts him w ithin easy 
it nfail cheoocratrngcontmN. The instrument oaneland 







audio/visuai warning i\ items .ire alvJ m o:< - .->e proximitv. 
For hackhee '>neratiu!i. there are the option-, o; either 

4-levcror j- or 4-ie-.er with too c-> wing :.- excavator ■ ISO 1 
pattern controls, together with a standard rer.ioce rear 
mounted engine stop. 

For loacter operation, there is a pushbutton 
transmission disconnect fin the loader :e - . er to deliver full 
engine power to :he loader hydraulics w nen greater 
breakout force or operating speeds are needed. 

In addition, both the loader and backhoe can be 
operated simultaneously by feathering the controls to 
reposition or walk the machine. 

A simple H configuration shift pattern, steering 
column mounted forward. 'reverse shuttle control. 
independent foot brake pedals for spin turns, stalk mounted 
lamp and w iper controls. rccl<er-t'. oe foot pedal for optional 
powered backhoe attachments are all standard equipment. 

A stiffened r.cor isolated from, the chassis by resilient 
mountings keeps vibration to a minimum. 



OPTIONAL CAB. 



l'27cu.ft. j.Otta 
plenty of elbow roc: 
walk-through acres 
by a sloping hood a 
cc'.vp. to noor .eve:. 



. T..} of interior spate gives the operator 
■p.. Two large doors provide easy 
s. and all around visibility is enhanced 
adoOsc.it. o.o*.'.".."!. 3t glass windows 
tinted as standard, and ooe.ninz ;o hand 




or full width for ventilation. ■ The doors and side wit 
can also be remcv en complete!* for particular;;.' hot 
Heaw interior cladding and a sound absorbent 
lining keep noise le\ ris dow ; 
to only 30ri3- A .the lowest 
among comparable 
machines. Thought rut I v 
designed to the List, tne 
JCB can be equipped with 
;\ir conditii 'ttuig. a men is 
mounted in : he . < i. 

ofeomtbr: 3- ::\ the canop* 
and cab '. c:mi ■•> .".re roil ••■ - 
and raising ■ •' - .'■ "■" 'feet:*. ' 
unci ear:-, full S.Oi'> FU:'> 



1COUS 

days.) 

roof 




EFFICIENT 



■a 





DOUBLE PUMP 



HYDRAULICS. 



Combining m 
consumption, the : 
to operate at 3.300 ps: 
and breakout force a: 
operating speed ac e: 

In addition, the 
hydraulic pumps wi: 
according to ground 



mum performance with minimum fuel 
ue JCB hydraulic system is designed 
•227 bar). As a result, excellent lifting 
e achieved without sacrificing 
gnomical engine rpm. 
svscem brings together dual cast steel 
- an unloading valve to regulate flow 
ronditions. a feature which, for normal 




damping. 



•YDRAULIC CYLINDER AND 
CYLINDER BARREL. 



backhoe or loacer 
together for high s: 
reauired. this svste 



•a:ion. enables both pumps to work 
:. Or when high breakout forces are 
iiverts the secondary ourrtD so that 



full engine pouer is feci to either the main pump or 
transmission — wherever it's needed most. 

The result is maximum engine efficiency. Which, in 
turn, leads to lower fuel and maintenance costs. 

There's also the benefit of extremely smooth and 
accurate backhoe and loader controls — which keeps 
operator fatigue to the minimum. Optional backhoe 
controls in either four lever configuration, three or four lever 
with footswing or ISO excavator patterns allow the 
customizing of machine operation based on operator 
requirements or preference. 

Furthermore, the double pump system is not just 
designed for optimum productivity, but for total reliability 
and long life. The cylinders, for instance, have widely 
spaced gland and piston bearing surfaces to resist bending, 
plus O-ring outer seals, impact absorbing end cushions, and 
extra strong friction welded eye end joints. 

Clean hose runs prevent snagging. While a magnetic 
core in the 20 micron niter keeps the fluids within them free 
of contaminants to prolong pump and valve life. 

The system as a whole is also simple in design, and 
based on components produced solely for JCB machines, 
meaning that any faulc diagnosis is quick, and that 
maintenance is both simple and inexpensive. This also 
means that the installation of optional items such as the 
JC3 Hammermaster, or any other approved proprietary 
hvdraulic. or mechanical attachment is a simDle arocess. 



HIGH PERFORMANCE 



POWERTRAIN. 




Based on the first and only axles ever built specifically 
for backhoe loaders, the unique JCB Max-Trac axles use 
oucboard planetary reduction and self locking torque 
proportioning differentials :o always apply the drive power 
to where it's needed most — the wheels with the best grip. 
In combination with the optional 4-w'neel drive, and 
always automatically engaged, the Max-Trac system 
enables the machine to cope with even the most difficult site 
conditions and gradients, without "he steering problems, 
prematurely worn drive shafts or excessively worn tires 
associated with conventional diff-lock systems. 

For flexible engine power, the Max-Trac system is 
linked to a revolutionary Perkins Quadram high efficiency 
combustion powerpack. precisely matched to the torque 
converter and weight of the machine. It combines low fuel 
consumption with low noise levels (further enhanced by flex 
mounting of the engine and transmission!. Additionally, a 
powerful 65 amp alternator produces a high output for 
idling, cold climates and accessories. 




Outixurd jl.iiK'Mi'v ri'ducv.mi .nut 
-t-it'.ucscm-.: roinuu pronurv.i'iuinj ttiifcrsimal. 



.*■; "• ^GENERAL DIMENSIONS ;. • :'. 


NOTE: Dimensional and operational specification* are based on unit equipped 
with IILX 16 10 PR laborer front tires. 16.9 X 24 10 PR industrial rear tires. 
1 cu.yd. loader bucket on centermount. 1.25} cu.yd. loader bucket on sideshift, 
24 in. (6!0mm) backhoe bucket and all other standard equipment. Machine in 
crave! position. 


Overall length 


Centermount 


24ft. Tin. (7.40m) 




Sideshift — backhoe straight 


24ft. Sin. (7.44m) 




Sideshift — backhoe to side 


20 ft. 3 in. (6.17m) 


Overall width 


Centermount 


7h.\\n.(2.24m) 


1 


Sideshift 


3ft. Oin. (2.44m) 


| Tread width 


Front 


5ft. 1 Oin. (1.78m) 




Rear 


5ft. Sin. (1.63m) 


Travel height 


Standard backhoe 


lift. 3 in. (3.43m) 




Extending dipper 


lift. 7 in. (3.52m) 




Top of cab 


9ft. 3 in. (2.32m) 




Too ofcanoov 


9ft. 3 in. (2.32m) 


Center of gravity 


In front of rear axle 


18 in. (0.46m) 




from ground 


20in. (OJlm) 


Wheelbase 


2WD 


83 in. (2.11 m) 




4WD 


35 in. (2.16m) 


Minimum ground d 


earance at centeriine 


13 in. (0.46m) 


L 




15 in. (033m) 


I 


sideshift at stabilizer 


1 1 in. (0.23m) 



Center of front wheel to grille 



2 WD 



24 in. (0.61 m) 



4WD 



22 in. (056m) 



1 Cradeability 


Fwd/Sev 




Fwd/Rev | 


| 1st gear 


1 in 2.3/; in 2.5 


2nd gear 


1 in 2.5/ i in 2.5 


3rd gear 


1 in 4/1 :n4 


4th gear 


1 in 5.5/1 in 5.25 


j Note: 1 in 2.5 = 

'. in 5.5 = 


40", 1 in 4.0 = 25% 
13% i in o.25 = 16% 







Drawbar pull: engine a; maximum rpm. corque converter stalled: 



st gear 11. 243 "or 'S.lGOky.) 



2nd gear 3.3771bs. (3.300k v .A 



2 rd gear 4.530'.bs. <'2.100kgf.) 4th jear 


2.425 ibs. (I.100k i :.i\ 


j Shipping weight (approximate): 

; Complete backhoe '.oacer with standard equioment and 2 

! bucket: 


1 
4 in. (610mm) backhoe 


! Centermount 2WD 


4\VD 


ICanooy 13.3001b*. '6.260kv.) 


1 4.3 10 lbs. (6. 491 kg:.) 


i Cab l*.490lbs. (5J73ktt.) 


IS.OCOIbs. '6.304 k?:.) 


i Sideshift 2WD 


4WD 


! Canopy 14.3C0lbs. (6.436k ts.) 


I4.3l0lbs. (6.718k(s.) 


1 Cab U.bOOIbs. (6.623 kit.) 


15.U01bs. (6.834kts.i 


\ Noise levels: External level at 23 ft. Oin. (7 m) at governed 


engine rom. 75dB(A). I 


SERVICE CAPACITIES 


I 2AVD 


WD 



Cooiin< svstem 






3.6 L'Scal. 


(13.61: 


1 6 L'S cal. '13.611 


Fuei rank 






2+.0US<ra 


. (00.31 i 


24.0 L'S al. (0O.3H 


Engine oil with rilter 






2.3 L'S *al. 


! 10.6!) 


2.3 L'S ?al. (10.SH 


| S\ nchro Shuttle transmission wi 
! niter 


h 


5 L'Stral. 


(Ht.dll 


5 5 L'S nl. '20.3d 


Rear axle 






: 4 i's._Mi. 


•2H.01: 


7.4 L'S eal. m.0h 



^SLOADERTERJEp^lAN [ 



Bucket size — itandard 



Centermount I.Ocu.vd. (0.77nr) 



Sideshift l.25cu.vd. (O.Otim , 



Lift capacttv — to full height 



6.500 lbs. (22>43k { t. ) 



Breakout force 



Bucket 1 1 ,500lbs. (52lSkjt.) 



Loader arms 


ll.OCOlhs. NJKOkgt.) | 


| Dimensions at full height • 


Clearance at 45* dump 


3ft. 3in. /2.5V m) 


Bucket hinge oin 


I Oft. 9 in. (3.23 m) 


| Maximum operating height 


12ft. 11 in. (3.04m) 


Maximum dump angle 


+5* j 


Reach at 45* dump 


2ft. 7in. (0.70m) 


Reach — bucket on ground 


5ft. Oin. (132m) 


Rollback — maximum at ground 


45* 


Digging depth — bucket Sat 


4in. (0.10m) 


Angle of approach 


64* : 


Angle of departure 


13* 



1 Front avie dill'erenf.ai 






4 n L'S ;ai. 


15.51: 


; Front a\!rs. hubs eac?. 






0.3 L'Stfal. 


tun 1 


I Hv crauiic tank 


lOOLS.-al 


r?l.3t! 


19.0 US gal 


trmx | 


1 Hydraulic svstem including :ank 


34 L'S sal 


r 123.71 


i 34 L*S sal 


. (123.71 1\ 


; Hvsraulic rilter 


0.7 L'S gal. 


: it ■ 


: L'S gal. 


■2.61 I 


I Sideshift swing actua:r»r 


i.: LSc.ii 


*... • 


i 1 L'S gal. 


'-*•' 1 



Loader cycle rimes at 2200 rpm 



Arm raised to full height 


3.7 sees. i 


Bucket dump 


1.3 sees. 


Arms lowered — powerdown 


2.4 sees. 


Arms lowered — return to dig 


3.0 sees. 



3ucke: rollback 1.4 sees. 





Loader buckets 




General purpose 


Standard - 


- Centermount. Not available 


— Sideshift 


j 


Heaped caoacitv 


1 cu.yd. .'fl.77.-jrj 


i 


Struck capacitv 


0.35cu.vd. '0.35m-', 




Width 


33in. (2*4mi 




Weight 


790 Ibs. (3S3kgt.) 



Teeth 



Standard — Sideshift. Optional — Centermount 



r.eaoes caoacttv 



l.25cu.vd. iO.Xar) 



Struck caoacitv 



l.lcu.vd. 0.35m 1 ; 



Width 96 in. (2.44m) 



Weighs 3401bs. (231kg:.) 



Teeth 



Multi-purpose — Options for Centermount and Sideshift 



Heaped cap. I.I cu.vd. (0.35m-) 



Heaped cap. 1. 25 CU.vd. (0.06m-: 



Struck cap. 0.96 cu.vd. (0.74m-/ 



Struck cap.'- l.lcu.vd. (0.35m-) 



Width 33 1 n. (2.24ml 



Width 961n. (2.44ml 



Weight l.590lbs. (Tllkp. 



Weight I.'OOIbs. 'TTlkgt.) 



Teeth i 



::h 9 



!".amu force 5 . 39 T I h s . i2.575<igt. 



Camp :"orce 5.397 Ibs. i 2.675kgr. 



Jaw ootniaj 3ft. 1 in. ,0.04 mi 



Jaw opening J ft. I in. 04m) 



STEERING 



T\ pe: Front wheel hydrostatic power steering with manual uauabilitv in the 
r-.er.t of engine or indraulic po^er failure. Independent of main hyaraulic 
astern. 

; Pump: 1 X s ' f ar 

1 W irk-.ng pressure: 1 .7 50osi i I 2 1 har ! 



: Ma\imum tiow tgpm<: 12 total 'juiaut at 2.200 rpm -jifmi 
| Veering \ .iK e: Open center, nou reacti\ e *.\ pe 
! Flow ro val\ r i gain i : 7.2 controlled vOv* to^ake 27:sui' 
; C'i::Mrrv ier HvdraulicS 



* 



STATIC DIMENSIONS 



lift. 3 in. (3.4 jm) 
'l[(l.7\n.(3J3m) 




L-6ft. Win. (2.1 lm)-»\ 



2+ft. 5in. (7.44m)- 



PERFORMANCE DIMENSIONS 

Figures marked * are for Extradig 
Extended 



T.-eid width: 



r ront . 



5ft. lOin. (1. 73m) 
Reir 

5ft. 5in. (l.S3m)~ 

Overall width 
it bucket 



7ft. 4in. (3J4mi -CM 
8ft. Oin. (2.44m) - SS 




-12S.2m. (j.Tlm) 



•\lU.<}:n.l4J0 
t7ft. 3 in. (3.30m i 
'-Oft. Urn. r4.33m> 



ill 

7'7I 



Centermount 



♦ft. t in. (U*iai | 

-3ft. Oin. (2.44m)~- 

Sideshift 



15ft. Oin. (4.30m) 
■tSft. 11 in. \3.T7m) I I 



POWERTRAIN 



! Componentized powertram mounted in an integral chassis on resilient 
j mountings. Power transmitted through torque converter and JCB Synchro 
Shuttle tranjmuiion to JC3 torque proportioning drive axle hv drive shaft. 
I Powertram protection by Audio/ Visual monitoring svstem. 



Eogine specifications 



2 WD 



4WD 



Manufacturer and .Tiodel 



Perkins 1004 4HR Perkins 1004 THR 



Disolacement 



243cu.in. Ulilrrt) 



Number of cvlinders 



3ore and stroke 



3.93" X S.OOin. (100mm X I27mml 



Cvcle 



.Aspiration 



Natural (?\VDi Turbochargcd (4WD) 



Comoression ratio 



16.5:1 



Main bearing 



Horsepower 2WD 



4W'D 



* 



I . SAE gross 74 @ 2.2CO rpm !553kW) 



33 (§ '2.200 rum (62k\V) 



2. SAE net 



70 'S 2.200 rpm fSZSklV) 



30 (2 2.200 rpm (SOW) 



Max torque 2WD 



4UD 



I. SAE gross 2C8lb.-ft. @ I .200r?m l232.\'m) 223ib.-ft. @ 1.200rpm (309Xmi 



2. SAE nee 2031b.-ft. @ '..2C0rpm tf~5.V«j 223lb.-ft. @ I.200rpm fjW.V/n, 



Fuel, lubrication and cooling systems 



r uei tvoe 



#2 Diesel 



Fuel Slter 



Singie scage. 5 micron replaceable cartridge and water separator 



Fuel sucpiv j Direct injection from rotarv injection sumo 



.Air cleaner 



Dr.' cvclonic replaceable element with safetv niter 



OU niter 



Full Sow, spin an cartridge 



Lubrication 



Positive pressure 



Cooling system | Liquid, pressurized — " psi Ssuri 



| Suction 



Electrics 



Svstem 



12 volt 



3atterv 



120 amp hour — 730 cold ranking amps it 32* F CfC) 



3CI group 



31 



Alternator 



Brakes 



Service brake — tvoe 1 H-.crauiicallv actuated fuilv enclosed, oil immersed 



Operation 



2 foot pedals for indeoer.cent or simultaneous operation 



Diameter 



Friction area oer brake! 2C0sa.in. .'0.13'ir) 



Parking brake, tvpe j Caliper disc on dri\ e shaft 



Operation 



Independent of service brakes bv hand lever 



Diameter 



in. (273 mm i 



Friction area oer brake 4.7sq.in. (30.3sq.cm) 



Tires 



Front Standard: U L-i'5 10 PS 



Rear Standard: 16.9 x 2+ 10 PR 



Ootional: 1 1 L- 16 '.2 PR 



Ootional: 19.5 L-2+ 10 PR 



Ootional: 1-.5L-15 :2?R 



Ootional: I9.5L-2 + 12 PR 



Standard t"A°D oniv 14.9-17 j 6 PR 



Ootional •VYDonlv: '.4.0-17.5 IQPRI 



Transmission 



T-oe 



JC3 $» nvhro Shuttle 



Soerds 



+ For.» ird And Reverse 



">>. nenromzed 



All <rars 



Selection 








1 


Hand '.ev er 


1 


Disconnect 








1 


Foot dedal and hand ooeraied huiton 


i 


Gear ratios i 


Forward 


'. i! 


- 


3 


3 5 


. 2nd — 3.44 I i Reverse ! -it — j jj:l 


2nd - 3.44:1 | 




3rd 






33 


! *th - : JO:! ! 3rd - 1.33:1 


4th - i iiV! ! 



Toraue converter 



Tvoe 



Single stage, dual phase Hvdrokinetic 



Size 



1 1 in. , 230mmi 



Stall i 



2.3:1 



Axles — rear drive (2 WD and 4WD1 



Type I [C3 Torque Proportioning with Max-Trac se-.f locking diffe rential 

Final drivel Outboard planetarv 



Ratios 



Ratings 



Primarv: 2.92:1 



Static: 35.0OOIbs. (2i.j43ky.) 



Final: 5.40:1 



Dynamic: 27.300lbs. (12.f74ky.) 



Overall: 15.78:1 



SAEJ43: I3.370lhs. (620! k ( t.) 



Front axles (2WD and 4.VVD1 



Oscillation angle: 3* * 3* 1 Steer angle: 33* * 35* I Steer ram: Double acting 



Ratings 



Static 36.300 lbs. (J&jtSirtj 



Dynamic: l3.2S01bs. (3.233 kit. ) 



SAE J43: 1 1. 342 lbs. '3J72kjt.i 



Froat axles front drive/steer (4WD oniv> 



Tvoe | fCB Toraue Prooortiomng with Max-Trac se 


[flocking differential I 


Final drive 


1 Outboard ol 


anetarv 




! 


Ratios: 


1 Primarv 3.00:1 


1 Final: 5.40:1 




1 Overall: 6.20:1 I 


Turning circle 






1 2WD 




! 4WD 


Turns-lock/lock 


1 Clockwise 


14.25 




1 +.73 




1 Counter-clockwise 


1 3.50 




1 +.C0 


Outside bucket: 


1 L'nbrcked 


1 33ft.2in.f70. 


m 


1 36*t. Sin. (11.13-ni 1 


Outside wheels: 



L'nbraked 



I l'h.T\n.'3.ronti ! 23ft. iOin. i'3.73mi 



t 


! 3raked 


1 25 ft. 3in. -7 


Trai ! 27ft. 2 in. '3.23m: 


i 


Travel 


SDeeds 




j Forward 


lit — 3 7— .oh HS.Oithi 


! Reverse 


In — 2. 7. -nor. o.Jkahi 


1 


2nd — S.Onoh 'O'kshi 


1 


2.-.C — 5.0 moh <9.7ksai 


! 


3rd — 1 '..2 —.oh '13.0 kohl 


] 


3rd — I l.2moh ''13.0ks.Ti 1 



th — 20.5rr.ah i'33.2ioh) 



4th — 20 6 m oh ''33. 2 ion: 



HYDRAULICS 



Hvdraulic svstem 



System relief pressure 



Svstem tvoe: Open center 



Main relief valve: J.JCOpsi 223iar 



I PumD type: 2 X positive 
| displacement, gear 



Oi?.oader vaive: S.GCOosi '207'iar: 



Pumo caoacitv 



Filmdon: 



Combined: 33.5 gpm ':271pm) 



Return iine rtlter with magnet and 
replaceable cartridge element 



Pump I: 15 3?om i'6-f'smi 



Filter surface area: 532 30. in. :0.44;a.rt. 



Pumo 2: l5.3gom fS-Him) 



Nominal rating: 20 micron 



Tnis hvdrauiic circuit responds to :he operators needs by automatically adjusting the I 
pump now to provide speed for fas: cycles or power for hard dig conditions. Hvdraulic ; 
attachments, such as the E.xtracig' extending dioper. the JC3 Hammermaster and j 
portable tools are easv ;o install on this standard circuit. 



Hvdrau 


ic cvlinders 


1 all cvlinders are double acting) 


i 


Function 


Quandty 


Bore 

' in. ("mm) 


Saoke 1 Rod Diameter . 

in. (mm) 1 in. (mm) 


3oom 




i 


! *¥i„rt;o> 


lZVs'373) 1 


2>'. '70< 


1 Diooer 




j 


+ ' 102) 


30 ■ 762' i 


2 1 -: foVl 


1 Diooer extension 




I 


1 ". ' 70} 


«•.'• 11.070) \ 


'.■-.'33) 


1 3ucket — std b/h 


oe 


I 


! Vh(3B) 


1 JO '762) i 


2 '•'« '60) 


j 3ucket — Extradig 


I 


1 3 , -:/.ft» 


1 JO (762) 1 


2 '51 > 


| Stabilizer — CM 




1 2 


1 + f!02l 


1 19^' i-lOS) 1 


2 v «<o*0) 1 


1 Stabilizer — SS 




i 2 


1 2". t"0\ 


1 25V: (6-fS) 1 


I '■: >33) 


( Swing - CM 




i 


\ MI92\ 


1 ll'/.^Wi 1 


2'<"60> ! 


1 Swing — SS 




1 2 


! iVtatllOl 


1 3 V » l'' > ' > ' , ) I 


— 


! Loader arm 




• 


1 J 1 »<71) 


1 23 '/. '713) 1 


2 •SI) 


1 Loader bucket 




• 


IV, '70) 


1 2S':/7!,1i 1 


2 -3D 


1 Sieenng 




I 


1 2", .70) 


1 3V. .210: 1 


l-".'i«' 


1 


N 


ote: ootional 


oortable hvc 


raulic tools 




! 3rra<ier — 67!hs. : 


"M 


;t. class. Water pumo — >uomersible — *50«om ' l.tOjiti"'- 


I 3reaker - 37 lbs. 


;?> 


.". c:a>s. W i: 


-r-inm-i — submersible — !75?om .' i!7'-9ms. • 


| Timyr 



B ACKHOE PERFORMANCE 



<rf 



hoe operational data (SAC) 
nine equipped «ith 
t6l0mmi bucket! 



F.xtrridia 



iSid/3-hoc 



Retracted 



Ex tended 



| Dig death — SAE 



fc-in. (m) 



ft. -in. (ml 



ft.-in.fnt) 



I Max. - w/normaldutv bucket- 114-5 /^.j3; 1 14-0 (4.J/I | 17-10 /5.«) 



Max. - -/deep profile bucket \\i-lQ (4.52) \n.3N.JO1 \ \3-Z (5J6) 



!ft. :SlOmmi flat bottom 



> 1 4-4 14.37) I 13- 1 1 1 4.24i I 1 7-9 (5.41) 



2ft. iSlOmmi flat w/deep profile 



14-9/AJ0J 



14-4 f07) 



13-2 C5_3V> 



Reach From rear axle centcrline I 22-0/5. 77 J |2I-7/5.j3j I 23-2 (7.67) 



From swing pivot centerline I I "-3 (5.33) \ 1 7-4 /i..'<5V | 20- 1 1 f5J3j 



Swing pivot to rear axle j 4-4 f! 32) | 4- 3 i7.J0) 



i 4-3 f7 JOJ 



CM — to side from stabilizer I ',1-5 (3.51) 



II -2(3.40) \\Jr-<i(4.50) 



55 - to side from stabilizer j 13-9 'V.30; 1 13-4 /f 67; 13-11 (5.77) 



Reach at clearance height 1 5-4 (1.63) | 4-10 11.47) | 3-2 (2.40) 



Height 



Max. - fullv raised i ! 7-7 (5.36) | 1 7-0 (3. 13) \ 19-4 (5.39) 



Loading clearance height 



10-10 (3.30) I 11-7 (5.53) | 13-10 (432)~ 



Bucket rotation 



133/201* 



1 33/20 1" 



135/201* 



Swing ire 



iao" 



130* 



130* 



Stabilizer spread — outside pads '• ft--in. (m) \ fx-in. (m) | fc-in. (m) 



Centermount 



12-2 (3.56) \ 12-2 13.56) \ 12-2 (3.56) 



3-0 (2.44) 



\l-0'2.44) 



\Z-0(2.44) 



Leveling angle — max grade backhoe will dig vertical cut 



Cente 



15* 



15* 



1 



Sideshift 6.3* 



16.3* 



6.3* 



Cround clearance — minimurn ft.-in. (m) 



ft.-in. (m) 



ft.-in. (m) 



Centermount 



■0.56) 



I 1-2 0.36i 



I 1-2 (036) 



4m5I±l 



Sideshif: 10-10(0.25) JQ-10 (0.25} \ 0-10(0.2$) 



force - SAE 



lbs, ikgs.) \ lbs, (kg!.) I lbs, (kgt.) 



\ Dipper cylinder 




■ 6.490 12:344) 


| 5.545 '2360) 


\ 4.560 12.063) 


j 3ucke: r.linder 


speed 


9.930 (4.504) 


\ 9.350 (4,466) 


1 9.350 (4.463) 



1.430 (5.194)1 1 1.300 3.1251] 1 1.300 fJ./2S)| 



I Lift caoacity: 3ucke: fitted, in pour.cs/ kilos. Figures taken from lift charts. 
! 3oom lift with dioper fully rotate- so. dipper lift .»ith boom at 63*. See lift 
! char: 3 "or more detail. 



Lift caoacirv 



Ibs.tkgt.) I lbs. f k%t.i [ lbs. (Jtgs.) 



3oom. full reach at ground 



2.470 ■■1320! I 1.950 '335 1 I 1.230 (553) 



Diooer at 3 ft. (2.44m) heignt 



j Swing torque 



3.960 (1.756) I 3.710 •1.533) | 2.200 {003) \ 

i 1 1 

lb.-ft.rA.Vm) |lb.-ft.fJLVmJ ; lb.-ft. (kiSm) \ 



1 


Centermount 


1 21.000 (23. 5) 


1 JI.000 ■- 


'3.5) 


1 21.000 (23.5) 


i 


Sideshift 


3)325(13. 


!3) 


1 9.725 (13.13) 


1 9.725 (13.13) 


! Cycle times @ 


2.200 rpm 


1 




1 




i 


i 3oom 


Cv Under extend 


[4.2 sees. 




1 4.2 sees 




I 4.2 sees. 


| 


Retrac: 


U.l sees. 




1 1.1 sees. 




li.l sees. 


| Dipper 


Cvlinder extend 


-.3 sees. 




i 2 3 sees. 




i 2.3 sees. 



Re-.rac: ! 3 sees. 



3 sees. 



1.3 sees. 



i Bucket C-. Under extend 


2.1 sees. 


i 2. 1 sees. 


!2.l sees. 


Retract 


1.3 sees. 


! 1 3 sees. 


1 1.3 sees. | 


| Swing - 90* to center i | 


Centermount 


1 2.3 sees. 


I 2.3 sees. 


1 2.3 sees. 


1 Sideshif: 


3.3 sees. 


1 1 ■ 

• J. 3 sees. 


|2.3,ees. | 


' Em dinuer Cylinder extenc. 




i - 


l4.J sees. 


Retract 


- 


1 _ 


! 2.9 sees. 


Stamper Centermount extend 


i. 1 sees. 


1 i. 1 sees. 


i i 1 sees. 


g§ Retrac: 


! 4 2 sees. 


1 - : ,e,-s. 


! 4 2 sees. | 


1 Hidesmil e\:eno 


. 2.6 iees. 


| 2.3 >ees. 


! 2 6 sees. 


' Rerrar! 


: d -,->•<. 


1 J s .ees 


i : a m 



' 


Backhoe 


buckets 


1 


l L Size 


Capacity | 


cu.ft./m J ) 


Size ICaoacitv 


lOi.h.lm') 


| 12in. 
1 (505mm) 


Heaoed | 


2.2 (0.06) 


24-.n. | Heaoed 


\ a.o rajjj 


Struck 


2.1 (0.06) 


W«"H Struck 


\ 63 (0.17) 


! 


Weight 


\:i\hi.(70kn.) 


1 Weight 


1 3l4lbs. C/V?igr.J 


I 


Teeth 1 


3 1 


1 Teeth 


i + 1 


tbin. 
(406mm) 


Hea D ed 1 3.3 (0.00) 


JOin. ] Heaoed 


1 3.5 (0.23) 


Struck 


3.0 (0.03) 


l'''' n "i\ Struck 


\S.Q(0.l6i 


I Weight | 


200H». 191 kit.) 


1 Weight 


|3551t».fW/*'*j 




Teeth 


3 


1 Teeth 


15 


13in. 


Heaoed 


4.3 (0. 12) 


36 in. I Heaped 


1 10.5 rO.271 


(457mm) 


Struck 


3.0 10.03) 


P"*w| Struck 


! 7.3 (0.20) 


| Weight 


225 lb». (I03k t t.) 


| Weight 


|435lb«. (I97k%u) 


| | Teeth 


13 


1 Teeth 


15 






24in. 
(510mm) 


Heaoed 


$.0(0.16) 


1 1 I 


Struck 


*.b(0.l2) 


1 ! 1 


| Weight 


3l0tbs. (Nlkp.) 


1 i 1 


I Teeth 


4 


Backhoe buckets — heaw dutv 


13in. 


Heaoed 


\*.5(0.12) 


30in. | Heaoed 


l9.0W.2JJ 


(457mm) 


Struck 


\\A(0.12) 


f'«'W"^| Struck 


|7.7i'0.2/J 


r 


Weight 


1 250 lbs. (U3kgt.) 


! Weight 


|375lbs.(":"<**?rJ 


1 1 Teeth 


[3 


I ! Teeth 


|5 




24in. | Heaped 


\o.9(0.!0) 
1 5.0 (0 16) 
|3101bs. (I4lk%t.) 


| 26 in. ! Heaoed 


1 11.2 '4.25; 


(610 mm) | 5(njck 
1 Weight 


j f3.'T«m/! 3traek 
1 ■ Weight 


19.4 fll.45) 

' 420!'os. : '.y)':>:.! i 


1 | Teeth 


|4 


• Tssth 


!6 ! 


Hydraulic jaw buckets 


j 13 in. |Heaoed 


\l.0'0.lrl 

I+.0W.//J 

| 560 lbs. (254 <>s.) 


i 24'in. i Heioea 


\ 7.0'0. 10; 


l r«/«lj j Struck 


1 f*»«»v;s„.j flk 


\S.Q(0.!Sj 


I j Weight 


I [Weight 


\62Q\bt. 33! k;:.) 


| I Teeth 


u 


! YjjjJj 


|4 


Tapered ditching buckets 



!30* 


! 56 in.- 1 5 in. 


1 l.liSmm-iSlmrn) 


1 -:c* 


1 42 la.- 12 -a. 


'!. 067 mm-305 mini 


: 


1 Heaoed 


I 2.3 C0.«tfi 


i 


1 Heased 


.4.0 3.11 ; 


1 


1 Weight 


1 -50ibs. <204'<v.; 


i 


'A'eigh! 


1 221 lbs. '/^;-rr.; 



I I I I 



1 r 1 



1 1. 
"2T 



^x \z~ 



Backhoe lifting chart 

JC3 1400B 2WD and 4WD centermount or sideshif: 
1 standard dipper. For extradig extended and retrace 
operator manual. 

l.T.ns chart shows the lifting 
eapacitx' with a 24in. 
(6l0mmi standara profile 
bucket fitted. 

2. All figures are theoretical. ' 
stated in pounds and 
kilos, and rated to 
3AEJ31 1987. 

! 3. Figure above the 
I line is the capacity 
over end. 

4. Figure below the line 
is through sv»ing arc. 

j.Stabilitv limited 
figures are identified 
I «uh-S\ 

1 •>. Machine fitted with 

1 eiuiiueruetvtht ijnllc. 

: 7. Small are is diouer lilt with 

1 lnjom at 03*. 

1 , . . . 

: .1. Larvje are is 300111 :itt. 

i 



in central position) 
lifting figures see 



U.-l 

I 

"C 



1 ! ! U -r 



r-.i 1 



"i. 1 1 



L, 

'"I 
—J 

,J" 

1 1 r 1 ' 



1 1 1 
1 1 1 



1 1 



j^ru 



I I u. 



I I I 



, / ■J'Z,!"'. I 


1 1 


1 1 ' ! y « .;■ "" 1 


■ : i ': ; •'. *•■ 1 : 1 


1 1 



.J 



.a 



PR< DUCT AND SALES SUPPORT 



FINANCE 

V«»«ir [C-H drairr i.'.;:: meet vniir :inai:c:!V^ •■'.••••.-. tr.ri ni^h j C3 
Flexilease .» htc:t liters :;iar.» tor Ic.imuu;. !cum - ■;ur;:h.i'»e> ■•% n:: • 
uuliiitii "tnioiiv installment sales omract.s .'.".; rer.tai tin ■•£:■:: tr.v 

WARRANTY * 

^taiiciani -l-\ vtarra:!'.\":irrivi(!es except - .' ~.v. coverage: 
'. yar standard ttiirnum . iniiiinvd in ;he-JC3 Certificate -a 
Warranty". 1 years on powertrnm. j \enrs mi «;riiccurai 
fabrications. Contact vourjC'3 dealer for tiet.i;ls. 

SERVICE 

JC 3 dealer «r\ ice people arc cum mil tec : j <eep \ 01 irJC 3 :p 
and running. AliJCB dealer mechanics are enrolled in on-tfoir.i: 



PARTS 

'C . li !V.l!ei> . mI'a eflirm .. .Cat!>>»'.« 
:;' : :>.'.i!> avaiiaiMiitv. jC 1$ .!!•••• '• ' 



43 HOUR PARTS GUARANTEE 



A'oi ■. our tlcaier r<jr c.e'.aui — ,C ~> 
v.icT"> .i guarantee lhai 3reaxdijun ::.i: - 
;-aier>hiu uithirt 4H hour-) c;r :::<: :;.'..-'■• .. 



:._:!•; .It tile 



REGIONAL PARTS DEPOTS 

7 i r : i ; e 13rc:akci :w n :).'.:': wwr tieaier mav ?>>'. ".v. : ::i itocs. 
'C 3 lias .iOD 'Same Da\ Dispatch'. fr.-:m '•••• ■'■ :•■■'> tiisirtnwion 



training programs and supported by experienced \ 


k_o t:ic. ae:-. ice 


jemersmtheLn 


tec: stales. arc. one 


" ■ _ ..r. ,*.c". .". ■ 




j 




. JCS's ranee of haexhoes incudes die i-lCOB. 1.3*03 ." 


1)3. Mlcemaitcra 


ic Suce: ^itemaater ;\:i 


i(ti70C3i:u.:'R.Ri •-: 


I.'::: --■■■; 


. . ' j in. 


f JJ'« i . 





SPECIAL PURPOSE ATTACHMENTS 

JC3 attachments Sited to machines when purchased, or switched from one rr.acr.tne to another greatly improve machine utilization, arc .-educe the 
-.eed to t:e up capital in other specialise equipment — x ever, eliminate ii entire: v. With the proven JC 3 Quick-ris car-.;;-;, swucninz attachments is as 
easy as 1-2-3. The ran^e of attachments available, ajar: from those shewn includes the extract^ extending uipper. Ja-.-. E-c.-tit. ?-..e Planter and 
Hydraulic Tools. JC3 manufactured attachments a.-e produced by manufacturing technology as advanced as that usee :or JC3 machines. These 
attachments carry i :uilJC3 warranty, ptus test cert-.r.cates where necessary. JC 3 machines are aiso '.\ei! rutted :or appropriate attachments made by 
;mer manufacturers, sum as t.-.e Auger shown beiow 






i (7$- 









•;t '-.' Oj-'! :.:rr:,if ■) 'at JfMfWi/W. 







1 'O'liT I. •'Illfi ,* , .'.'ff(".7"'. 



J '. 








^ 




Burfaio "3"> 3. ^ - - 3r2 

?cc.-es:er k t"51 2S-i-2*a5 

Svracusa 2' 5' ^^3.^6^3 

A.cafy ,:' 5' "35--;'-J 

'tVatsraxn 3' :'• rS3-:a ' 2 

s-cicca k 3C~ r~s-z-c^ 



Financinjj • Parts ■ Service ■ 




The Ultimate Value 



o~o o r aod-Ooob 



J •■> C .)J5 



Sc\z>50\ HID" EST 




BULLETIN 27-1 -ft- 



SHREDDER SCREEMEF40 PLOT 

_30'.':x40^-CQNVEYOR-# 4//x8!:2-DECIfcSeREEN ™-„— - 




I 



/MULTIPLE APPi iCATlONS ^g-E^^^^BB 



I 



O TOP SOIL 



O NURSERY O AGLIME 

O COMPOST O REMEDIATION O SAND & GRAVEL 

©SLUDGE PROCESS O RECYCLED ASPHALT O LANDFILLS 
| O CLAY O PEAT O COAL O ASH 



I 



* 



SCREENING PLANTS WITH FLEXIBILITY L 



jfp PORTEC 

~= =r ' Construction zQuiomen: Otvision 

KOLBERG PRODUCTS 



03/29/95 14:13 ©219 836 2838 



SEVENSON MIDWEST 



12)004 



.-^•-Cv 



STANDARD SPECIFICATIONS 







■0*0 Whffl' k:i vm 



S3i ^^*' --" iL ( - ^ 



OfT'VIHC. CA»« 




W/ 



3fW 
Iti.iwt 



-c'-rcrcsm) 



SPECIFICATIONS AND/OR DIMENSIONS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. 



VIBRATING SCREEN: 

4' x 8' 2-0eck high frequency with variable speed control. Adjustable 

sccsntrics provide maximum screening efficiency in multiple 

applications. 

SCREEN SPRINGS: Rubber shear springs enable screen to function 

vigorously at any angle. 

CHUTEySUPPORTS: Chute Support frame complete with a B'-O" 
(1.82m) long top and 3' -0" (914m) long bottom chute plus a fines 
collecting hopper. 

HOPPER/BELT FEEDER: 

SELF-RELIEVING HOPPER: Reduces material bridging and increases 
material flow with long, steep side walls. Hopper capacity of 9 cu. 
yd. heaped, and heavy Vi" (6.35mm) plate steel construction and 
telescopic support legs for increased stability. 

SLOPED GRIZZLY DUMP: Hydraulic activated cy'inders and heavy duty 

5V2" (139.7mm) clear opening grizzly 

BELT FEEDER: Heavy-dury 9' • 6" (2.39m) long roller belt design with 

variable speed hydraulic dnve for precise material metering. 

SHREDDER CAPABILITIES: 

THE SHREDDER: A 'Tine" type shredder is included and designed 

for use in top soil and related applications. 

SHREDDER HOUSING: Hydraulicalry slides 'Tjpen" and "closed" for 
inspection and operation. 

UNIQUE INTERCHANGEA3IUTY: A "Mill" design shredder is available 

for interchangeability or can be supolied in lieu of the standard "soil 

tiller." 

POWER ANO DRIVE SYSTEM: 

POWER UNIT: A water ceded diesel produces 58 HP and is equipped 

with ail instrumentation, electric start, battery. 45 gallon lockable fuel 

tank, and "high temperaturelcw oil" shut-down system. 



DRIVES: All hydraulic with instrumentation and controls conveniently 
mounted at ground level to operate the main belt, screen, screen pitch, 
belt feeder, shredder, grizzly dump and conveyor lift t CO gallon lockable 
Hydraulic Reservoir is also included. 

AMPLE POWER: The dieseiyhydraulic power unit is designed to operate 
two additional "off-olanr conveyors. (Conveyors not included). 

HEAVY-DUTY CHASSIS/UNDERCARRIAGE: 
TRUCK TYPE CHASSIS: Designed for dependable legal highway por- 
tability featuring a single axle with dual wheels, a king pin towing at- 
tachment, air brakes and a two speed landing gear. 
UNDERCARRIAGE MEMBERS: Telescopic tubular design with hydraulic 
lift to elevate the conveyor to a maximum 22 degree operating incline, 
maximizing load-out height. 

BASIC CONVEYOR: 

CONVEYOR: 30" (762mm) wide x 40' (12.92m) long rigidly formed 

steel construction designed to handle a variety of material under tough 

load conditions. The conveyor frame also has a rimge design for lower 

travel dimensions. 

CONVEYOR COMPONENTS: 

HEAD PULLEY: Rubber lagged. 

TAIL PULLEY: SeH cleaning wing. 

TROUGHING IDLERS: are 35 degree CEMA 8 type spaced on 

4' -0"( 1.2 1m) centers. 

RETURN IDLERS: are spaced on 1Q/0" (3.043m) centers. 
TAKE-UP: are heavy-duty screw type with protective rod covers. 
BELT CLEANER: positive cleaning with spring tensions. 
PAINT: Standard enamel Portec beige 

HIGHLY MOBILE TRAVEL: Width = 8' - 6' (2.590m) 
Height = 13* - 5" (4.114m) Weight = 22,000 lbs. (Approx.) 



These well balanced machines can be moved quickly and easily. 

STANDARD OPTIONS: 

• REMOTE CONTROL GRIZZLY DUMP • WET SCREEN WITH SPRAY BARS 
COMPOSITE HOPPER LINERS • "AR" STEEL UNERS • FEED HOPPER WINGS 







Accuse mvKab*^ iwv <&» « l» 

-04J03 >r J** J^OT*. JTOUwOT *^"*J«-4 n »wiwK4b*^ -*3y 

>oduci n i»«i»cKa»««o *• wi—3 u *• m*. w * ■> *% 

<q» t» rt nw 4» is jjuc» <iw4 ••• 



pNMgr^v 7* « produce *rtcn mat 'v** Been rcBwiaaore >&<*«: 'csaor r ftJn jIih»w»tmp< «wfl3«j J * v r *xin 

"a nacatuiy m k Aisratcci acrcn uu con- *r mc «m». iai«n« frotoptft**. jum^t »»v Mv» seen 

* cftangc <«t)>swi neoco. "* -j*k oi j-< not M maot tt "in «* >*« utmf^t m »<•» noma 

mi r t v tt. PonruYoAcrg oocs xi -mi j« 9 « o*on d oyari a— « won* J* «* «nd 2>m j-_m -o «f*cn Tn 

n, leanarcez. njtcs. -.axure o> mwj» ««u * *• 3ep*c»en. «<« i -oav-v m « j «j i*m*n v*nna 

-wrn. f«c COTOtianac wcfl Ti—a a**d+* And ucj*. * n*i< ^ tf $ mji ■!■ W « M «v«ra*>^ If* srvejuce. 



attentitMtRrim rrg gone** "JwM 
>^3uncm « juar« an* owor an rsuanw* 
« out » atn aud» -.mum »• i"*» « •> * zrr 



%" PORTEC" 

~ Construction Equipment Division 

KOLBERG PRODUCTS 



PTI PO* 7?o • ynuxmu cntrru 



03/29/95 14:14 ©219 836 2838 



SEVENSON MIDWEST 



(2)005 




CONVEYORS 



24^AND~3Q^ -BEEFWIffFHS 



30 ? TO"60^-BEL"rLENaTHS 



' ■ ■ 




M ;_ 




H — -■ — 


''-" 


/ 


'.■';•'• 


I /:- / ' 




■ 






.FRAME: 

6" or 8' Jig welded Channel frame. 
(Depending on conveyor size.) 

BELT TAKE-UP: 

Screw type with protective rod covers. 

RECEIVJNG TROUGH: 

6 ft. long material receiving trough with 
damped rubber flashing and radial receiving 
hopper. 

■DRIVE: 

Direct coupled hydraulic gercier type motor 

TAIL PULLEY: 

Self-cleaning wing type. 



UNDERCARRIAGE: 

Telescoping pin lock design. 

TRQUGHING IDLERS: 

CEMA Class 3 tyoe. sealed-for-life ball bear- 
ings, 3 roll 35 degree, 5" diameter steel on 
4' centers. 

CONVEYOR BELTING: 

160 P1W with 1/8" top x 1/16" bottom covers 

includes 'as:eners for mechanical splice. NOT 

INSTALLED. 

HEAO PULLEY: 

Rubber lagged. 



RETURN IDLERS: 

Steel roll return idlers placed on 10' -0" 
centers. 

PAINTING: 

Primed with coat of iron oxide and a finish 
coat of enamel. 

ANCHOR PIVOT AND PLATE. 

Base plate, center pin and nmge assembly. 

(Optional) 

AXLE/TOWING ASSEMBLY: 

Single axle with 3.00 :< 17.5, 10 ply truck type 
tires, swivel wheels, and a heavy-duty pinUe 
type hc.ch assembly. 



PORTEC 

Construction Equipment Division 

KOLBERG PRODUCTS 




904. W. 23PO SWEET • RO BOX ZZO 'YANKTON. SOUTH DAKOTA 57079 
TELEPHONE. 505-665-8771 • FAX: 605-665-3353 



ftMQMM ^n«f Kjt»— •( -»•? *'t n e in Jiv<*» -«• KUrMviC :tC*« :ru:9QOC<i; * M MM* •!..»:»• man !Um* **.*. 


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?vi y» -*c Aicr. hi -m*t» r*ningrqp«s, ;*j(4i >i*»i i mmt i«**" >y»<»^i >w Phraw* ».«!■■« *»f **? co-pe*** 


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'."oua roiu-v^*-*-* 1 ^ ;J SwiOi <•*--■ <«i-«. — # t^^oi ao-<u*OC "jtct.fc.ti. ^ yu«6| j/"* **<• SW <**<«»** 


;ocu^i ii S'^'oor-? an :-*Cca -* tiw ^^cons n >c ;uo*c« • *..„••»». ^ww**, u- «j *mt ■•« «arr«ai ■ 


4 *!•« icoo»— — - .5~*» «• **•* j<*« 'I*, mm h* -«<«-» •*>* t»»?c«a **. At', a -.jcv j«"#t >*«-*• W *^JO* *r :^* ***» 


OKam**-* »» aneuctz nc«t *<•* »4>-.^ ujicTfxij jji->« .ocov. >j.<w<«. ..**. * ,t*Asras v«iw •-. i ."-*- 


of l*C Aisi'w-*"** •«•»* I fe«3u*rej j»*j.»***«t >jn-w*% • jr^a ;o« wig *">■ v.t.<y -jr>*«c?: ^*o**d V .•«*.»»■* *^ 


EMffS. *C!w4*^ U^HA jnfl MSMA. .v^-.a^ -ji-t ,. 30<>w4«*r. cttCftiCll «m«*t. .«*. 5u«t|*miis* «IK rftc^C *.:ii«'»% •*•« 


'M ^ifa», .i-w— . JOC^W'»«. 5-'-'» *— ' ••""J if«e sncjcs. 



Copyr.cihi 



1992 Ponec, inc. n/92 



« 



FIATURIS 
iow-f nenu rami 

• Fi'U in bgttt >HMt. 

• QtMft or tnde»e4 
construction. 

• Mild st«i witft primer 

<W Spttlll C«t!fVflt V 

sulnlut steel. 

BOtTUUGS 

• Put. Miy tali 
nimwairrieleeeinefll 

VDICANU1D. 1" WW* 
VAPfMOt IDGC KIT 

tecwacy 

• Fiminett* loatagt and 
jkirtboerde 

HlAVT-OUTY, 
STU4OAR0 (OftVrfOt 
COWONWTS 

• iviJion neatly 

3 BUT WIDTHS (If. 
ja~. 10 T I J BUT 
SPtiDRANOB 

• For capicitw* •( 1.630 
'.9 400.000 tbs./hr. 

WCIOSIO STtJHC- 

IQAOtO SOHW 
TaU-UF- « 

AUTOMATIC TWIMIHO 
OMXnVXNBUT 

• Mlmmiw nwd Iw 
truning ind urulon 

l4|USUBU1tS 

UNIQUE Z-1DLOL 
FUU-UOATTOG 
WUON PUTTCIUW 

• Ho pcroti 

• ?4-lnth ««igrupa<i 

• Un«^'i4!U<3 manuring 
pridtiin 

provw totauxex 

• rrS AUTO ZEJtO 
«*4 AUTO »AN 
FUNCTIONS 

• Fill. Jtmglt. amis* 
uubratlOft 

optional 
oiwtai sat point 
contiouul 
iqao-out/iatch 

CONTNOUtt. end 

MCOtOATWN 

SYSHMS 



ADt>m\/e: f=fee2>era- 



INTERMEDIATE CAPACITY 

WEIGHBELT FEEDER 

For "Tough" Industrial Processes 



\w MODEL 1130 
i, TOTALIZER 




NOW... A Rugged, Compact, 
Reliable, Accurate and Cost-Effective 
Weighbelt Feeder. 

The RIEOE Model WBF-IC (Intermediate capacity) 
weighbett leader, combined wrth the RIEOE Modal 
1130 totalizer, provide an accurate, reliable and 
cost-affective solution to a wide variety of welgh- 
fecding needs 

Measuring accuracy, unequalled In the industry, is 
the result of the unique two-idler, lull-floating weigh 
platform and a direct-coupled digital belt speed 
sensor. The weight and speed signals are combined In 
the RIEOE Model 1130 totalizer to provide useful 
displays and outputs ot rate (Ibs/min.) and totalized 
weight (lbs.. Kg or tons). An optional, digital set-point 
controller provides automatic control of a preteedef 
and/or the WBF-IC bait speed. 

Trie compact design and construction ot the 
WBF-IC permits Installation in "tigM" spaces. 



Primary Input Feeder to Food 
Processing Unas 
Saasontng/Addltlve Proportioning 
In Food Processes 
Cement Proportioning In 
"C.T.B.". ••R.C.C." and Geld 
Ore Heap Leeching Processes 
Limestone Addition in 
'•Heutraluing" Cut Feed 

• Gypsum Proportioning in Cement 
Mingtaeturfng Promt 

• Sludge Feeding in Sewage 
Treatment PUntJ 

• Umt reading in Water Tnatmenl 
Faculties 

• Replacement of Low Capacity/ 
Ught-Outy Gravimetric Belt 
Feeders 



^H 



H*H.iede Systems Inc. 

* -* S37S SUNS6' *CAO WPt.5 MS y.tzi re.^OMS ISIZ) 7J4-S0Z0 S »I i«i?) 7s«-;$k 



03/29/95 14:18 ©219 836 2838 SEVENSON MIDWEST 

JUN t4 '33 IS: I I RIEDE SYS 512 7847S35 



12)007 



PRGE.05 



AH*a. OVOULU. LOtCTX 




MODEL WBMC 



Open CenstrtKtloA Stwwn, 
AJs* AvaitoMt In 
EndoMtf Construct!**.. 



k 

BELT 
«01M 


9 
nwia 

OUOcaro 


c 

OMOUU. 


<r 


30* 


jr 


2< 


jr 


4r 


xf 


«r 


««• 



MOOtt WBF-IC CAPACITY TABU (MAXIMUMS) 



is- 



Z 2*' 



30 



| 3ULX 

oexsity 


SaT SPEED HAXQf S 


1-10 fpm 


5-so hjm 


10-11X1 tp«» 


10P.C. C . 


1.J00fc»/i»r. 


1.000 Krt/V 


Ift.COOibs^r. 


« 


4.000 


23.300 


40.000 


so 


9.0CO 


40.000 


30.000 


too 


14.000 


10 000 


1WCC0 


10 P.C.r. 


2.300 lb*/hr. 


14.000 io«/«r. 


29.000 Its.'hr. 


2S 


7.GC0 


35.000 


ro.cco 


V) 


i«.X0 


70.000 


UO.COO 


!CO 


2J0OO 


140.0CO 


280.CC0 


10 P.C f 


4.000 ibi/rv. 


20.000 Itti/V . 


40.ooo Iss/ftr. 


25 


10.0C0 


S4.000 


100,000 


50 


20.000 


icc.oca 
zoo 000 


200,000 


100 


' 40 000 


4C0 0CO 



ALSO FROM RtlDf SYSTEMS 



SIMGLE-IOLIA AHQ MULTI-IDLER 
IELT SCALE SYSTEMS 




WIDER. LONGER. HIGH?* CAPACITY 
WQ9H8EU fESOER SYSTEMS 




IH> 



spfananoNS 

FfUMC 

• Formed steel channel. Cosseted with T%" dia. 
pipe spreaders 

• Baited legs for last bell removal ant replacement 
HEAD PULLEY 

• 5" dimeter, crownjd. lagged and rraenined 

• Taser-lok ivjbj and i'i* dia snatt 
TAiL PUUET 

• 5" diameter, crowned, with snciosec 
spring- loaded screw Uke-ug 

CARRY SOILS 

• 4" aiamettr with sealed (or lite searings 
RETURN AOU 

• Pivo'ed witn unique celt-tracking feature 
5ELTING 

• VufcaniKO. enotess or mechanical clips with 
uomqn "rllGOtN S?UC6" 

• t " vulcanized vsnnef edge 
DRIVE 

• Hollow-bore. C-Iact wilh integral d.c. cotor ot 
requisite capacity (0 5 to 3.0 M.P.) 

CONTROL 

• 5 C.R. Type with, local operator: station and 
current follower 

TOTAUIER 

• Rtede ModcJ 1130 wltn microprocessor-oned 
automatic calibration circuit 

[tw«r i* •'. ( ix '•» MiHia i mH O M 

Rapreserrtod 8y: 



« 







fliBde Systems Inc. 

o"' :^ , <i»f m»»i »» , .'> m« suji if i maul itw ruudm .-»i »«,», r>*.-»r> 



** TOTftL PAGE. 35 ** 



03/29/95 14:17 ©219 836 2838 



SEVENSON MIDWEST 



12)008 



• 



SOIL WE1GHBELT SYSTEM SPECIFICATION 

Weighing System - Riede Model W8F-1C 
Supplier - Riede System, Inc., Minneapolis, MN 



ITEM 

Material Handled 

Density 

Feed Rate 

Maximum 
Minimum 

Operating Time 

Operating Duty 

Belt Width 
Belt Speed 
Belt Drive 
Transportability 
Signal Output 



DESCRIPTION 



Soil 



110 lbs/cubic ft. 



60 tons/hour (1 00 tons/hr w/modification) 
15 tons/hour 

up to 2-12 hour shifts/day 

Continuous, except for specified PM 
scheduling 

30 inch 

100 feet/minute 

2 HP D.C., variable speed Motor 

Trailer or skid mounted 

Dry Chemical Feeder System 
Automated valves for liquids (optional) 
4-20 mA DC, isolated 



/ / I L 



PORTABIiEitiitd^TATIQNARy 




COLD MIX ASPHALT ~# SOIL -CEMENT STABILIZED BASE 

CRUSHED STONE STABILIZED BASE • SOILREMEDIATION 

^SLUDGE STABILIZATION ©MINING AGGLOMERATION" 




PUGMILL PLANTS WITH FLEXIBILITY! 




'< 



< 






THE CHAMBER 




SERIES 50 PUGMILL 




PRODUCES UP TO 500 TPH 

Mixing Chamber Sizes OOO 4'x6' O 4'x8' O 4'xlO' 



l< 



<c be-; 3e-es 5C : .cm 









ZrzC^CS 'JO 'O OCC - ■ 

i ~ < nq c'n.ambe' p- 
ec ; c aopi'ca'.c- z' 

. -es ' ! !u'5trc - ea ce , .'. 
3>"C"ronized p- a~ 

■re r a 1 spillage, cc-"-; 
. se' . ;ce access. 



cece'-ce"' jpo^: mare' a characteristics. 
-e 3uaiiry of mix -eq^^ea. Contac you' 
'ec j.'eme n * neeas. 



e series oC 



i? =, n> 



»r$: neavy-Pu' 



S:-c- - s mounred ir an a-erlapoed spiral 
» r iai "acn gcte" 'o enncnce mix qycii'y, 
aus' and p'ovide coera'cr safety as -ve:! 



Reversible Paddles 



-re stc-aarp in Ni- 
• s - ee c - -e' -c^e'ia's are 

2! ca - z~ T-e cccic'es are 
- pes ■ ons ;r --e shef's 
zn ri^e and r^:'3ve mix- 
ceasif-p ^ea.- re. 




Dribble Gate 




Drop-Out Bottom 

- ra-card <Ol3ERG ^ear'jre. the drop-out bot- 
■.;m orc/irjes "or ease or cean-out and pac- 
3 e '>c ~ a>r re "a nee. 




Bearings and Seals 

3oucie 'cile' bearings and compressed rubber 

~>a'er c' seals ; or decreased maintenance 

c^c;e' service life and a tignt seal around the 




Radial Liners 

3::a a / : cr~ec rec ocecoie s - eel line's 
— - r- ;e — a - e' ai buiia-jp one -ecuce clean- 




Receiving Hood/Spray Bars 

r ~e 'ece / ~a -ocd alec's mce' al evenly "o 
• -.j — , -- ; - ar , =9r ^ srandcra sorcy system 
" ~e *ece ■ "a n occ introduces liquid ad- 
z ■ ,es •; - -e -eed ma - eriais. 



. 



c 



c 



PORTABLE PUCMILL PLANTS 

DESIGNED TO MEET YOUR REQUIREMENTS 



Model 51 and 52 Basic Specifications 

CONVEYOR: 30" (762mm) X 28' - 0" (8.53m) pulley centers • 
Rubber lagged head pulley • Self-cleaning wing tail pulley • Screw 
take-up witfi protective rod covers • 5" ( 1 27mm) diameter CEMA "B" 
troughing and return idlers • Single blade, spring tensioned belt 
cleaner mounted under the heed pulley. 

PUGMILL 4' x 6' (1.22m x 1.33m) or 4' x 8' (1.22m x 2.44m) 
Kolberg Series 50. 

WATER SYSTEM: Spray bar mounted in the pugmill receiving hood to 
include lines to grade, (pump, meter, valves optional) 

OPERATORS PLATFORM: Located along side of pugmill with double 
outside handrail, toe plate and "gripstruf" decking. 

CHASSIS: Channel frame transport truck with gooseneck and king pin 
• Square tube beam axle • Dual 1 1 :00 x 22.5, 1 2 ply tires • Air 
brakes • Lift jacks. 

HOPPER AND FEEDER: 

MODEL 51: 14 cu. yd. (10.71 cm.) gravity feed hopper • 12'-0" 
(3.65m) long x 9' - 6" (2.90m) wide top opening • Receiving trough 
with •cperedopening and rubber flashing • Adjustable material gate. 

^fc,ODEL52: 9 cu. yd. (6 83 cm.) belt feeder hopper • 1 2' - 0" 
^^3. 65m) long x 6' - 6" (1 .98m| wide top opening • 30" (762mm) x 
8' (2.44m) roller belt feeder with variable speed drive. 

VANE FEEDER: Optional with 1 -1/2 cu. yd (1 .1 5 cm.) hopper. 

SECONDARY FEEDER/HOPPER: Optional with 6 cu. yd. (4.6 cm.) 
hopper and 30" (762mm) x 3' (2.44m) roller belt feeder (Model 52 
only!. 




MODEL 51 




MODEL 52 




WITH SECONDARY 
FEEDER HOPPER 



WITH VANE FEEDER 



Model 53 Basic Specifications 

FEED CONVEYOR: 30" (762mm) X 1 3' - 0" (3.96m) Pulley Centers, 

varicble speed drive. 

DISCHARGE CONVEYOR: 30' (762mm) x 28' - 0" (8.53m) Pulley 

Centers. 

PULLEYS: Rubber lagged head and self-cleaning wing tail. 

TAKE-UPS: Screw type with protective rod covers. 

IDLERS: 5" (1 27mm) diameter CEMA "B" troughing and return. 

BELT CLEANER: Single blade spring tensioned under head pulley. 

PUGMILL 4' x 6' ( 1 .22m x 1 32), 4' x 8' ( 1 .22 x 2.44m) or 4' x 1 0' 

(1 22m x 3.04m) Kolberg Series 50. 

HOPPER: 5 cu. yd. (3.82 cm.) gravity feed • 9' - 0" (2.74m) long x 

7' - 5" (2.28m) wide top opening • Receiving trough with tapered 

opening and rubber flashing. 



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MODEL 53 







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OPERATORS PLATFORM: Same Specifications as Model 51 and 52. 
CHASSIS: Same Specifications as Model 51 and 52. 
WATER SYSTEM: Same Specifications as Model 51 and 52. 



STANDARD PLANT DESIGNS SHOWN ABOVE ARE WITH DIESEL/HYDRAULIC POWER. 
ELECTRIC/HYDRAULIC, DIESEL/ELECTRIC OR ALL ELECTRIC POWER ARE AVAILABLE AS OPTIONS. 
FOR GREATER FLEXIBILITY KOLBERG OFFERS OPTIONAL DESIGNS 
IN BOTH PORTABLE OR STATIONARY MODELS. 



DIMENSIONS AND OR SPECIFICATIONS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANCE WITHOUT NOTICE. 
CONTACT FACTORY FOR CERTIFIED DRAWINGS, AND DETAILED SPECIFICATIONS. 



JX 



OFFERS MORE FLEXIBILITY! 




An On-Plant Yane Feeder 



Optic- s available : cr rhe int-sducfion of dry additives 
into the "nire'ic! on the conveyor belt. A material plow 
is usee "o embed f ne addit^e into the material. 



Liquid Additives 

Sucn as wa;e r asphalt or cnemicals can be introduced into the Pugmill receiv- 
ing hoed with the pump and meter options. K0L5ERG offers systems that are 
encmeered tor soecific aoolications and cdaitives. 





A Dozer/Trap Belt Feeder 

Is moused on this portable pugmill plant. This option may be 
used -vnen marer cis can be ted directly from their source. 



Kolberg Dry Additive Silos 

--e o"e r ei ir stationer/ skid mount and fully 
cortcbie seif-e'ectmg oesigns. The silos can feed 
— 'ate<":c s "a tie 3, jgm olant by screw augers or 
.one -eeaers. r hese s;ics are utilized with 
OlBEPG PugmJils m z -criety of applications. 




Easy Conversion To Screen Plant 

Many <Ol3E2G Pugmill plants are easily converted to 
sceening plcnrs, enhancing their versatility and 
ooerating capacities. 



OTHER OPTIONS AVAILABLE TO MATCH YOUR REQUIREMENTS. 



Sec at.;* *)f*iw <* : ~.— ~ - iv .-:- 


s :«'/;'. r z .:eraiL.re, 'taid orotocjraons o* is product* <*nc^ f>av ">a*e oe»»n 


■?<;-iaiions s -r.ti esoo'-s<cintv ot 'na ..ser and *H 3e deoencent ^oon :r>e area and ne j« io «*icn trie produd 4 


mod'-*:':, "a .■*«-"-: Z'~*~..": 


■" snec ?•. =r-ac <oice'g -nay -^ot -*ecassan*y 5e 13 'Ifcjstrated -nerein aiso ~,on- 


*l* ;v Tie user 'n sor~e arotograons. jua'is "nay -ave o*<" »'* , cved 'cr illustrative ouracses only. Th& equipfne** 


tmoc.*. :e-.-i;- I'ly-.*,*, ~M«r. ■ 


-cessa/. - s jsec ' cai'ana oe surged to cflarcje *»thout tot>ce ah iaies d !h« 


if ;u'C -ot oe mewled «<''oiJ ail guards ar acred n -neir r>orr-ai xswon ^ac*m»nt gi ^ Lards and otrer satary equip*"** 


proCuC'S .* ^f- ■■'.'- t-*—. i'f ' .' 


-<;: *-• :■?. Sions o» ts standard "afrarry, PornoKoiOercj does not warrant jr 


s ?r*en ^ecer-cent uccn n e irea and :^e >sa '0 *»n.c" :n« S'oc.c: s out * sa'^»y study snoutf ae -nade Dy '"• user 


reorese'" "Jl ", _•'" l\jC.i "*•■« «T 


*defai ;*:* :< ecu statues, codes. or en nance*, rules, standards or jiner -aqua- 


;i -(» jcoi>ca>on an 3 1 acuired additional guards, warn. re, signs and jtrer safety devices sroud 3e <nsalied 5y 


iors -ciijtpq \ r .'~ A i"fl uS-i 


;jv-r r»cj u • ■ ;c".;-on aicctrical wring, etc Compliance «ittl these >taiu!es wc 


—a -s«*r ^rerever icons' ate. -e'ere joe'atmq -re orocucs. 



m PORTEC 



Coovc- 



Construct/on Equipment OMston 

KOLBERG PRODUCTS 

'00 W 2tsf 5treet ■ P 0. 3c* 20 
Yankton. Soutn OaHota 57079 
Phono: ;605) 565-3771 
-AX (605) 56S-38S0 



4.0 Miscellaneous 



4.1 Crew Requirements 

All personal entering and working on this project shall have completed the OSHA approved 
40 HR. Safety Course in accordance with the approved Site Specific Health and Safety Plan. The 
personnel responsible to operate the mechanical equipment on this project shall have the proper 
experience required to run the equipment in a safe and efficient manner. If a crane requiring a 
special license is to be utilized on this project then a crane operator licensed in the State of 
Georgia will operate this equipment. 



4.2 Equipment Storage and Security 

The entire work area and staging area for this project is secured by permanent fencing. The 
need for additional or offsite storage is not required due to the sufficient area available on site and 
that the equipment will be put to use or in its permanent position upon arrival. Once the 
equipment is no longer required for use on this project it will be demobilized off of the site. 



4.3 Equipment Permitting Requirements 

All equipment delivered to this project will meet the requirements of all States which the 
transporting vehicle must travel through. Such special or standard permits which Sevenson will 
consider and acquire as necessary are: 

1) Over dimensional State permits 

2) Gross Vehicle Weight permits 

3) Permanent or Temporary Fuel permits 

4) Permanent or Temporary IRP Trip Registration permits 



J 



4.4 Equipment Safety 

All Equipment to be utilized on this project will be done so in accordance with Sevenson's 
Corporate Health and Safety Plan which is included with the approved Site Specific Health and 
Safety Plan. The following appropriate sections of these plans which apply to operating 
equipment for this project are as follows and attached: 

Section Q - General Safety Rules For Employees, Items 1-40 

Section U - Safety Inspection Checklist, Items 1 - 4,16,18,22 



Q. GENERAL SAFETY RULES FOR EMPLOYEES 

The following rules are to be adhered to while in our employ: 

1. ACCIDENTS OR INJURIES, no matter how minor, must be reported to the 
foreman or superintendent for immediate treatment or first aid to prevent 
infection or complication. 

2. JOB CLEANLINESS (housekeeping) will be practiced on all construction 
projects. Excess material not needed on present operations will be stockpiled 
or stacked until needed. Form and scrap lumber with protruding nails, and all 
other debris, will be kept cleared from work areas, passageways and stairs, in 

and around buildings or other structures, will not be allowed to accumulate and 

will be removed at regular intervals. Removal of debris will follow a prescribed 
(designated) procedure. 

3. PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT will be provided and used by workers 
where potential hazards exist. This includes lifelines where a danger of falling 
exists, respiratory equipment in a dangerous atmosphere, and safety glasses, 
goggles or face shields on all concrete breaking, metal chipping, welding or 
other operations where there is exposure to flying objects or anything injurious 
to the eyes. 

4. FOOT PROTECTION - shoes that are workwise and in serviceable condition for 
the operation to which the employee is assigned are required. Check with 
superintendent or foreman as to the proper foot protection requirement for the 
assigned work. 

5. BE ALERT when handling rough edges or abrasive material, when the work 
subjects hands to lacerations, puncturing, or burns. Special hand protection 
may be designated by the job superintendent or foreman. 

6. CLOTHING will be appropriate to duties being performed and will not include 
torn or loose articles. 

7. HAND TOOLS will not be used for any other purpose than that intended. Hand 
tools provided by either employer or employee that are damaged or worn will 
be promptly repaired or replaced. 

8. POWER TOOLS will be operated only by authorized personnel, in accordance 
with manufacturers' instructions, and if electrical, will be grounded. All safety 
equipment provided will be tested, kept in good repair and used. 



• 



9. CONSIDER all wires "live" until checked and locked out. Keep safe distance 
from "live" electricity. 



10. DO NOT use electrical power equipment while standing in water. 

1 1 . ALL MACHINE GUARDS will be kept in place while machinery is in operation. 
Tampering with machine guards is prohibited, and any removal requires the 
prior approval of a responsible supervisor. All guards are to be promptly 
replaced after the repair work that necessitated their removal has been 
completed. 

■12.- COMPRESSED GAS CYLINDERS will be -chained or otherwise-secured in-ari-- 
upright position, and will be placed in cylinder carts whenever being transported 
to different locations on the project. Empty cylinders will be removed from the 
project. 

1 3. COMPRESSED'GAS OR AIR is not to be used for dusting off clothes or cleaning 
equipment. Never point an air hose at anyone, extremely dangerous . 

14. SOURCES OF IGNITION wiil be prohibited from areas where flammable liquids 
or explosives are stored or issued, and appropriate warning signs will be posted 
at these locations. "NO SMOKING" rules must be observed in posted areas. 

15. INTOXICATING BEVERAGES and non-prescribed drugs, possession or use 
during working hours, is strictly forbidden, or whenever such use directly 
affects job performance. 

1 6. TAMPERING WITH or unauthorized removal of fire extinguishers from assigned 
locations is prohibited. 

17. PARTIALLY USED OR USED fire extinguishers will be reported to foreman or 
superintendent. 

18. FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS will be contained in approved metal safety cans. 

19. KEEP SALAMANDERS or other portable (temporary) heating devices away from 

combustible materials. 

20. KNOW THE LOCATION and use of fire extinguishing equipment and how to give 
fire alarm. 

21 . NO EMPLOYEE other than the operator will ride on any trucks, loaders, shovels, 
or other moving equipment unless specifically authorized to do so. 



22. NO EMPLOYEE will operate any machinery, equipment or tool unless he has 
been properly instructed in its use and is thoroughly familiar with all details of 
its operation. 

23. BE AWARE of work going on around you. Keep clear of suspended loads and 
traffic areas. Work with care and good judgment at all times. 

24. ALL SWITCHES or drives on machinery will be shut down before cleaning, 
greasing, oiling, or making adjustments or repairs. 

25. EXCAVATION AND TRENCH CONSTRUCTION - Employees will no work in 
. areas where there is a danger of slides or cave-ins. Excavations will be braced 

.. .and trenches sloped to an angle to relieve danger of cave-ins of the material _. 
being excavated. 

26. PLACE EXCAVATION SPOIL far enough away, a minimum of two feet from the 
edge, to avoidJoad strain on walls. Remove surface rocks that may fall in. 

27. DO NOT permit vehicles too close to edge of cut. 

28. WELDING AND BURNING OPERATIONS will be carried on only be authorized 
personnel with appropriate individual protective equipment. A perimit from the 
RAF3 Fire Department is required before welding or burning operations can 
proceed. 

29. FLOOR AND WALL OPENINGS will be covered; if covers are removed for 
working purposes, then railings and toe boards must be utilized. 

30. NO EMPLOYEE will work on scaffolding higher than ten feet above the ground 
or floor without proper guard rails, toe boards and proper flooring, except when 
proper precautions, such as lifelines with harnesses, barricades, etc., have 
otherwise been taken. 

31. NO EMPLOYEE will work on scaffolding four to ten feet in height having a 
minimal horizontal dimension in either direction of less than 45 inches without 
standing guardrail installed on all open sides and ends of the platform. 

32. UNSTABLE OBJECTS such as barrels, boxes, loose bricks or concrete block will 
not be used to support scaffolding or planks. 

33. KEEP ALL TOOLS and materials away from the edge of scaffolds, platforms, 
shaft openings, etc. 



34. NO EMPLOYEE will work above protruding reinforcing steel unless it has been 
protected to eliminate the possibility of impalement. Equipment used in placing 
concrete will be safe, and employees using it will follow proper safety 
procedures. 

35. HORSEPLAY :OR PRACTICAL JOKES will not be permitted or tolerated on the 
jobsite before, during and after working hours. 

36. AVOID SHORTCUTS - Use designated walkways, ramps, stairs, ladders, etc. 

37. WHEN ENTERING different work areas, familiarize yourself with any required 
safety precautions. 



38. KEEP YOUR MIND on your job - and temper under control ... alwavs ! 

39. ALL POSTED SAFETY RULES will be obeyed and will not be removed except by 
management's authorization. Violation of these safety rules may be cause for 
immediateldismissal of any employee. 

40. SUPERINTENDENTS AND FOREMAN will enforce all safety rules, instruct men 
in performing duties in a safe manner, put men to work only when sure that no 
dangerous conditions exist; instruct new men on safety rules. 



U. SAFETY INSPECTION CHECKLIST 
1. AIR TOOLS 

a - Pneumatic power tools will be secured to the hose in a positive manner to 

prevent accidental disconnection. 

b- Safety clips or retainers will be securely installed and maintained on 

pneumatic impact tools to prevent them from being accidentally expelled. 

c The manufacturer's safe operating pressure for all fittings will not be 

exceeded. 



2. COMPRESSED AIR, USE OF 

a- Compressed air used for cleaning purposes will not exceed 30 psi and will 

be used with effective chip guarding and personal protective equipment. 

b. This requirement does not apply to concrete form, mill scale, and similar 

cleaningjoperations. 



COMPRESSED GAS CYLINDERS 

a. Valve protection caps will be in place when compressed gas cylinders are 
transported, moved, or stored. 

b. Cylinder valves will be closed when work is finished and when cylinders are 
empty or are moved. 

c. Compressed gas cylinders will be secured in an upright position at all times, 
except when cylinders are actually being hoisted or carried. 

d. Cylinders will be kept at safe distance or shielded from welding or cutting 
operations. Cylinders will not be placed where they can contact an 
electrical circuit. 

e. Oxygen and fuel gas regulators will be in proper working order whiie in use. 



( 



Oxygen and fuel gas cylinders will be stored separately. Minimum distance 
of 20 feet. 



CRANES AND DERRICKS 

a. The employer will comply with the manufacturer's specifications and 
limitations. 

b. Rated load capacities, recommended operating speeds, and special hazard 
warnings or instructions will be posted on all equipment and visible from 
the operator's station. 

c. Equipment will be inspected. before each use and all deficiencies corrected 
before further use. 

d. Accessible areas within the swing radius of the revolving superstructure will 
be barricaded. 

e. Except where electrical distribution and transmission lines have been de- 
energized and visibly grounded at point of work, or where insulating barriers 
not a pare of or an attachment to the equipment or machinery have been 
erected to prevent physical contact with the lines, no part of a crane or its 
load will be operated within 10 feet of a line rated 50 kV or below, for 
lines rated over 50 kV, the minimum clearance is 10 feet + 0.4 inches for 
each kV over 50, or twice the length of the line insulator, but never less 
than 10 feet. 



t 



18. HOISTS, MATERIAL AND PERSONAL 

a. The employer will comply with the manufacture's specifications and 

limitations. 

b. Rated load capacities, recommended operating speeds, and special hazards 

warnings o.r instructions will be posted on cars and platforms. 

c. Hoistwayentrances will be protected by substantial gates or bars. 

d. Hoistway doors or gates will be not less than six feet six inches high and 

will be provided with mechanical locks which cannot be operated from the 
landing side, and will be accessible only to persons on the car. 

e. Overhead protective coverings will be provide on the top of the hoist cage 

or platform. 



22. MOTOR VEHICLES AND MECHANIZED EQUIPMENT 

a. Motor vehicles covered are those vehicles that operate within an off- 
highway jobsite, not open to public traffic, all vehicles will have a service 
brake system, and a parking brake system. All vehicles in use will be 
checked at the beginning of each shift to assure that all parts, equipment, 
and accessories affecting safe operation are free from defects and in safe 
operating condition. 

b. No employer will use any motor vehicle'equipment having an obstructed 

view of the rear unless: • 

the vehicle has a reverse signal alarm audible above the surrounding noise 

level-or- 

the vehicle is backed up only when an observer signals that it is safe to do 

so. 

Bulldozer and scraper blades, endloader buckets, dump bodies, and similar 
equipment will be either fully towered or blocked when being repaired or 
when not in use. All controls will be in neutral position with the motors 
stopped and brakes set, unless work being done requires otherwise. 
Whenever the equipment is parked, the parking brake wiil be set. 
Equipment parked on inclines will have the wheels chocked and the parking 
brake set. 



• 



• 



• 



* 



SEVENSON ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES, INC. 

QUALITY ASSURANCE PROJECT PLAN (QAPjP) 

for the 

MASSACHUSETTS MILITARY RESERVATION 
BARNSTABLE COUNTY, MASSACHUSETTS 



Approved and Accepted By: 



Site Supervisor (Sevenson) Project Officer (NGB) 



QA/QC Officer (Sevenson) Subcontract Lab QA Officer 



c 



( 






<§> 



n 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 
SECTION 

1.0 PROJECT DESCRIPTION 

1.1 Site History Background Information 

1.2 Project Scope and Objective 

1.3 Sample Network Design and Rationale 

1.4 Parameters to be Tested and Frequency 

1.5 Data Quality Objectives (DQO) 

1.6 Project Schedule 

2.0 PROJECT ORGANIZATION AND RESPONSIBILITY 

3.0 QUALITY ASSURANCE OBJECTIVE FOR MEASUREMENT DATA 

3.1 Level of Quality Control Effort 

3.2 Accuracy, Precision and Sensitivity 
of Analysis 

3.3 Completeness, Representativeness and 
Comparability 

4.0 SAMPLING PROCEDURES 

5.0 SAMPLE CUSTODY 

5.1 Field Specific Custody Procedures 

5.1.1 Field Procedures 

5.1.2 Field Logbooks/Documentation 

5.1.3 Transfer of Custody and Shipment Procedures 

5.2 Final Evidence File Custody Procedure 

6.0 CALIBRATION PROCEDURES AND FREQUENCY 

6.1 Field Instruments/Equipment 

6.2 Calibration Check and Procedures 

6.3 General Laboratory Practices 

7.0 ANALYTICAL PROCEDURES 

7.1 Laboratory Analysis 

7.2 Field Screening Analytical Protocol 

7 . 3 Laboratory Procedures 



* 



•> 



<b 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

(Continued) 
SECTION . 



8.0 INTERNAL QUALITY CONTROL CHECKS 

8.1 QA Program 

8.2 Quality Control Checks 



9.0 DATA REDUCTION, VALIDATION, AND REPORTING 

9.1 Field Measurements and Sample Collection 

9.2 Laboratory Services 



10.0 PERFORMANCE AND SYSTEM AUDITS 
11.0 PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE 

11.1 Field Instruments/Equipment 

11.2 Laboratory Instruments 

12.0 SPECIFIC ROUTINE PROCEDURES TO ASSESS 

DATA PRECISION, ACCURACY, AND COMPLETENESS 

12.1 Field Measurements 

12.2 Laboratory Data 

12 . 2 . 1 Precision 

12.2.2 Accuracy 

12.2.3 Completness 

12.2.4 Sensitivity 

13.0 CORRECTIVE ACTIONS 

13.1 Sample Collection/Field Measurement 

13.2 Laboratory Analysis 



14.0 QUALITY ASSURANCE REPORTS TO MANAGEMENT 



Revision: Final 
Date: January 15, 1998 
Section: 1 
Page 1 of 4 



1.0 PROJECT DESCRIPTION 



1.1 SITE HISTORY/BACKGROUND INFORMATION 

The Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR) is located in 
Barnstable County, MA (USEPA Region I) . The initial site 
investigation indicated lead contamination at levels up to 28,850 
ppm total and 208 mg/1 TCLP from active shooting ranges. 
Contaminated range material on site is still in place and has not 
impacted the aquifer. Figure 1 illustrates the location and 
configuration of the site. 



1.2 PROJECT OBJECTIVES AND SCOPE 

The purpose of this QAPjP is to assure the generation of reliable 
and scientifically prudent data of known quality during sampling 
and testing operations while performing the mitigation pursuant 
to the Site Work Plan. On-site processing of the lead impacted 
sand has been selected as the method to treat the range material 
at this site. An estimated 43,000 cubic yards of the lead 
impacted sand is onsite. The actual quantity of berm materials 
requiring MAECTITE® processing will be determined during the 
implementation of the Sampling and Analysis Project Plan. 

Sevenson shall apply the MAECTITE® Treatment Process to 
chemically fixate lead in sand and soil and leave the treated 
material either in-situ (without excavation) or ex-situ 
(excavated, transported to the processing area, and processed) 
based upon the decision tree presented in Figure 3-1 of the 
Sampling and Analysis Project Plan. Samples will be collected 
and analyzed to verify treated material complies with project 
performance specifications. 

Objectives of the QAPjP is to outline and implement the quality 
control and chain-of-custody procedures in accordance with the QA 
2 objective as described in EPA/540/G-90/004 , QA/QC Guidance for 
Removal Activities, April 1990. 

Sevenson shall make sure that the outside subcontracted 
laboratory as well as the onsite laboratory maintain a documented 
Quality Assurance Program that complies with QA 2 objective. All 
sampling and testing procedures shall follow the documented 
Quality Assurance Program plan and this QAPjP. 

1.3 SAMPLE NETWORK DESIGN AND RATIONALE 

The sample network design and rationale for all locations is 
described in the work plan. 



•> 



Revision: Final 
Date: January 15, 1998 
Section: 1 
Page 2 of 4 



TABLE 1 
SAMPLING NETWORK, DESIGN AND RATIONALE 



SAMPLE ID# 


DESIGN/LOCATION 


RATIONALE 


U = Untreated 
UOOl, U002, 
U003. . . 


Lots of hazardous 
range material for 
treatability 
studies on-site 


♦Samples to conduct 
treatability studies 
on-site and optimize 
the MAECTITEb process 


T = Treated 
TOOl, T002, 
T003. . . 


Treated lots 
corresponding to 
treatability study 


♦Determine TCLP-Lead 



1.4 PARAMETERS TO BE TESTED AND FREQUENCY 

Sampling frequency, sample matrices and analytical parameters are 
presented in Table 2. During the course of the work plan 
implementation, soil sampling and testing will be a routine task 
to support the decision making as follows: 



TCLP lead 



one sample per 500 tons of processed material 



5) 



Revision: Final 
Date: January 15, 1998 
Section: 1 
Page 3 of 4 



TABLE 2 



SAMPLE MATRIX 


PARAMETERS 


FREQUENCY 


SAND/SOIL 


TCLP LEAD 


*Every 500 tons 
processed output 



1.5 DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES (POP) 

The development of DQO is based on USEPA documents using a 3- 
stage process: Identify decision types, identify data needs and 
uses, and design a data collection/documentation program. 

The DQO are qualitative and quantitative statements which specify 
the quality of the data required to support decisions made during 
removal activities and are based on the end uses of the data to 
be collected. As such, different data uses may require different 
levels of data quality. There are five analytical levels which 
address various data uses and the QA/QC effort. Sevenson shall 
utilize DQO level 2 for field and laboratory analysis of total 
lead in the mobile laboratory on-site. 

The subcontract laboratory will be required to operate at DQO 
Level 2 for conf irmational testing of (i) treatment verification, 
(ii) treated waste for disposal analysis, and (iii) non-hazardous 
waste material that can be shipped off without treatment. 

The DQO Level 2 provides adequate data quality for this project 
and is sufficient for conformational testing purposes. 

1.6 PROJECT SCHEDULE 

The MMR work plan exhibits the tentative project schedule that is 
in conformance with the requirements of the SOW. This QAPjP 
requires that the approved project schedule is adhered to and any 
deviations from the Schedule for unforeseen circumstances will be 
discussed with the NGB, noted and recorded. 



Revision: Final 
Date: January 15, 1998 
Section: 1 
— Page 4 of 4 

SITE MAP 

& 

PROJECT SCHEDULE 

PLEASE SEE APPENDIX 



*) 



Revision: Final 
Date: January 15, 1998 
Section: 2 
Page 1 of 5 



2.0 PROJECT ORGANIZATION AND RESPONSIBILITY 

The Project Organizational Chart for the MMR work plan is shown 
in Figure 2. The responsibilities of key personnel are defined 
below. 

Project Officer (NGB) 

The NGB's designated Project Officer has the overall 
responsibility for the direction of the project. The PO is MMR 
representative that has the responsibility of seeing that Sevenson 
fulfills its obligation according to the contract and the approved 
work plan. The PO's objective is to insure that the SOW is 
followed along with H & S and QA/QC guidelines approved for this 
project. 

Project Management 

The Sevenson project manager has the overall responsibility for 
management of the project and the authority to commit the resources 
necessary to meet project objectives and requirements. The project 
manager must ensure that technical, financial, and scheduling 
objectives are achieved successfully. The project manager will: 

Define project objectives and develop a detailed work 
plan schedule; 

Establish project policy and procedures to address the 
specific needs of the project as a whole, as well as the 
objectives of each task; 

Ensure that proper materials, instruments and qualified 
personnel are available; 

Designate individuals to assist in discharging the 
quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) 
responsibilities; 

Review and analyze overall task performance with respect 
to planned requirements and authorizations; 

Collect, compile, and review all field and laboratory 
analytical data; 

Coordinate the preparation of and ensure the quality of 
interim and final reports. 

Chris Rice will serve as Project Manager of the MMR Site. Mike 
Lock, Midwest Division Manager at Sevenson shall appoint and 
designate an experienced supervisor who will follow directions from 
the Project Manager, QA Director and NGB's PO. Sevenson' s staff 
has a responsibility to adhere to the SOW and discuss and 
deviations and/or changes with the PO for his approval. 



Revision: Final 
Date: January 15, 1998 
Section: 2 
Page 2 of 5 



Site Supervisor 

The site supervisor is responsible for leading and coordinating 
the day-to-day activities of the various field operational and 
technical staff under his supervision. The responsibilities of the 
site supervisor include: 

Provision of day-to-day coordination with the project 
manager on technical issues; 

Development and implementation of field-related work 
plans, assurance of schedule compliance and adherence to 
management-developed study requirements. 

Coordination and management of field personnel including 
sampling, treatment system operators, material handling 
and field laboratory staffs; 

Implementation of QC for technical data provided by the 
field staff and QA/QC Coordinator including field 
measurement data; 

Adherence to work schedules provided by the project 
manager; 

Coordination and oversight of subcontractors assisting 
Sevenson. 

The site supervisor assigns daily work and supervises the field 
crew consisting of foreman, equipment operators and clean-up 
technicians as detailed in the Work Plan. Mr. Kurt McAllister has 
been selected to serve as the site supervisor. 

Technical Staff 

The technical staff will be supervised by the Director of 
Treatment Services, Chris Rice. The staff will be drawn from 
Sevenson' s pool of corporate resources. The technical team staff 
will be utilized to gather and analyze data, and to prepare various 
task reports and support materials. All of the designated 
technical team members are experienced professionals who possess 
the degree of specialization and technical competence required to 
effectively and efficiently perform the required work. The 
technical staff consists of environmental engineers and scientists, 
permitting specialists and health and safety officers. They are 
located at both our Niagara Falls HQ and Midwest Division and may 
be mobilized to the site as needed. 

OA/OC Director 

Dr. James Hyzy, Waste Stream Technology serves as the QA/QC 
director and will remain independent of direct job involvement and 
day-to-day operations, and has direct access to corporate senior 
management as necessary to resolve any QA/QC dispute. The 



Revision: Final 
Date: January 15, 1998 
Section: 2 
Page 3 of 5 



3 



individual is responsible for auditing the implementation of the 
QA/QC program in conformance with the demands of specific 
investigations, Sevenson's policies, and NGB requirements. 
Specific functions and duties include: 

Providing QA/QC audits on various phases of the field 
operations; 

Review and approval of QA/QC plans and procedures; 

Reporting on the adequacy, status, and effectiveness of 
the QA/QC program on a regular basis to the management 
staff. If problems are detected, the QA Director 
monitors the effectiveness of corrective actions taken 
and formulates policies and procedures consistent with 
USEPA protocols and guidelines on QA/QC requirements. 

OA/OC Coordinator 

The QA/QC coordinator is responsible for reviewing and 
maintaining a central file on all aspects of QA/QC including the 
analytical data for project. The QA/QC coordinator's 
responsibilities include: 

Assisting the project manager and site supervisor in 
specifying the QA/QC procedures to be used during the 
project; 

Providing QA/QC technical assistance to the project 
staff; 

Verifying that laboratory quality control and analytical 
procedures are being followed as specified in the work 
plan. 

Making recommendations to the Site Supervisor and the 
Project Manager with respect to implementation of the 
QA/QC Coordinator. If problems are detected, the QA/QC 
Coordinator takes appropriate corrective actions. 

Preparing QA/QC reports for review by the client and the 
agency. 

In addition, the QA/QC Coordinator receives and keeps track of 
analytical results of known quality, and accompanying QA/QC for 
samples sent to a subcontract laboratory for independent analysis. 
The QA/QC Coordinator audits subcontract laboratories for various 
levels of DQO and maintains a list of approved subcontract 
laboratories. 



Revision: Final 
Date: January 15, 1998 
Section: 2 
Page 4 of 5 



On-site Project Chemist 

The project chemist, Nancy Meyer is responsible for leading and 
coordinating the day-to-day laboratory activities. Specific 
project chemist responsibilities include: 

Implement and follow QAPjP approved by the NGB's PO; 

- Coordinate, receive and ship waste samples under chain- 
of-custody (C-O-C) ; 

Verify that laboratory quality control and analytical 
procedures are being followed as specified in the work 
plan; 

Perform on-site sampling, sample handling and analytical 
QA/QC for mobile lab; 

Determine which repeat samples or analyses is required, 
if questionable data exists; 

- Maintain records of all incoming samples, tracking these 
samples through subsequent processing and analysis, and 
ultimately, disposing of the samples after all QA/QC 
requirements have been satisfied; 

Prepare quality control samples for analysis prior to and 
during the project; 

Prepare quality control and sample data for review by the 
QA/QC Coordinator and the Site Supervisor; 

Maintain a record of all C-O-C and file on all analytical 
data for the project on-site in a mobile laboratory. 



FIGURE 2 



*) 



qa/qc prgjEct qrganiza t :en 

MASSACHUSE T TS MILITARY RESERVATION 



NGB PROJECT 
OFFICER 



VICE PRESIDENT 
LARRY ELIA 



MIDWEST DIV. MGR./ 
V.P. OPERATIONS 

MICHAEL LOCK 



DIRECTOR OF TREATMENT 
SERVICES 

CHRIS RICE 



SEVENSON 
PROJECT MANAGER 

CHRIS RICE 



SITE SUPERVISOR 



FIELD CREV 

FOREMAN 
OPERATORS 
LABORERS 



QA/QC DIRECTOR 
DR. JAMES HYZY 



FIELD TECHNICAL STAFF 
PROJECT CHEMIST 



SUBCONTRACT 
LABORATORY 

WASTE STREAM 
TECHNOLOGY, INC. 



Revision: Final 
Date: January 15, 1998 
Section: 3 
Page 1 of 3 



3.0 QUALITY ASSURANCE OBJECTIVES FOR MEASUREMENT DATA 

The overall QA objective is to develop and implement procedures 
for field sampling, chain-of-custody, laboratory analysis, and 
reporting that will provide results which are legally defensible in 
a court of law. Specific procedures for sampling, chain of 
custody, laboratory instruments calibration, laboratory analysis, 
data reporting, internal quality control, audits, preventive 
maintenance of field equipment, and corrective action are described 
in other sections of this QAPjP. The purpose of this section is to 
address the specific objectives for accuracy, precision, 
completeness, representativeness, and comparability. 

3.1 LEVEL OF QUALITY CONTROL EFFORT 

In the sections that follow, various types of "blank", 
"duplicate", and "split" samples are specified. Unless further 
elaborated in the text, these are defined as follows: 

Preparation Blank: A preparation blank consist of a blank solution 
of distilled or deionized water and treated as a sample to be run 
with the batch of samples to be analyzed. The blank is subjected 
to all pretreatment, digestion, and dilution of concentration 
procedures and analyzed on the instrument or instruments that the 
associated samples were analyzed by. 

Reagent Blank: Reagent blanks consist of analyte-free water and 
reagents used in the procedure and treated as a sample to be run 
with the batch of samples to be analyzed. The blank is subjected 
to all pretreatment, digestion, and dilution of concentration 
procedures and analyzed on the instrument or instruments that the 
associated samples were analyzed by. Reagent blanks are used to 
find the sources of contamination, artifacts, and/or interferences 
during analysis. 

Equipment Blank: Equipment blanks consist of distilled water that 
are opened in the field and the contents are poured appropriately 
over or through the sample collection, collected in a sample 
container, and returned to the laboratory as a sample. Equipment 
blanks are a check on sampling device cleanliness. 

Field Split: A single composite sample subdivided into two 
portions, each of which has a unique annotation (i.e., blind) but 
are both sent to the same laboratory for analysis. The results 
will provide an indication of the precision (reproducibility) of 
the laboratory analytical procedure. 



I 






Revision: Final 
Date: January 15, 1998 
Section: 3 
Page 2 of 3 



Matrix Spike/Matrix Spike Duplicate: A subsample of an 
investigatory sample to which the laboratory adds a spike 
containing analytes at known concentrations prior to digestion and 
distillation of the sample to assess the effect of sample matrix on 
the digestion and measurement methodology. 

For QA 2 objective, requirement for a matrix spike is optional. 
Nevertheless, % recoveries will be checked on the TCLP extract 
spike. For metals, especially TCLP lead, matrix spikes and trip 
blanks are not required as per the SW-846. 

3.2 ACCURACY, PRECISION, AND SENSITIVITY OF ANALYSIS 

The fundamental QA objective with respect to accuracy, 
precision, and sensitivity of laboratory analytical data will be to 
achieve the QC acceptance criteria of the analytical protocols. 

ACCURACY is a measure of the bias in the system. It is the 
degree of agreement of a measurement with an accepted reference or 
true value. Accuracy will be determined by the measure of the 
recovery of a compound spiked in a sample and is mathematically 
defined as follows: 

% Recovery = SSR - SR x 100 

SA 
where: 

SSR = Spiked sample results 
SR = Sample result 
SA = Spike added 

PRECISION is a measure of agreement among individual 
measurements of the same property, usually under prescribed similar 
conditions. It is a quantitative measure of the variability of two 
or more measurements compared to their average value and is 
mathematically expressed as follows: 

% RPD = (SI - S2) /2 x 100 
SI + S2 

where: 

SI and S2 are duplicate spikes added or duplicate sample 
analytical values for a given parameter. 



The accuracy, precision and sensitivity requirements for the 
subcontract laboratory are given in the Standard Operating 



♦ 



i 



Revision: Final 
Date: January 15, 1998 
Section: 3 
Page 3 of 3 



Procedures (SOPs) found in this QAPjP. The accuracy, precision and 
sensitivity requirements for the Sevenson mobile laboratory are 
provided in this Section of the QAPP. 

3.3 COMPLETENESS, REPRESENTATIVENESS AND COMPARABILITY 

COMPLETENESS is a measure of the amount of valid data obtained 
from a measurement system compared to the amount that was expected 
to be obtained under normal conditions. It is expected that the 
subcontract laboratory will provide data meeting QC acceptance 
criteria for 95 per cent or more for all samples tested using the 
EPA methods specified in the QAPjP. Following completion of the 
analytical testing, the percent completeness will be calculated by 
the following equation: 

% Completeness = (number of valid data) X 100 

(number of samples collected 
for each parameter analyses) 

REPRESENTATIVENESS expresses the degree to which data 
accurately and precisely represent a characteristic of a 
population, parameter variations at a sampling point, a process 
condition, or an environmental condition. Representativeness is a 
qualitative parameter which is dependent upon the proper design of 
the sampling program and proper laboratory protocol. The sampling 
network was designed to provide data representative of site 
conditions. During development of this network, consideration was 
given to the existing analytical data and physical setting. The 
rational of the sampling network is discussed in detail in the 
field sampling plan. Representativeness will be satisfied by 
insuring that the Field Sampling Plan is followed, proper sampling 
techniques are used, proper analytical procedures are followed and 
holding times of the samples are not exceeded in the laboratory. 
Representativeness will be assessed by the analysis of field 
duplicated samples. 

COMPARABILITY expresses the confidence with which one data set 
can be compared with another. The extent to which existing and 
planned analytical data will be comparable depends on the 
similarity of sampling and analytical methods. The procedures used 
to obtain planned analytical data, as documented in the QAPP, are 
expected to provide comparable data. These new analytical data, 
however, may not be directly comparable to existing data because of 
difference in procedures and QA objectives. 



Revision: Final 
Date: January 15, 1998 
Section: 4 
Page 1 of 4 



4.0 SAMPLING PROCEDURES 

Details of sampling procedures are presented in the Sampling and 
Analytical Plan (Section 6.0) of the Work Plan. The field sampling 
procedures plan consists of the following activities: 

Sampling plan and selection of sampling locations 
Sampling equipment and techniques 
- Sample containers, preservatives and holding times 
Paperwork and notes on sampling conditions 
Sample shipping and transportation 

Sampling Plan and Selection of Sampling Points 

The sampling grid is designed to meet the criteria of 
representativeness and reproducibility. The grid system will 
utilize 30 ft by 30 ft squares to a depth of 1 ft in order to 
collect a representative sample of the lot for treatability. 
Treated material will be sampled for TCLP-lead for each batch of 
500 tons of processed material. 

Sample equipment and techniques 

A list of sampling devices is given in Table #3 following this 
section. Samples will be collected with clean steel hand spatulas. 
Samples will be placed in sealed glass jars equipped with Teflon- 
lined lids, and placed on ice. Decontamination procedures are 
presented in the Sampling and Analytical Plan for the MMR Site 
Mobile Laboratory. 

Field duplicates and split samples are generated from a single 
collection utilizing all the material obtained and representatively 
distributed between various sampling jars. Replicates are collected 
from the same matrix at the same time utilizing the same procedures 
and equipment, however, the point of collection is adjacent to each 
other. Field QA/QC samples are documented in the sample log. 
Samples may be spiked by the subcontract laboratory or Sevenson's 
mobile laboratory. Blank samples are sent to the laboratory to 
find any sample contamination during the entire process. 

Sample Containers, Preservatives, and Holding Times 

Samples are collected in sealed glass jars equipped with 
Teflon-lined lids and cooled to 4°C by placing in an ice-filled 
cooler. For samples to be analyzed for TCLP lead, maximum holding 
time for samples from field collection to TCLP extraction is 180 
days in a refrigerator at 4 degrees celsius. Maximum holding time 
for the TCLP extract is 180 days. For samples to be analyzed for 
total lead, the maximum holding time is six months. 



Revision: Final 
Date: January 15, 1998 
Section: 4 
Page 2 of 4 



Paperwork and Notes on Sampling Conditions 

After proper labeling, numbering and identification of each 
sample, appropriate chain-of-custody forms are completed as 
described in Section 5 of the QAPjP. Sampling conditions and major 
visible or self-evident characteristics are noted, such as color, 
physical state, odor, specific appearance, etc. Paperwork may 
include preparation of sample logs, shipping papers and special 
instructions, if any, to the sample receiving entity. A sample of 
the field sample tracking report form is attached at the end of 
this section for use by the field crew. 

Field personnel will be responsible for entering all daily 
field activities, measurements and observations in a bound field 
log book. All data will be recorded legibly in the log book with 
each day's entries signed and dated. The field log book will be 
assigned to each individual with all pages numbered. The personnel 
responsible for the changes will initial and date all modifications 
to the log. Upon completion of all field work, the field log book 
placed in the project file. 

Sample Shipping and Transportation 

All samples are shipped on time or on the same day as sample 
to the receiving entity such as the subcontract laboratory or 
disposal facility. Shipments follow guideline of the carrier(s) 
and the Department of Transportation (DOT) . For chain-of-custody 
procedures see Section 5 of the QAPjP. 

A sample history will be maintained in a bound notebook by the 
laboratory. For custody, see Section 5.0. 

Sampling and analytical methods used in the field and laboratory 
will conform to the latest requirements of the U.S. EPA. NPDES 
(National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System) , RCRA (Resource 
Conservation and Recovery Act) , air pollution control, pretreatment 
effluent guidelines, OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health 
Administration) , and NIOSH (National Institute of Occupational 
Safety and Health) specifics are referenced later in this document. 
The methods often utilized are short-listed below. 

Methods for Chemical Analysis of Water and Wastes, 14th 

edition, U.S. EPA, 1983. 

Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater, 

18th edition, APHA/AWWA/WPCF, 1992. 

Annual Book of ASTM Standards, Part 31, Water, ASTM, 1979. 

U.S. EPA Approved Methods for Sampling and Analysis of Solid 

Waste, 1982. 

Sampling and Analysis Methods for Hazardous Waste Combustion, 

EPA-600/8-84-002. 

Technical Assistance Document for Sampling and Analysis of 

Toxic Organic Compounds in Ambient Air, EPA-600/4-83-027 . 



* 



Revision: Final 
Date: January 15, 1998 
Section: 4 
Page 3 of 4 



Occupational Safety and Health Guidance Manual for Hazardous 

Waste Site Activities, NIOSH/OSHA/USCG/EPA, 1985. 

Sevenson Document #120.00, x x Technical Services Field Guidance 

Manual," Volume I, 2nd edition, March 1989. 

Test Methods for Evaluating Solid Waste (SW-846) , 

Physical/Chemical Methods, Waste Characterization Branch, 

Office of Solid Waste, U.S. EPA, Washington, DC, April 1984. 

Current editions of these references are maintained to ensure that 
up-to-date methods are used. Standardized written analytical 
procedures are also prepared and followed with all laboratories. 



* 



TABLE 3 

SAMPLING DEVICES FOR CONTAMINATED SOIL MATERIALS 

AND WASTE PILES 



WASTE CATEGORY 



SAMPLERS USED 



SOIL AND CONTAMINATED 
DIRT 



Soil auger 

Trowel/scoop/spoon/spatula 

Pos thole digger/ shovel/pick-ax/spade 

Split spoon sampler 

Velhmeyer sampler 

Sampling trier 

Dipper 



WASTE PILES 



Waste pile sampler 
Sampling trier (large) 
Dipper 



n 



Revision: Final 
Date: January 15, 1998 
Section: 5 
Page 1 of 6 



5.0 SAMPLE CUSTODY 

It is Sevenson's Policy to follow the U.S. EPA sample custody 
procedures, or chain of custody protocols as described in "NEIC 
Policies and Procedures' 1 , EPA-330/9-78DDI-R, Revised June 1985. 
This custody is in three parts: Sample collection, Laboratory 
analysis, and Final evidence files. Final evidence files, including 
all originals of laboratory reports and purge files, are maintained 
under document control in a secure area. 

A sample or evidence file is under your custody if they 

* are in your possession; 

* are in your view, after being in your possession; 

* are in your possession and you place them in a 
secured location; or 

* are in a designated secure area. 

An example of the chain-of-custody record form is attached in this 
section which Sevenson developed in conformance with USEPA 
^ guidelines. 

5.1 FIELD CHAIN OF CUSTODY PROCEDURES 

The sample packaging and shipment procedures summarized below will 
insure that the samples will arrive at the laboratory with the 
chain of custody intact. The protocol for specific sample 
numbering using case numbers and traffic report numbers if 
applicable and other sample designations are included in the Work 
Plan which shall follow guidelines outlined in the Technical 
Services Field Guidance Manual. 



5.1.1 Field Procedures 

(a) The field sampler is personally responsible for the care 
and custody of the samples until they are transferred or 
properly dispatched. As FEW people as possible should 
handle the samples. 

(b) All bottles will be tagged with sample numbers and 
locations. A log of all samples for the project will be 
maintained in chronological order. 

(c) Sample tags will be completed for each sample using 
waterproof ink unless prohibited by weather conditions. 
For example, a logbook notation would explain that a 
pencil was used to fill out the sample tag because the 
ballpoint pen would not function in freezing weather. 



Revision: Final 
Date: January 15, 1998 
Section: 5 
Page 2 of 6 



(d) The NGB's Project Officer (PO) and Sevenson's Project 
Superintendent will review all field activities to 
determine whether proper custody procedures were followed 
during the field work and decide if additional samples 
are reguired. 

5.1.2 Field Logbooks /Documentation 

Field logbook will provide the means of recording data 
collecting activities performed. As such, entries will be 
described in as much detail as possible so that persons going 
to the site could re-construct a particular situation without 
reliance on memory. 

Field logbooks will be bound, field survey books or notebooks. 
Logbooks will be assigned to field personnel, but will stored 
in the document control center when not in use. Each logbook 
will be identified by the project-specific document number. 

The title page of each logbook will contain the 
following: 

* Person to whom the logbook is assigned. 

* Logbook number. 

* Project name. 

* Project start date, and 

* End date. 



Entries into the logbook will contain a variety of 
information. At the beginning of each entry, the date, start 
time, weather, names of all sampling team members present, 
level of personal protection being used, and the signature of 
the person making the entry will be entered. The names of 
visitors to the site, field sampling or investigation team 
personnel and the purpose of their visit will also be recorded 
in the field logbook. 

Measurements made and samples collected will be recorded. All 
entries will be made in ink and no erasures will be made. If 
an incorrect entry is made, the information will be crossed 
out with a single strike mark. Whenever a sample is collected, 
or a measurement is made, a detailed description of the 
location of the station, which includes compass and distance 
measurements, shall be recorded. The number of the photographs 
taken of the station, if any, will also be noted. All 
eguipment used to make measurements will be identified, along 
with the date of calibration. 



Revision: Final 
Date: January 15, 1998 
Section: 5 
Page 3 of 6 



Samples will be collected following the sampling procedures 
documented in the Field Sample Plan (FSP) , Appendix A of 
QAPjP. The equipment used to collect samples will be noted, 
along with the time of sampling, sample description, depth at 
which the sample was collected, volume and number of 
containers. Sample identification number will be assigned 
prior to sample collection. Field duplicate samples, which 
will receive an entirely separate sample identification 
number, will be noted under sample description. 

5.1.3 Transfer Of Custody and Shipment Procedures 

(a) Samples are accompanied by a properly completed chain of 
custody form. The sample numbers and locations will be 
listed on the chain of custody form. When transferring 
the possession of samples, the individuals relinquishing 
and receiving will sign, date, and note the time on the 
record. This record documents transfer of custody of 
samples from the sampler to another person, to a mobile 
laboratory, to the permanent laboratory, or to/from a 
secure storage area. 

(b) Samples will be properly packaged for shipment and 
dispatched to the appropriate laboratory for analysis, 
with a separate signed custody record enclosed in each 
sample box or cooler. Shipping containers will be locked 
and secured with strapping tape and EPA custody seals for 
shipment to the laboratory. The preferred procedure 
includes use of a custody seal attached to the front 
right and back left of the cooler. The custody seals are 
covered with clear plastic tape. The cooler is strapped 
shut with strapping tape in at least two locations. 

(c) Whenever samples are co-located with a source or , a 
separate Sample Receipt is prepared for those samples and 
marked to indicate with whom the samples are being co- 
located. The person relinquishing the samples to the 
facility or agency should request the representatives 
signature acknowledging sample receipt. If the 
representative is unavailable or refuses, this is noted 
in the "Received By" space. 

(d) All shipments will be accompanied by the Chain of Custody 
Record identifying the contents. The original record will 
accompany the shipment, and the pink and yellow copies 
will be retained by the sampler for returning to the 
sampling office. 

(e) If the samples are sent by common carrier, a bill of 
lading should be used. Receipts of bills of lading will 
be retained as part of the permanent documentation. If 
sent by mail, the package will be registered with return 
receipt requested. Commercial carriers are not required 



I 



Revision: Final 
Date: January 15, 1998 
Section: 5 
Page 4 of 6 



to sign off on the custody form as long as the custody 
forms are sealed inside the sample cooler and the custody 
seals remain intact. 



5.2 FINAL EVIDENCE FILES CUSTODY PROCEDURES 

The evidence files for analytical data are maintained at Sevenson's 
on-site mobile laboratory. The content of the evidence file will 
include all relevant records, reports, correspondence, logs, field 
logbooks, laboratory sample preparation and Analysis logbooks, data 
package, pictures, subcontractor's reports, chain of custody 
records/ forms, data review reports, etc. . The evidence file will 
be under custody of Sevenson's site manger in a locked, secured 
area. A copy of all analytical data from Sevenson's mobile 
laboratory as well as from any outside subcontract laboratory shall 
be maintained for validation and review at the corporate office by 
the QA/QC coordinator for control filing and processing. Copies of 
all data and other information will be supplied to the NGB in the 
final project report. 



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CLIEKI NAME 



SAMPLE DESCRIPTION 



PROJECT SO. 



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PLAHT: 

DATE: 

TIKE: 

MEDIA: 

SAMPLE TYPE:. 



SAMPl£G ET 



SAMPLE [Q NO. 



LOCATION:. 



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FIGURE 2: EXAMPLE OF GENERAL SAMPLE TAG 



I '! 



Revision: Final 
Date: January 15, 1998 
Section: 6 
Page 1 of 15 



6.0 CALIBRATION PROCEDURES AND FREQUENCY 

This section describes procedures for maintaining the accuracy of 
all the instruments and measuring equipment which are used for 
conducting field tests and laboratory analyses. These instruments 
and equipment should be calibrated prior to each use or scheduled, 
periodic basis. 

6.1 FIELD INSTRUMENTS /EQUIPMENT 

Instruments and equipment used to gather, generate, or measure 
environmental data will be calibrated with sufficient frequency and 
in such a manner that accuracy and reproducibility of results are 
consistent with the manufacturer's specifications. 

Equipment to be used doing the field sampling will be examined to 
certify that it is operating condition. Chemical feed system 
calibration will be as per manufacturer's specifications. All 
electronic weighing devices will be checked against certified 
scales with soil and/or chemical placed in tared transport 
vehicles. This includes checking the manufacturing's operating 
manual and the instruction and the instructions for each instrument 
to ensure that all maintenance requirements are being observed. 
Field notes from previous sampling trips will be reviewed so that 
the notation on any prior equipment problem are not overlooked, and 
all necessary repairs to equipment have been carried out. A spare 
electrode will be sent with each pH meter to be used for field 
measurements. 



Calibration of field instruments is governed by the specific 
Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for the applicable field 
analysis method, and such procedures take precedence over the 
following general discussion. 

Calibration of field instruments will be performed at the intervals 
specified by the manufacturer or more frequently as conditions 
dictate. Field instruments will include a pH meter, thermometer, 
specific conductivity meter, Buck Scientific AA, sonicator, TCLP 
tumbler and filtration device. In the event that an internally 
calibrated field instrument fails to meet calibration/checkout 
procedures, it will be returned on the manufacturer for service. 

The pH meter will be calibrated with standard buffer solutions 
prior to a field trip. In the field, the meter will be calibrated 
daily with two buffers before use. Thereafter, the meter will be 
checked against two buffer solutions will be used for each field 
trip. Calibration procedures and frequency will be recorded in a 
field log book along with the lot numbers of the buffer. General 
procedures for pH meter, specific conductivity meter, thermometer, 



Revision: Final 
Date: January 15, 1998 
Section: 6 
Page 2 of 15 



and atomic absorption spectrophotometer for metal analysis are 
described here: 

pH Calibration 

* Temperature of sample and buffer should be the same. 

* Connect pH electrode into pH meter and turn on pH meter. 

* Set temperature setting based on the temperature of buffer; 
place electrode in first buffer solution. 

* After reading has stabilized, adjust "CALIB" knob to display 
correct value. 

* Repeat procedure for second buffer solution. 

* Place pH electrode in the sample and record the pH as 
displayed. 

* Remove pH electrode from sample and rinse off with distilled 
water. 

* The pH meter must be recalibrated every time it is turned off 
and turned back on, or if it starts giving erratic results. 

The calibrations performed, standard used, and sample pH values are 
to be recorded in the field notebook. Appropriate new batteries 
will be purchased and kept with the meters to facilitate immediate 
replacement in the field as necessary. 

Temperature Calibration 

Temperature measurements are carried out utilizing a thermometer. 
The thermometers must be inspected before use to ensure there is no 
mercury separation. The thermometers should be rechecked in the 
field before and after use to see if the readings are logical and 
the mercury is still intact. The thermometers should be checked 
biannually for calibration, by immersing them in a bath of known 
temperature until eguilibrium is reached. They should be discarded 
if found to have more than 10% error. The reference thermometer 
used for the bath calibration should be NBS traceable. 

Conductivity Meter Calibration 

The conductivity cells of the specific conductivity meter will be 
cleaned and checked against known conductivity standards before 
each field trip. In the field, the instrument will be checked 
daily with NBS traceable standards. The calibration procedure is 
described on the next page. 



Revision: Final 
Date: January 15, 1998 
Section: 6 
Page 3 of 15 



*> 



* Place the probe in conductivity calibration standard solution. 

* Set temperature knob for temperature of standard solution. 

* Turn to appropriate scale and set the instrument for the value 
of calibration standard. 

* Rinse off the electrode with distilled water. 

* Measure the conductivity for distilled water to be used for a 
field blank, making sure temperature is set correctly for 
temperature of solution to be tested. 

* If the conductivity of blank (distilled water) is high, it 
must be discarded and a new blank sample procured. 

All readings and calibrations should be recorded in the field 
notebook. 

Metals Analysis in the Field 

The Buck Scientific direct flame Atomic Absorption 
Spectrophotometer (AAS) will be calibrated by use of a minimum of 
three calibration standards prepared by dilution of certified stock 
solutions. An analysis blank is prepared with one calibration 
standard at the quantification limit for the metal. The other 
standards bracket the concentration range of the samples. 
Calibration standards will contain acids at the same concentration 
as the digestates. 

A continuing calibration standard, prepared from a different stock 
solution than that used for preparation of the calibration 
standards, is prepared and analyzed after each ten samples or each 
two hours of continuous operation. The value of the continuing 
calibration standard concentration must agree with + 10 percent of 
the initial value or the appropriate corrective action is taken 
which may include recalibrating the instrument and reanalyzing the 
previous ten samples. 

Calibration of laboratory equipment will be based on approved 
written procedures. Records of calibration, repairs, or 
replacement will be filed and maintained by the designated 
laboratory personal performing quality control activities. These 
records will be filed at the location where the work is performed 
and will be subject to QA audit. For all instruments, the 
laboratory will maintain a factory-trained repair staff with in- 
house spare parts or will maintain service contracts with vendors. 

The records of calibration will be kept as follows: 

* If possible each instrument will have record of calibration 
permanently affixed with an assigned record number. On a 



I 



( 



&\ 



Revision: Final 
Date: January 15, 1998 
Section: 6 
Page 4 of 15 



record or log book with said information will be kept beside 
or near the instrument. 

A label will be affixed to each instrument showing 
description, manufacturer, model numbers, date of last 
calibration, by whom calibrated (signature) , and due date of 
next calibration reports and compensation or correction 
figures will be maintained with instrument. 

A written stepwise calibration procedure will be available for 
each piece of test and measurement. 

Any instrument that is not calibrated to with the 
manufacturer's original specification will display a warning 
tag to alert that analyst that the devise carries only a 
"Limited Calibration". 



6.2 CALIBRATION CHECK AND PROCEDURES 

A calibration check is done by analyzing for analyte standards in 
an appropriate solvent. Calibration check solutions are made from 
a stock solution that is different from the stock used daily to 
prepare standards. 

Instruments and equipment will be operated, calibrated, and 
maintained according to the manufacturer's instructions and/or U.S. 
EPA approved analytical procedures. Records of instrument 
calibration will be maintained. Specific calibration procedures 
for matrix phases and unique parameters will be verified by U.S. 
EPA approved protocols. Calibrations will follow U.S. EPA SW-846 
page one-1 to one-57, other Method Procedures (MP) or SOP. 

Calibration procedure includes a series of standards usually 4-6 
points for the analyte or pollutant under investigation. Primary 
standards are made from analytical reagent (AR) grade chemicals and 
marked as stock solution with a date, name of analyst or 
technician, and expiration date for the stock. Secondary standards 
are made fresh daily from dilution of primary standards for each 
batch or test run. 

Initial instrument calibration curves are verified using 
statistical methods and quantitative techniques. These include 
regression and correlation analyses of each test run. Laboratory 
analysts are trained to record and document all instrumental runs 
in logbooks assigned to each work area and instruments housed 
therein. Instrument operating parameters, settings, and 
performance data generated from each run are stored with manuals 
and instructions provided by the manufacturer. A log of instrument 
servicing, parts replacement, and recalibrations is maintained in 
the same work area. Figures 5 and 6 illustrate the initial and 
continuing calibration verification for various metals and cyanide. 



* 



Revision: Final 
Date: January 15, 1998 
Section: 6 
Page 5 of 15 



-> 



Sevenson reviews the Quality Assurance Program Plans of its 
subcontract laboratories routinely and makes sure that instruments 
employed for organic and inorganic analyses are calibrated annually 
or semiannually under the manufacturers' service contracts. 
Thermometers are calibrated against an NBS certified thermometer. 
Likewise, analytical balances are checked against NBS certified 
weights. 

All glassware and plasticware (volumetric) conform to NBS Class A 
standards. All calibrations are recorded and documented in 
laboratory notebooks as well as in the logbook of the analyst 
performing the initial calibration and subsequent recalibrations. 
All parameter measurements are directly traceable to primary 
standards. Reagent grade water and solvents are used for dilution 
of stocks traceable to primary standards. 



6.3 GENERAL LABORATORY PRACTICES 

Water Supply: Water quality requirements vary depending on the 
analysis to be performed. Water used for the preparation of 
reagent solutions must be free of measurable amounts of the 
constituent to be determined. Distilled deionized water having a 
specific conductance between 2.0 and 0.5 micromhos per centimeter 
is satisfactory for most analyses and will be used for dilutions, 
preparation of reagents, standards, and final rinsing of glassware. 

Some analyses may require special treatment or conditioning of 
distilled water. Periodic checks will be made to determine if the 
quality of the water supply is adequate for its intended use. 

Air Supply: Compressed air will be free of contaminants. This can 
be achieved by proper selection of the type of compressor and the 
installation of appropriate filters. 

Glassware and Plasticware: Borosilicate glassware will be used. 
Plastics of polyethylene, polystyrene, polypropylene, teflon, or 
polyvinyl may be used where applicable. Some reagents and standard 
solutions will be stored in glass or plastic only or may require 
other special storage considerations. Appropriate glassware or 
plasticware will be used so to avoid contamination or interferences 
with sample matrix and/or analyses. 

Volumetric glassware will be used in the preparation of standards, 
reagents, and dilutions, and will be xx Class A" to provide highest 
accuracy. 

Clean glassware is essential to avoid contamination and ensure 
accuracy from volumetric glassware. Cleaning methods depend upon 
the substances to be removed and the analytical determinations to 
be performed. No detergents or solvents that will interfere with 
test results will be used for cleaning. 



Revision: Final 
Date: January 15, 1998 
Section: 6 
Page 6 of 15 



Reagents and Solvents: Analytical reagent grade AR (conforming to 
ACS specifications) or equivalent chemicals will be used unless 
otherwise specified by an individual analytical procedure. These 
are satisfactory for most inorganic determinations; however, some 
special considerations are necessary for certain analyses: 

Metals Analysis - Reagents, solvents, and standards used in 
metals analysis will be of spectroquality but, in some 
cases, may be of AR grade. 

AR grade reagents and solvents are the minimum requirement for 
organic analyses. Special note will be taken of the assay 
of standard materials. Whenever greater purity is needed, 
the reagent or solvent of that purity will be employed. 

All chemicals will be dated upon receipt of shipment and upon date 
of first use and replaced when shelf life is exceeded. Reagents 
and solvents will also be periodically compared with primary 
standards from the National Bureau of Standards or other reliable 
sources to verify their quality. 

Gases: Quality requirements for compressed gases vary depending on 
the requirements of different analytical procedures. Some of the 
more common requirements are listed below: 

Atomic Absorption - Fuel and oxidant gases can be of 
commercial grade unless otherwise specified in an analytical 
procedure. In order to avoid contamination from gases 
other than acetylene, acetylene tanks will not be used when 
the pressure remaining in the tank is below 100 pounds. All 
other gas cylinders will be replaced when pressures drop 
below 100 to 200 pounds to avoid contamination. 
Gas Chromatography - The quality of gases required for gas 
chromatograph determination vary with the type of detectors. 
For the most part, compressed gases will be a prepurif ied 
dry grade and will be replaced when pressures drop to 100 to 
200 pounds to avoid contamination. Combustion gases will be 
treated by molecular sieves, carrier gas filters, and drying 
tubes. Nitrogen and electron capture detectors require 
the use of ultra-high purity gases. 

Standards 

Standards and standard solutions, whether purchased or prepared, 
will be in accordance with the analytical method and clearly 
labeled, dated, and initialed. Special attention will be paid to 
storage requirements (temperature, light, preservatives, container 
material, etc.), and standards will not be kept longer than 
recommended by the manufacturer or in the analytical method. 

^^ Instruments: Calibration and Maintenance 






Instruments and equipment will be operated, calibrated, and 
maintained according to the manufacturer's instructions and/or 
analytical procedure. Records of instrument calibration will be 



Revision: Final 
Date: January 15, 1998 
Section: 6 
Page 7 of 15 



' 



maintained. Specific calibration procedures for matrix phases and 
unique parameters will be verified by U.S. EPA approved protocols. 

Quality Control Procedures 

1. A written description of the current laboratory quality 
control program will be available for review. A record of 
analytical quality control tests and quality control checks on 
materials and equipment must be prepared and retained for 
three years. 

2. A laboratory manual containing complete written instructions 
for each analytical procedure which the laboratory performs 
will be maintained, including instructions for handling 
quality control data for that test. 

3. After a standard reagent curve composed of a minimum of a 
reagent blank and three standards has been prepared, 
subsequent standard curves will be verified by use of at least 
one reagent blank and one standard at or near the maximum 
allowable concentration. Daily checks must be within 10 
percent of the original curve. 

4. If 20 or more samples per day are analyzed, working standard 
curves will be verified by running an additional standard at 
or near the maximum allowable concentration every 20 samples. 
Daily checks must be within 10 percent of the original curve. 

5. At least one duplicate sample will be run every 20 samples, or 
with each set of samples, to verify precision of the method. 

6. Standard deviation may be calculated and documented for all 
measurements conducted. 

7. Quality control charts or a tabulation mean and standard 
deviation may be used to document acceptability of data on a 
project basis. 

8. Standard x> Class S" weights will be available at the 
laboratory to make periodic checks or balances. 

9. At least one thermometer certified by the National Bureau of 
Standards will be available to check thermometers in ovens, 
etc. 

10. Color standards or equivalent will be available to verify 
wavelength settings on spectrophotometers. 

11. Chemical expiration dates will be noted upon receipt of 
shipment and replaced as needed or, if earlier, before shelf 
life has been exceeded. 

12. Records will be kept by the laboratory in accordance with 
documentation requirements specified in the contract. 

Sample Preservation 

Upon collection of representative sample matrixes, the containers 
will be preserved on site, if at all possible, prior to completion 
of chain-of-custody documentation. Preservation methodology will 
follow protocols specified by U.S. EPA regulations (40 CFR Part 36 
- 12/3/79) and all additional regulatory guidelines. These methods 
are outlined in the following tables. 



Q- C- Re pore No. 



La3 NAnt 



INITIAL A>0 CONTINUING CALIBRATION VERIFICATION 
CaS£ NO. 



DaTE. 






UNITS: ug/L 



Coaioound 


Inicia 


I Calib. 


1 


Continuing* Calibration* 








Mecals: 


True Value 


Found 


ZR 


True Value 


Found 2R 


Found 


"I 


Mechod c J 




1 . Alumi nuc 










1 




Z. Ancioonv 


i 
1 




















i 
j. Arsenic 




















(• . tSa r ium 






















5. Eery 11 fun 










j 








o. Cadmiua 












1 






7. Calciua | 






; 


1 ! '' 






B. Cnro.Tiiua 


i 








1 ■ 
1 


■■ 








"*. Cobalc 






















1U. Cooper 








i 


1 1 






11. Iron 




















12. Lead 










1 








i'J. Haknesiu: 


1 ! 
















I '• . .".a n * a n e s e 1 




1 i 




! 


13. Kcrcury 






i 












lo. Nic'*el 








i 








i 




17. Hocassiunl 








1 






i 




lo. Selenium | 




















IV. Silver 


1 






1L 


1 1 i 


1 1 








• 


1 i 


i 




I 




i . 


t 



^u 



bod l ura 



£.1 . Tha 1 1 i u.-i 



Vamd iu* 



3 . Zinc I 



ut t.c r : 



■ y an t cc 



I I 



I 11 JL 



!! 



initial (.iloration Source 



iiCl'»uin»; L.ilibr.lClOi SOvifCC 



l"Otcu- An,! ytic.it ncchod llr.cd: I" - I C •" . a - rl.m-- aa; f - Kum.icc A/\ 



LAB NArt£ 
UATL" 



^* C. Report So. 
BLANKS 



CASE NO. 
UNITi 





Inicial 
Call brae ion 
Blank Value 


Continuing Calibration 


1 


Preparation BlanV- 




Compound 


Blank Value 
I 2 3 


Macrix : 


Matrix: 
2 








I 




fA. c a i s : 
1 - Aluminuff. 










•' 








2. Ancimony 


J^ 














3. Arsenic 
















i*. barium 
















b. Beryllium 
















b. Cadciuro 
















7. Calciura 
















8. Chrooiura 
















9. Cobalt 
















LU . C030* r 
















II. Iron 1 1 












... 1 1 
i i. . Lead 


I i 




i 

1 






I J. Mazrusiun 
















14. Hinuancsc 


1 














1 b . Mercury 










■ • 




lb. Nickel 1 














1 7 . ',' o c 3 s s i u si 1 


l 

| 


J- i 






Is. S« Lcn i u.^> 






1 i 




i 


i 


i "> . Si lv C r 






1 








Zu. Sodiura 






i 




1 




<J t . Tna 1 I iun« 


i 






l 


J 





11. Zinc 



uct^c r 



Cyan : <2c 






L 



te|ii>riin|2 U'Mii; jg,ucous. uri /L; solid mii/v^ 



Revision: Final 
Date: January 15, 1998 
Section: 6 
Page 10 of 15 



SAMPLING AND ANALYTICAL Methodology References 
(Sampling and Analytical) 

Annual Book of ASTM Standards . Part 31, Water, 1980. 

Annual Book of ASTM Standard s, Part 31, Water, 1979. 

The Determination of Polvchlorinated Biphenyls in Transformer Fluid 
and Waste Oils , Physical and Chemical Methods Branch, U.S. EPA 
EMSL, Cincinnati, OH, April 1981. 

Federal Register . 40 CFR 136, U.S. EPA EMSL, Cincinnati, OH, 
December 3, 1979. 

Federal Register , 40 CFR 261, Appendices I-III, U.S. EPA EMSL, 
Cincinnati, OH, pp 422-429. 

Good Laboratory Practice Standards , 40 CFR 792, pp 453-458. 

Handbook for Analytical Quality Control in Water and Wastewater 
Laboratories . U.S. EPA-600/4-79-019 , March 1979. 

Interim Guidelines and Specifications for Preparing Quality 
Assurance Project Plans , QAMS-005/80, December 29, 1980. 

Sevenson Environmental, Technical Services Field Guidance Manual , 
Volume I, 1st edition, November 1993. 

Manual of Analytical Methods , prepared by Pesticides and Toxic 
Substances Effects Laboratory, Analyses of Pesticide Residues in 
Human and Environmental Samples, December 1974. 

Manual of Analytical Quality Control for Pesticides in Human and 
Environmental Media . U.S. EPA-600/1-76-017 . 

Manual for Analytical Quality Control for Pesticides and Related 
Compounds in Human and Environmental Samples , U.S. 
EPA-600/1-79-008. 

Methods for Benzidine, Chlorinated Organic Compounds, 

Pentachlorophenol , and Pesticides in Water and Wastewater , U.S. EPA 
EMSL, Cincinnati, OH, September 1978. 

Methods for Chemical Analysis of Water and Wastes , U.S. 
EPA-600/4-79-020, revised as of March 1983. 

Microbiological Methods for Monitoring the Environment, Water, and 
Waste , U.S. EPA-600/8-78-017 , EMSL, December 1978. 

Occupational Safety and Health Guidance Manual for Hazardous Waste 
Site Activities . NIOSH/OSHA/USCG/EPA, October 1985. 



I > 



I# 



Revision: Final 
Date: January 15, 1998 
Section: 6 
Page 11 of 15 



Sampling and Analysis Methods for Hazardous Waste Combustion . 
EPA-600/8-84-002. 

Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater , 18th 
edition, APHA, 1992. 

Technical Assistance Document for Sampling and Analysis of Toxic 
Organic Compounds in Ambient Air. EPA-600/4-83-027 . 

Test Methods for Evaluating Solid Waste. Physical/Chemical Methods . 
Waste Characterization Branch, Office of Solid Waste, U.S. EPA, 
Washington, DC, 3rd Edition, September, 1986, SW-846. 

U.S. EPA Approved Methods for Sampling and Analysis of Solid Waste . 
1982. 

Interim Guidelines and Specification for Preparing Quality 
Assurance Project Plans . QAMS-005/80 Office of Monitoring Systems 
and QA, Office of Research and Development, USEPA, Washington, DC, 
December 29, 1980. 

Quality Assurance Handbook of Air Pollution Measurement Systems , 
USEPA 600/9-76-005, December 1984. 



^^AJE *i -AmAOTSIS MCTHOCS FO« OnOAX»C 
CH£>jBCAi-S COKTAJHeD W SW-846 




Table 4 — AKAtrsts MCTveoa for OaOAj«c 
Ck&ocaijs CowTAJsea w SW-8-iS — Contin- 
ued 



LOJTPOU^d 







"a8L£ 5— AsauySIS McTHOOS "OR InQRGANK; 

Chemicals Contained is SW-^Xo 



frn 




S r.-«e . 



: w | 


rc*a. 


7Z*\ 


i Si 1 


;xcj. 


rco 


i tz 1 


roea. 


rc«! 


I SJ ! 


;cw. 


rat 


:* 1 


•*!*3. 


.': it 


i-^-i 1 


■" I • J . 


Tl>l. 


S*/ | 




mr 


•■5*1 


r*ro. 


T*2l 


sir | 


;«fo. 


7*n 


:i* i 


m;j 


rj;r 


1 13 | 


;:to 


r?«t 


: .Vi : 


/' . v.- 


•" « •** * 



'oOU Or^fcOC 



1 44 

J 4T 



V310 
3C?3 
3CXJ 



£rnrtroow «nfq> 



Protection Agency 



TABLE 6 

METHOD DETECTION LIMIT (MDL) 
FOR VARIOUS ANALYTES IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES 



PAKAWg-TE* 
Purgcablcs 

Sate/McviTrala 

Acids 

r a anoch I or i ne 
Prttlcid«/PC5 

Pheroxy Herbicides og/l 



Total Organic 
K4lojcn CCX) 



rrihjlomethirtes (IHM) 



i ox in 



P-jrjeable 
Kalocarbons 

CM ci =icT 
f luor idei 
Jul f ate* 
Total 
Alkalinity 

to pH 4..S 
C irSoratc 

Alkalinity 

to p* a. 3 

3ic*rborv*(« 
Atkal ini tf 
to pH 4.S 

Xy-ir o«id« 

Alkalinity 
«i trat« • M 
*ltr»te» - x 
Totil Cation* 
Tot «l Arvi orij 

».OtPCMEMS!2: 

Crote *,!pha 

Cro«« let* 

t*d(ua 22a 
«»diu«i 223 





OETECTtCM 




U*|TS 


umi 


«{IHCO 


u«j/l 


t 


Pmtt« I Tr»p GC/nS 
H Or* 


ug/1 


10 


Extraction/ CC/XS 
7 drft/iO <t*y% 


og/l 


10 


Extraction/ CC/XS 
7 d-tyi/iO day* 


og/1 


o.ot 


Extract i on/CC/EG) 


ug/1 


10 


tttractlon/CC/XS 
7 cUtj/W d»r* 



<J7/t 



og/l 
u-j/t 



u»j/t 



-9/1 

ng/1 
rg/l 



"9/1 



«J/1 



«3/1 

"7/1 
"7/1 
*«J/1 

**e<i/ t 
«*e<V 1 



o.ot 



o.ocs 



0.01 



0.1 
10 



10 



10 



13 

13 
0.1 
0.C1 
C.I 
0.1 



Extract ion/ CC/IC3 
7 d«y«/Cl Or* 

Absorption/ 
Colometric 
U drft 

Extract! crJZCJfZi 
Purge i Tr»p CC/MS 
K Or* 

Ejttraction/CC/HS/ 
SO 

Pva-je I Tnp/CC/ 

m.u u car* 



Titrinetric 

ElectrocW 

Turbidir«tric 



tl trir»etric 



f i trioetric 



f i t ri oe t r i c 

ntrl«*trie 
Color«p%«{ric 
Calor»«*trle 
Cilcul at (on 
Ctlcul «t ion 



pCi/l 


0.' 


Proportional 
Couit«r 


pCI/1 


0.1 


Proportional 
Counter 


pCl/1 


0.1 


Counter 


pCI/1 


0.1 


Count er 



TABLE 6 
CALYXES IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES 



* 



Mt**rrr^ 


- 


orrfcrjo* 




tnutj 


U*fT -X" 


EXJJSB. 


TUCK KETAlx 








Atoalnu* 










-9/1 


0.2 


1CV 


A/ttlattny 


•9/1 
•9/1 


1 


AA-Ht_« 




0.002 


AjWutt»c # 


Xmente 


■C/l 


0_5 


lev 


lM-fua 


•9/1 

•9/1 


0.004 
0.05 


ICV 


• tryltlu, 


•9/1 


0.0OO1 


AA-M»_ 


loron 


•9/1 


O.OCOl 


lev 


CxlallM 


•9/1 


0.31 


:ev 




•9/1 


o.oca 


lev 




■9/J 


o.o : 


fA'flmmm 


Cipoadn 


•9/1 
•9/1 


0.001 

o.cz 


lev 




■9/1 


0.01 


M-/l_ 


Cafc.lt 


■9/1 
•9/1 


0.0C3 
0.01 


lev 


C=PP<r 


•9/1 
•9/1 


0.01 

o.cz 


AA-Ajrr»^« 

:ev 


Iron 


•9/1 
•9/1 
-9/1 


0.01 

o.cc-s 

0.C3 


AA-furrwc* 

:ev 


(.cad 


•9/1 
•9/1 
•9/1 
"5/1 
•9/1 
•9/1 
•5/1 


0.05 

o.oc-c 


aa-m«-« 

AA-furr\*c* 




0.C5 
0.01 
0.01 


AA-ftMM 

lev 


*»lybdcnu. 


0.0CC5 

0.01 


Csld Y»por 

iev 




•9/1 


o.c: 


rev 


^-«tenl»_r« 


■9/1 
-9/1 
-9/1 
r*/l 
-1/1 


o.cs 


AA-rtMM, 




o.ocz 

o.zs 

0.01 


:ev 

AA-M— » 


Tin 


3. or*. 


Ija,. 


Htknu, 


•9/1 


0.2 


lev 


^lo, 


•9/1 
•9/1 


0.01 


:ev 


TtterCC.^ 


o.ot 


lev 


:tnc- 


•9/1 
•9/1 
-9/1 


0.0C5 

o.oi 

0.01 


tev 
tev 

AJWt—« 


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13 


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-9/1 


13 


130C 


Satfda 


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la 




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1 


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0( l ~* c^.. 


-9/1 
-9/1 
•9/1 
-«/l 
-9/1 
-«/l 


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5 



TABLE 6 

METHOD DETECTION LIMIT (MDL) 
FOR VARIOUS ANALYTES IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES 

ornate* 



• 



ntA*gT» imm LlfllJ. pfTnCP 

rhcnola *9/t 

frcal Coltfora c/100 

Total Geltfooa c/100 

■ comIcm *j/J 
IcsldtMl 

Qilorin* *g/| 

MCJU. Oircmitn *4/1 

Color units 

Ma 



«• C*fO- ag/t 

Sulfide* ao/t 

K4AS no/1 

Turbidity rru 



0.005 


ColoraMtrle 





H— bona filter 





H«— brarM filter 


0.1 


ColoraMtrle 


0.5 


ColoraMtrle 


0.02 


ColoraMtrle 


5 


ColoraMtrle 


10 


Calculation 


0.025 


ColoraMtrle 


0.1 


ColoraMtrle 


0.1 


TurbldlaMtrlc 



•Lisit" is the nominal detection lisxit vhich ±3 achievable with the listed 
aethod. Interferences in- specific saaples cay result in a higher detection 
Linit. Concentration procedures say also result in lover limits. 



• > 



Revision: Final 
Date: January 15, 1998 
Section: 7 
Page 1 of 2 



7.0 ANALYTICAL PROCEDURES 



Treated range samples collected during field operations for the MMR 
Site will be analyzed by the following lab for TCLP lead. 

Waste Stream Technology 
302 Grote St. 
Buffalo, NY 14302 
Attn: Dr. James Hyzy 



7.1 LABORATORY ANALYSIS 

The subcontract laboratories are required to comply with QA 2 

objectives for the parameters of interest and provide the data 

along with appropriate QA/QC documentation within specified turn 
around times for each parameter. 

Each SOP is developed in the same manner from its USEPA Method 
specifying the following as given in the EPA SW-846. 

o procedures for sample preparation; 

o instrument start-up and performance check; 

o procedures to establish the actual and required detection 
limits for each parameter; 

o initial and continuing calibration check requirements; 

o specific methods for each sample matrix type; and 

o required analyses and QC acceptance limits for method 
blanks, trip blanks (as appropriate), field blanks, 
matrix spikes, matrix spike duplicates, and laboratory 
control samples (USEPA or National Bureau of Standards 
(NBS) reference samples or laboratory prepared 
blank/spikes) . 



Revision: Final 
Date: January 15, 1998 
Section: 7 
Page 2 of 2 



7.2 FIELD SCREENING ANALYTICAL PROTOCOLS 

The procedures for field measurement of TCLP lead will be 
described in the QA/QC plan for mobile lab on site. The mobile 
laboratory in the field follows USEPA approved methods and 
analytical protocols for all analysis. Unless otherwise notified 
by the client or the overseeing PO, Sevenson uses SW-846, 3rd 
edition, methods and QA/QC guidelines. Any deviations from these 
USEPA approved procedures will be recorded and brought to the 
attention of NGB. 



7.3 LABORATORY PROCEDURES 

A list of analytical methodology references are given in Section 
6.0 of this document. 



> 



Revision : 1 

Date: January 15, 1998 

Section: 8 

Page 1 of 2 



8.0 INTERNAL QUALITY CONTROL CHECKS 

Two types of quality assurance will be used by both Waste Stream 
and the Sevenson Mobile Laboratory to ensure the production of 
analytical data of known and documented usable quality are as 
follows: quality assurance program and quality control checks. 

8. 1 OA Program 

Both laboratories have a written Quality Assurance/Quality Control 
program which provides rules and guidelines to ensure the 
reliability and validity of work conducted at the laboratory. 
Compliance with the QA/QC program is coordinated and monitored by 
both laboratories' Quality Assurance Unit (QAU) , which is 
independent of the operating departments. 

The stated objectives of the laboratory QA/QC Program are to: 

o Ensure that all procedures are documented, including any 
changes in administrative and/or technical procedures. 

o Ensure that all analytical procedures are conducted 
according to sound scientific principles and have been 
validated. 

o Monitor the performance of the laboratory by a systemic 
inspection program and provide for a corrective action as 
necessary. 

o Collaborate with other laboratories in establishing 
quality levels, as appropriate. 

o Ensure that all data are properly recorded and archived. 

All laboratory procedures are documented in writing as either 
Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) or Method Procedures (MP) which 
are edited and controlled by the QAU. Internal quality control 
procedures for analytical services will be conducted by both 
laboratories in accordance with their standard operating procedures 
and the individual method requirements in a manner consistent with 
EPA Test Methods for Evaluating Solid Waste Physical and Chemical 
Methods (EPA-SW84 6) for inorganics analytical methods. Both the 
mobile lab and the subcontracted lab will be responsible for DQO 
Level 2 objectives (QA2) according to DQO Level 2. 

8.2 Quality Control Checks 

These specifications include the types of audits required (sample 
spikes, matrix spikes, standard check, reference samples, controls, 
and reagent blanks) , the frequency of each audit, the compounds to 
be used for sample spikes and matrix spikes, and the quality 
control acceptance criteria for these audits. 



9 



Revision : 1 

Date: January 15, 1998 

Section: 8 

Page 2 of 2 



Both laboratories will document, in each data package provided, 
that both initial and ongoing instrument and analytical QC 
functions have been met. Any samples analyzed in non-conformance 
with the QC criteria will be reanalyzed by the laboratory, if 
sufficient sample volume is available. It is expected that 
sufficient volume of samples will be collected for reanalyses. 

A minimum of five standards will be used to calibrate the Atomic 
Absorption instruments for both laboratories. Each lab will be 
required to analyze by spiking at least 8 replicate samples whose 
analyte concentrations are equal to the level of interest. (Do 
this by collecting one sample with sufficient material to divide 
into the required number of replicates and homogenize the sample 
thoroughly before dividing into replicates.) These samples are 
from the selected site and contain the target analyte at or near 
the level of interest. 

Sample spikes and duplicates will be run on 10% of all samples 
collected by the mobile lab. Also, 10% of all samples analyzed by 
the mobile laboratory will be sent to the subcontracted laboratory 
for confirmation. Method blanks will be run on 10% of all samples 
analyzed. Standard checks and blanks will be run on 10% of all 
samples analyzed. Standard checks must be within 90% to 110% of 
the mean value. The control limits for spike recovery is 80% to 
120%. 

An audit of both laboratories may be completed by Sevenson's QA/QC 
coordinator prior to project set-up. The subcontractor's 
laboratory QA manual will also be audited and kept on file at 
Sevenson's Midwest Division. 



Revision: Final 
Date: January 15, 1998 
Section: 9 
Page 1 of 3 



• 



9.0 DATA REDUCTION, VALIDATION AND REPORTING 



9.1 FIELD MEASUREMENTS AND SAMPLE COLLECTION 

Raw data from field measurements and sample collection activities 
will be appropriately recorded in the field log book. If the data 
are to be used in the project reports, they will be reduced and 
summarized. The method of reduction will be documented in the 
report. 

9.2 LABORATORY SERVICES 

Subcontracted laboratories will perform in-house analytical 
data reduction and validation under the direction of the Laboratory 
QA Officer. The Laboratory QA Officer is responsible for assessing 
data quality and advising of any data which were rated 
"preliminary" or "unacceptable" or other notations which would 
caution the data user of possible unreliability. Data reduction, 
validation, and reporting by each laboratory will be conducted as 
follows: 

o Raw data produced by the analyst is turned over to the 
respective area supervisor; in this case the project 
chemist. 

o The area supervisor reviews the data for attainment of 
quality control criteria as outlined in this QAPjP and 
for overall reasonableness. 

o Upon acceptance of the raw data by the project chemist, 
a computerized report is generated and sent to the 
designated QA/QC Coordinator. 

o The QA/QC coordinator will complete a thorough audit of 
reports at a frequency of one in ten, and an audit of 
every report for consistency and completeness. 

o The QA/QC Coordinator and the Project Chemist will decide 
whether any sample reanalysis is required. 

o Upon acceptance of the preliminary reports by the QA/QC 
Coordinator, final reports will be generated and signed 
by the Laboratory Project Manager. The laboratory 
package shall be presented in the same order in which the 
samples were analyzed. 

Data reduction reporting procedures will be those specified in the 
QA/QC Plan for the MMR Site. 

Both laboratories will prepare and retain full analytical and QC 
documentation similar to that required by the Contract Laboratory 
Program. Such retained documentation need not be hard (paper) 
copy, but may be in other storage media (e.g.., magnetic tape) . As 



c 



> 



9 



Revision: Final 
Date: January 15, 1998 
Section: 9 
Page 2 of 3 



needed, both laboratories will supply hard copy of the retained 
information. 

Both laboratories will report the data in the same chronological 
order in which it analyses along with QC data. Both laboratories 
will provide the following information to the prime Contractor in 
each analytical data package submitted: 

1. Cover sheets listing the samples included in the report 
and narrative comments describing problems encountered in 
analysis. 

2. Tabulated results of inorganic and organic compounds 
identified and quantified. 

3. Analytical results for QC sample spikes, sample 
duplicates, initial and a continuous calibration 
verifications of standards and blanks, standard 
procedural blanks, laboratory control samplers and ICP 
interference check samples. 

4. Tabulation of instrument detection limits determined in 
pure water. 

5 Raw data system printouts (or legible photocopies) 
identifying 

date of analyses, analyst, parameters determined, 
calibration curve, calibration verifications, method 
blanks, sample and any dilutions, sample duplicates, 
spikes and control samples. 

Sevenson's assessment will be accomplished by the joint efforts of 
the Project Chemist and Project Manager. The data assessment by 
the Project Manager will be based on the criteria that the sample 
was properly collected and handled according to the Sampling and 
Analysis Plan and Section 5 of this QAPjP. 

Sevenson's QA/QC director will conduct a systematic review of the 
data for compliance with the established QC criteria based on the 
spike, duplicate and blank results provided by the laboratory as 
well as sample holding time is evidenced by the chain-of -custody . 
An evaluation of data accuracy, precision, sensitivity and 
completeness, based on criteria in Section 12, will be performed 
and presented in report. 

The Data Review will identify any out-of-control data points and 
data omissions and interact with the laboratory to correct data 
deficiencies. Decisions to repeat sample collection and analyses 
may be made by the Project Manager based on the extent of the 
deficiencies and their importance in the overall context of the 
project. 



<> 



Revision: Final 
Date: January 15, 1998 
Section: 9 
Page 3 of 3 



All data generated for the MMR Site will be computerized 
chronologically in a format organized to facilitate data review and 
evaluation. The computerized data set will include the data flags 
provided by subcontracted laboratories (in accordance with the 
Laboratory Data Validation Functional Guidelines for Inorganic 
Analyses (July 1988) , as well as additional comments of the Data 
Reviewer. The laboratory-provided data flags will include such 
items as: 1) concentration below required detection limit, 2) 
estimated concentration due to poor below required detection limit, 
2) estimated concentration due to poor spike recovery, and 3) 
concentration of chemical also found in laboratory blank. 

The Data Reviewer comments will indicate that the data are: 1) 
usable as a quantitative concentration, 2) usable with caution as 
an estimated concentration, or 3) unusable due to out-of-control QC 
results. 

The analytical data generated during operations at MMR Site will be 
available for controlled access by the Project Manager, and 
authorized personnel. The complete data set will be incorporated 
into the final project report. 



i > 



Revision: Final 
Date: January 15, 1998 
Section: 10 
Page 1 of 1 



10.0 PERFORMANCE AND SYSTEM AUDITS 

The internal performance and system audits of laboratory (ies) 
will be conducted by Sevenson's QA/QC Director. The system 
audits, which is done on an annual basis, will include 
examination laboratory documentation on sample receiving, sample 
log-in, sample storage, chain of custody procedure, sample 
preparation and analysis, instrument operating records, etc. The 
performance audits are conducted on a quarterly basis. Blind QC 
samples will be prepared and submitted along with project samples 
to the laboratory for analysis throughout the project. 
Sevenson's QA/QC Director will evaluate the analytical results of 
these blind performance samples to ensure the laboratories 
maintain a good performance. 

External performance and system audits of the laboratories 
selected for the project for approval/disapproval will be 
conducted by Sevenson's QA/QC Director. 



Revision: Final 
Date: January 15, 1998 
Section: 11 
Page 1 of 1 



11.0 PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE PROCEDURES 



11.1 FIELD EQUIPMENT /INSTRUMENTS 

The field equipment for this project includes Buck Scientific 
Atomic Absorption spectrophotometer, thermometers, pH meter, 
sonicator, TCLP tumbler and filtration device and conductivity 
meter. Specific preventative maintenance procedures to be 
followed for field equipment are those recommended by the 
manufacturer . 

Field instruments will be checked and calibrated in the Warehouse 
before they are shipped or carried to the field. These 
instruments will be checked and calibrated daily before use. 
Calibration checks will be performed after every 10 samples and 
will be documented. 

Critical spare parts such as tapes, papers, pH probes, electrodes 
and batteries will be kept on-site to minimize instrument down 
time. Backup instruments and equipment will be available on-site 
or within one-day shipment to avoid delays in the field schedule. 



11.2 LABORATORY INSTRUMENTS 

As part of the QA/QC Program, a routine preventative maintenance 
program is conducted by subcontract lab to minimize the 
occurrence of instrument failure and other system malfunctions. 
Subcontract lab has an internal group to perform routine 
scheduled maintenance, and to repair or to coordinate with the 
vendor for the repair of all instruments. All laboratory 
instruments are maintained in accordance with manufacturer's 
specifications and the requirements of the specific method 
employed. This maintenance is carried out on a regular, 
scheduled basis, and is documented in the laboratory instrument 
service logbook for each instrument. Emergency repair or 
scheduled manufacture's maintenance is provided under a repair 
and maintenance contract with factory representatives. 

A routine preventive maintenance log of the subcontract 
laboratory will be checked out during the routine audit by 
Sevenson's QA/QC coordinator. 



• > 



9 



Revision: Final 
Date: January 15, 1998 
Section: 12 
Page 1 of 2 



12.0 SPECIFIC ROUTINE PROCEDURES TO ASSESS DATA PRECISION, 
ACCURACY, AND COMPLETENESS 



12.1 FIELD MEASUREMENTS 

Field data will be assessed by the site Project Chemist. The 
site Project Chemist will review the field results for compliance 
with the established QC criteria that are specified in the QAPjP 
and Work Plan. Accuracy of the field measurements will be 
assessed using daily instrument calibration, calibration check,, 
and analysis of blanks. Precision will be assess on the basis of 
reproducibility by multiple reading of a single sample. Data 
completeness will be calculated as follows: 

Valid Data Obtained 

Completeness = X 100 

Total Data Planned 



12.2 LABORATORY DATA 

Laboratory results will be assessed for compliance with required 
precision, accuracy, completeness and sensitivity as follows: 

12.2.1 Precision 

Precision of laboratory analysis will be assessed by 
comparing the analytical results between matrix spike/matrix 
spike duplicate (MS/MSD) for organic analysis, and laboratory 
duplicate analyses for inorganic analysis. The relative percent 
difference (%RPD) will be calculated for each pair of duplicate 
analysis using the following formula: 



%RPD= X 100 

(S + D) /2 

Where: S = First sample value (original or MS value) 

D = Second sample value (duplicate or MSD value) 

12.2.2 Accuracy 

Accuracy of laboratory results will be assessed for compliance 
with the established QC criteria that are described in Section 
III of the QAPjP using the analytical results of method blanks, 
reagent/ preparation blank, matrix spike/matrix spike duplicate 
samples, field blank, and bottle blanks. The percent recovery 



< > 



Revision: Final 
Date: January 15, 1998 
Section: 12 
Page 2 of 2 



(%R) of matrix spike samples will be calculated using the 
equation below: 



;R= 



A - B 



X100 



Equ. 12-3 



Where: 



A = The analyte concentration determined 
experimentally from the spiked sample; 

B = The background level determined by a 

separate analysis of the unspiked sample 
and; 

C = The amount of the spike added. 



12.2.3 Completeness 

The data completeness of laboratory analyses results will be 
assessed for compliance with the amount of data required for 
decision making. The completeness is expressed as per cent valid 
data obtained as a fraction of total data planned. 



12.2.4 Sensitivity 

The achievement of method detection limits depend on instrumental 
sensitivity and matrix effects. Therefore it is important to 
monitor the instrumental sensitivity to ensure the data quality 
through constant instrument performance. The instrumental 
sensitivity will be monitored through the analysis of method 
blank, calibration check sample, and laboratory control samples. 



9 



Revision: 

Date: August 24, 1994 

Section: 13 

Page 1 of 3 



» 



13.0 CORRECTIVE ACTIONS 

Corrective actions may be required for two classes of problems: 
(i) analytical and equipment problems and ( ii) noncompliance 
problems. Analytical and equipment problems may occur during 
sampling and sample handling, sample preparation, laboratory 
instrumental analysis, and data review. 

For noncompliance problems, a formal corrective action program 
will be determined and implemented at the time the problem is 
identified. The person who identifies the problem is responsible 
for notifying the Site Supervisor. If the problem is analytical 
in nature, information on these problems will be promptly 
communicated to the U.S. EPA, Quality Assurance Section. 
Implementation of corrective action will be confirmed in writing 
through the same channels. 

Any nonconformance with the established quality control 
procedures in the QAPjP will be identified and corrected. 

Corrective actions will be implemented and documented in the 
field record book. No staff member will initiate corrective 
action without prior communication of findings through the proper 
channels. If corrective actions are insufficient, work may be 
stopped by stop-work order by the SS on site. 

13. 1 SAMPLE COLLECTION/FIELD MEASUREMENTS 

Technical staff and project chemist will be responsible for 
reporting all suspected technical or QA nonconformances or 
suspected deficiencies of any activity or issued document by 
reporting the situation to the Site Supervisor. This manager 
will be responsible for assessing the suspected problems in 
consultation with the Project Manager on making a decision based 
on the potential for the situation to impact the quality of the 
data. If it is determined that the situation warrants a 
reportable nonconformance requiring corrective action, then a 
nonconformance report will be initiated by the Project Manager. 

The Project manager will be responsible for ensuring that 
corrective action for nonconformances are initiated by: 

o evaluating all reported nonconformances; 

o controlling additional work on nonconforming items; 

o determining disposition or action to be taken; 

o maintaining a log of nonconformances; 

o reviewing nonconformance reports and corrective actions taken; 



Revision: 

Date: August 24, 1994 

Section: 13 

Page 2 of 3 



• 



o ensuring nonconformance reports are included in the final site 
documentation in project files. 

If appropriate, the Site Supervisor will ensure that no 
additional work that is dependent on the nonconforming activity 
is performed until the corrective actions are completed. 

Corrective action for field measurements may include: 

Repeat the measurement to check the error; 

Check for all proper adjustments for ambient 

conditions such as temperature; 

Check the batteries; 

Re-Calibration; 

Check the calibration; 

Replace the instrument or measurement devices; 

Stop work (if necessary). 

The Site Supervisor is responsible for all site activities. In 
this role, the Site Supervisor at times is required to adjust the 
site programs to accommodate site specific needs. When it 
becomes necessary to modify a program, the responsible person 
notifies the Site Supervisor of the anticipated change and 
implements the necessary changes after obtaining the approval of 
the Site Supervisor. The change in the program will be 
documented on the field change request (FCR) that will be signed 
by the initiators and the Team Leader. The FCR for each document 
will be numbered serially as required. The FCR shall be attached 
to the file copy of the affected document. The Site Supervisor 
must approve the change in writing or verbally prior to field 
implementation , if feasible. If unacceptable, the action taken 
during the period of deviation will be evaluated in order to 
determine the significance of any departure from established 
program practices and action taken. 

The Site Supervisor for the MMR site is responsible for the 
controlling, tracking, and implementation of the identified 
changes. Reports on all changes will be distributed to all 
affected parties which include the NGB. 



13.2 LABORATORY ANALYSES 

LABORATORY CORRECTIVE ACTION MAY INCLUDE: 

Re-analyzing the samples, when holding time 

criteria permits; 

Resampling and . analyzing; 

Evaluating and amending sampling procedures and/or 

Evaluating and amending analytical 
procedures; and/or, 



« 



> 



Revision: 

Date: August 24, 1994 

Section: 13 

Page 3 of 3 



Accepting data and acknowledging the level of 
uncertainty. 

If resampling is deemed necessary due to laboratory problems, the 
PO & SS must identify the necessary approach including cost 
recovery from the subcontract laboratory for the additional 
sampling effort. 

Corrective actions are required whenever an out-of-control event 
or potential out-of-control event is noted. The investigative 
action taken is somewhat dependent on the analysis and the event. 

Laboratory personnel are alerted that corrective actions may be 
necessary if: 

o QC data are outside the warning or acceptable windows for 
precision and accuracy; 

o Blanks contain target analytes above acceptable levels; 

o Undesirable trends are detected in spike recoveries or RPD 
between duplicates; 

o There are unusual changes in detection limits; 

o Deficiencies are detected by the QA Department during 
internal or external audits or from the results of 
performance evaluation samples; or 

o Inquiries concerning data quality are received. 

Corrective action procedures are often handled by the Project 
Chemist at the bench level, who reviews the preparation or 
extraction procedure for possible errors, checks the instrument 
calibration, spike and calibration mixes, instrument sensitivity, 
and so on. If the problem persists or cannot be identified, the 
matter is referred to the laboratory supervisor, manager and/or 
QA department for further investigation. Once resolved, full 
documentation of the corrective action procedure is filed with 
the QA department. 



• 



« 



> 



Revision: Final 

Date: January 15, 1998 

Section: 14 

Page 1 of 1 



14.0 QUALITY ASSURANCE REPORTS TO MANAGEMENT 

In addition to the audit reports submitted to the NGB PO in 
accordance with QAPjP Section 12, a progress report will be 
prepared by the Project Manager, addressing all Quality Assurance 
issues. It will contain QA sections that summarize data quality 
information collected during the removal work on-site. 

Daily report will be made to the Site Supervisor by the Project 
Chemist giving an oral report of completeness of analytical work 
and the status of any problems that occurred. 

Written daily and weekly reports will be made to Sevenson's QA/QC 
Coordinator expressing the status of the site project with a copy 
of all mobile laboratory data analyzed. 

The QA/QC Coordinator will be responsible for QA/QC data review 
and status reports. The data reports will show assessment of 
data accuracy, completeness and precision. The status reports 
will show results of performance and system audits and corrective 
action taken on any infraction or invalidation. 



JF 



m 



WASTE STREAM TECHNOLOGY INC. 

ANALYTICAL LABORATORY 

QUALITY ASSURANCE 

AND 

QUALITY CONTROL PLAN 



♦ 



Revision Number 



Serial Number: QA" ®H% 



Prepared by: 

UUdSTE STREAKl 




302 Grote Street 
Buffalo, NY 14207 



This document is the sole property of Waste Stream Technology 
Inc. Duplication of this document is strictly prohibited without 
the expressed written consent of Waste Stream Technology Inc. 



Section : TOC 

Issue Date : 1/24/96 

Page No. : 1 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

POL POLICY STATEMENT 

ROR RECORD OF REVISION 

1.0 INTRODUCTION 

1.1 General Description 

1.2 Objectives 

1.3 Implementation 

1.4 Amendments and Revisions 

2.0 ORGANIZATION AND RESPONSIBILITIES 

2.1 Organizational Chart 

2.2 Responsibilities 

2.3 Training of Laboratory Personnel 

3 .0 SAMPLE CUSTODY 

3.1 Field Collection by Waste Stream Personnel 

3.2 Collection from an Outside Agency 

3.3 Sample Receipt 

3.4 Custody in the Laboratory 

3.5 Sample Disposal 

3.6 Sample Security 

4.0 ANALYTICAL PROCEDURES 

4.1 Statement of Procedures 

4.2 Quality Assurance Objectives 

4.2.1 Accuracy 

4.2.2 Precision 

4.2.3 Comparability 

4.2.4 Completeness 

4.2.5 Reagents , Solvents, Water , Glassware and Gases 

4.3 Quality Assurance and Quality Control 

4.3.1 Standard Preparation 

4.3.2 Determination of Detection Limits 

4.3.2.1 Instrument Detection Limit 

4.3.2.2 Method Detection Limit 

4.3.2.3 Quantitation Limits 

4.3.2.4 Conversion of Detection Limits to 
Minimum Detectable Concentration 

4.3.2.5 Documentation of Detection Limits 






x 



r 



Section : TOC 

Issue Date : 1/24/96 

Page No. : 2 

4.3.3 Instrument Calibration 

4.3.3.1 Initial Calibration 

4.3.3.2 Continuing Calibration 

4.3.4 Analysis of Quality Control Samples 

4.3.4.1 Blanks 

4.3.4.1.1 Reagent Blank 

4.3.4.1.2 Method Blank 

4.3.4.2 Spiked Blank 

4.3.4.3 Spiked Sample 

4.3.4.4 Duplicate Sample 

4.3.4.5 Matrix Spike Duplicate Sample 

4.3.4.6 Documentation of Quality Control 
Analyses 

4.3.5 Establishment of Acceptance Criteria 

4.3.5.1 Method Blanks 

4.3.5.2 Recovery of Spiked Blank Samples 

4.3.5.3 Duplicate Analyses 

4.3.5.4 Spiked Sample Analyses 

4.3.5.5 Use of Surrogates 

4.3.5.6 Retention Times in Gas 
Chromatography Methods 

4.3.6 Standard Operating Procedures 

4.4 QA/QC Schedules 

4.4.1 Non-Instrumental Wet Chemistry Analyses 

4.4.2 Instrumental Analyses 

4.4.2.1 Non-GC Instrumental Analyses 

4.4.2.2 GC and GC/MS Analyses 

4.5 Instrumentation 

4.6 Audits 

4.6.1 External Audits 

4.6.2 System Audits 

4.6.3 Report Audit 

4.6.4 Blind Sample Audit 

5.0 DATA HANDLING 

5.1 Record Keeping in the Laboratory 

5.1.1 Sample Preparation Log Sheets 

5.1.2 Wet Chemistry Logbooks 

5.1.3 Record Keeping in Instrumental Analysis 

5.2 Data Reduction 

5.3 Data Validation 

5.4 Final reporting 

5.5 QA Records 



uwsnsntoin 



* 



Section : TOC 

Issue Date : 1/24/96 

Page No. : 3 

6.0 CORRECTIVE ACTIONS, PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE, AND INSTRUMENT 
MAINTENANCE LOGS 

6.1 Identification and Documentation of Problems 

6.2 Problems and Actions 

6.2.1 Continuing Calibration Outside Acceptance 
Limits 

6.2.2 Calibration Standards Exceeding the Permitted 
Holding Time 

6.2.3 Laboratory Method Blanks Exceed Method 
Detection Limit but Are Below Quantitation 
Limit 

6.2.4 Laboratory Method Blank Exceeds Quantitation 
Limits 

6.2.5 Reference Sample Exhibits Recoveries Outside 
Acceptance Limits 

6.2.6 Surrogates and Sample Spikes Exhibit 
Recoveries Outside Acceptance Limits 

6.2.7 Control Chart Exhibits a Regular Trend 

6.3 Preventive Maintenance 

6.4 Instrument Maintenance Logs 

7.0 BIOGRAPHIES OF KEY PERSONNEL 



It 



uwsnsn*£dm 



" 



' 



Section : TOC 

Issue Date : 1/24/96 

Page No. : 4 

LIST OF FIGURES 

Abbreviated Organization Chart Figure 2-1 

Analytical Laboratory Organization Chart Figure 2-2 

Chain of Custody Form Figure 3-1 

Analytical Services Reguest Form Figure 3-2 

Sample Container Reguest Form Figure 3-3 

Sample Shipment Check List Figure 3-4 

Sample Label Figure 3-5 

Accuracy Control Chart Figure 4-1 

Precision Control Chart Figure 4-2 

GC Retention Time Windows Data Figure 4-3 

Organic Analysis Data Validation Checklist Figure 5-1 

Metals Analysis Data Validation Checklist Figure 5-2 

Sample Re-extraction/Re-analysis Form Figure 6-1 

Data Review and Corrective Actions Flowchart Figure 6-2 



LIST OF TABLES 

Sample Containers , Preservatives and Holding Times Table 3-1 

Standard and Solution Holding Times Table 4-1 

Calibration Frequencies Table 4-2 

Equipment List Table 4-3 

Analytical Methods Table 4-4 

Schedule of Analysis for Quality Control Samples Table 4-5 

Quality Assurance Records Table 5-1 



LIST OF APPENDICES 



Safety App-1 

Waste Disposal App-2 

Security App-3 

Executive Quality Assurance Summary App-4 

Laboratory Certifications App-5 

Analytical Laboratory Floor Plan App-6 



ULwsresntoOT 



3 



Section No. : POL 
Issue Date: 1/24/96 
Page No. : 1 



POLICY STATEMENT 

The goal of the analytical laboratory of Waste Stream 
Technology (WST) is to provide reliable data to our clients in a 
manner that will facilitate the problem solving and decision 
making processes. Because we are aware that this data must be of 
the highest quality, we are committed to an intensive and 
comprehensive program for guality assurance and guality control. 

In order to provide reliable data of the highest guality 
on a continuing and consistent basis, WST has implemented an 
internal Quality Assurance and Quality Control Program. The 
quality assurance guidelines of WST incorporate the requirements 
of the US EPA Superfund Contract Laboratory Program (CLP) and are 
in compliance with the recommended guidelines published in the US 
EPA Manual, "Handbook for Analytical Quality Control for Water 
and Wastewater Laboratories." 

This Quality Assurance and Quality Control establishes and 
documents the procedures and practices that are routinely 
implemented to ensure the integrity and validity of the data 
generated by WST. The main objectives of this program are to: 

1. Establish protocols for measuring the quality of 
each system through the use of internal audits. 

2. Recognize and define deficiencies that affect the 
quality of data. 

2. Provide a system of checks and balances to correct 
and document out-of -control conditions in a timely 
manner . 

4. Define and document the limitations on the quality 
of the data to further enhance its utility for 
problem solving, decision making and reporting. 

5. Provide a rational, well-defined format with 
credible, traceable documentation to assist in the 
internal and external evaluation of the overall 
program. 

The purpose of this Quality Assurance/Quality Control Plan 
is to establish internal protocols, procedures and guidelines to 
define and document the validity of the data produced. In this 
way we engender a system dedicated to excellence, in which we and 
our clients can have the utmost confidence. 




% 



6L c/,4/t> 

Iward l M. Oddo 
Vice-President and CFO 
Waste Stream Technology Inc 



Brian S. Schepart/ Ph.D. 

Laboratory Director 

Waste Stream Technology Inc 



ILWSTISTBEdm 



(" 



r 



Section No . : 
Issue Date: 
Page No. : 1 



ROR 
1/24/96 



RECORDS OF REVISION 



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UWSTESTBEdm 

•— ..o«.oa< 



* 



Section No. : 
Issue Date: 
Page No. : 2 



ROR 
1/24/96 



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Section 7 
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Section 2 
Section 4 
Section 7 



RECORD OF REVISION 



Table 
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4-1 
4-3 
4-4 
4-6 



Table 
Figur 
Figur 



4-1 
e 5-1 
es 5-2 



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of 31 
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through 



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5-4 



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de 



March 
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1993 
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Figures 2-1 through 2-2 December 15, 1994 

Table 4-4 pp 24-26 of 31 December 15, 1994 

Pages 1-2 of 2 December 15, 1994 

APP-6 Page 1 of 1 December 15, 1994 



Revision 6 Complete Re-issue of Manual 



January 24.. 1996 



uwsnsniEdm 



Section No. : 1 
Issue Date: 1/24/96 
Page No- : 1 

INTRODUCTION 

1.1 General Description 

Waste Stream Technology Inc. (WST) was founded in 1986 as a 
bioremediation company to address the need for alternative 
technologies to remediate water and soils contaminated with 
petroleum hydrocarbon products. In 1987, WST established its 
analytical laboratory to support its bioremediation processes and 
in July 1989, WST became a wholly owned subsidiary of Sevenson 
Environmental Services Inc. (SES) of Niagara Falls, New York. 
Since that time, the WST analytical laboratory has expanded and 
it soon became apparent that a certified public environmental 
laboratory could substantially benefit both WST's and SES's 
clients, as wells as the Western New York area. 

1.2 Objectives 

The objective of this manual is to present the Quality 
Assurance and Quality Control Plan used within WST's analytical 
laboratory to maintain the production of the highest quality data 
at all times. Specifically, this manual will address the areas 
of: 

-Organization and responsibilities of WST's 

personnel 

-Sample custody and tracking 

-Analytical procedures and the associated quality 

assurance and quality control 

-Data handling 

-Corrective actions 

1.3 Implementation 

All WST laboratory employees, and those whose job functions 
relate to the laboratory, will have access to copies of this 
manual for reference. Copies of the referenced SOP's will also be 
available for reference and guidance. It is the joint 
responsibility of the Laboratory Director, Assistant Laboratory 
Director, and the QA/QC Department to see that the operating 
criteria set forth are carried out to their satisfaction. 
Employees who, either willfully or through negligence, attempt to 
circumvent the QA/QC procedures will be reprimanded. Persistent 
violations may result in termination. Upper management levels 
will be routinely advised of the status, accomplishments, and 
success of the program through executive summaries. 



UJ 4STISTB£d m 



Section No. : 1 
Issue Date: 1/24/96 
Page No. : 2 



1.4 Amendments and Revisions 



Amendments and/or revisions to this manual will be made in a 
timely fashion dependent on the urgency and impact of any 
changes. Changes in procedures or protocols by regulatory 
agencies at the federal, state, or local level that affect 
the content of this manual will be made immediately. In addition, 
changes in methodology or instrumentation that affect Quality 
Control (QC) limits will be made as soon as the effects of these 
changes can be measured, documented, and verified. The 
incorporation of new or additional analytical capabilities into 
the laboratory program will also be dealt with immediately. 

The QC limits will be reviewed at least annually and updated 
should the data indicate a change. Editorial revisions will be 
made annually. 

Responsibility for changes will be shared by the QA/QC 
Department, Laboratory Director, Assistant Laboratory Director, 
and any other technical/professional employees as they deem 
necessary to the process. 



UWSTESTREdm 



( 



Section No. : 2 
Issue Date: 1/24/96 
Page No. : 1 

ORGANIZATION AND RESPONSIBILITIES 

2.1 Organizational Chart 

The organizational chart of Waste Stream Technology's 
analytical laboratory is depicted in Figure 2-2. Although WST has 
a small staff, it is logically arranged and the high degree of 
quality assurance can be maintained due to the ability and 
experience of each staff member (See Section 7.0 for Biographies 
of Laboratory Personnel. Figure 2-1 shows the corporate 
organizational chart for WST. 

2.2 Responsibilities 

The responsibilities of each position within WST's 
analytical laboratory are clearly defined and understood by each 
individual staff member. Each person is constantly aware that 
each task is performed carefully and attentively during the work 
day so that the highest quality data can be generated. 

The specific responsibilities of each staff member are as 
follows: 

The Laboratory Director has the overall responsibility for 
the performance of the laboratory staff and the quality of the 
data generated. He/she must also be sure that all laboratory 
personnel meet the requisite qualifications for their position in 
the laboratory. The Laboratory Director, or a designee, must also 
review and approve all outgoing reports and serve as a link for 
communication and liaison with clients. The Assistant Lab 
Director act as delegates for the Laboratory Director in his/her 
absence. 

The Assistant Laboratory Director is responsible for the 
day-to-day operation of the laboratory, including, but not 
limited to: the scheduling of sample extraction and analysis in 
conjunction with the laboratory staff; reviewing analytic data; 
assuring that all staff members are familiar with the Quality 
Assurance and Quality Control Plan (QA/QC) and maintenance of the 
QA/QC Plan; training of new staff; reviewing and approving 
outgoing reports as a designee of the Laboratory Director; 
evaluation of analytic procedures, both current and new; the 
inventory and ordering of supplies, chemicals, and standards; and 
preventive maintenance contracts and the performance of scheduled 
preventive maintenance. 

The QA/QC Officer coordinates all quality assurance 
responsibilities. The QA/QC Officer reports to the Laboratory 
Director for daily activities but is responsible to the Vice- 



uwsTisr^m 



% 



Section No. : 2 
Issue Date: 1/24/96 
Page No. : 2 

President for reporting non-conformance with the QA/QC criteria 
if corrective actions are not undertaken in a timely manner. In 
order to maintain the integrity, independence and objectivity of 
the QA/QC program, the QA/QC Officer is independent of the 
analytical process. The primary responsibilities of the QA/QC 
Officer are to review data and reports submitted by the Analyst 
prior to release, to carry out system audits, initiate corrective 
actions, and ensure compliance with the QA/QC manual and Standard 
Operating Procedures (SOP) . The QA/QC Officer has the authority 
to perform audits, submit blind control samples, access data 
files and notebooks, and reject data/reports for non-compliance 
with accepted standards. 

The Analyst is responsible for the operation and maintenance 
of their instrument. Each of the analysts has a specific 
analytical area and is familiar with the full range of duties in 
his/her respective area. Therefore, each analyst serves as 
his/her own area supervisor. Under this particular circumstance, 
each analyst, in conjunction with the Assistant Lab Director and 
Lab Director, is able to organize his/her own time and schedule 
each analysis independently. As area supervisors, they are also 
responsible for: implementing data verification procedures 
through analysis and review of tuning standard criteria (for the 
GC/MS) , continuing calibration check standards, method and, if 
necessary, reagent blanks, and other QC samples; preparing data 
packages for review by the QA/QC Officer; evaluation and 
documentation of instrument performance; and correcting problems 
which result in a decline in data quality. 

The Data Coordinator is responsible for the generation of 
final result reports for review by the Lab Director or his/her 
designee; the filing and storage of chain-of -custody forms, hard 
copies of organic and inorganic analysis data, and hard copies of 
final result reports sent to the client; and distribution of 
signed off analytical reports to the client via facsimile, next 
day air or by mail. 

The Extraction Supervisor is responsible for the supervision 
of the Extraction Technicians and, in conjunction with the 
Assistant Lab Director and Lab Director, scheduling of samples to 
be extracted. Supervision of reagent preparation, cleaning of 
glassware, and monitoring of consumable supplies, as well as the 
maintenance of the QC plan for all wet chemistry analyses and 
sample extraction procedures are also the responsibilities of the 
Extraction Supervisor. 

The Samples Custodian is responsible for receiving the 
samples upon their arrival at the laboratory. Detailed 
responsibilities of the Sample Custodian are described in Section 
3.0, Sample Custody. 



T^^^' j ■■ '■■■■ 



Section No. : 2 
Issue Date: 1/24/96 
Page No. : 3 



2.3 Training of Laboratory Personnel 



The training of personnel is covered in a separate SOP. This 
SOP includes guidelines that define the positions within the 
laboratory and the minimum required qualifications for each 
position. It also identifies the appropriate SOP's to be read and 
understood by the new employee as well as the hands-on procedures 
used in the laboratory during training. Certification of the 
trainee is provided through the analysis of quality control 
reference samples. The SOP outlines the documentation required to 
prove the employee was properly trained and the documentation 
required to show that current laboratory personnel are qualified 
for the position they hold. 



wasTESTKam 



SEVENSON ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES, INC. 






A/QC PROJECT DRGANIZATIDN 
MASSACHUSETTS MILITARY RESERVATION 





VICE PRESIDENT 
LARRY ELIA 
















MIDWEST DIV. MGR./ 
V.P. OPERATIONS 

MICHAEL LOCK 




DIRECTOR OF TREATMENT 
SERVICES 

CHRIS RICE 






















NGB PRCJEC" 

1 

OFFICES 

! 




SEVENSON 
PROJECT MANAGER 

CHRIS RICE 









































SITE SUPERVISOR 



FIELD CREW 

FOREMAN 

OPERATORS 
LABORERS 



FIELD TECHNICAL STAFF 
PROJECT CHEMIST 



QA/QC DIRECTOR 
DR. JAMES HYZY 



SUBCONTRACT 
LABORATORY 

WASTE STREAM 
TECHNOLOGY, INC. 



c 



• 



Figure 2-1 



WASTE STREAM TECHNOLOGY INC. 
ABBREVIATED ORGANIZATION CHART 



• 



PRESIDENT/CEO 



CORPORATE SECRETARY 



VICE PRESIDENT/COO 



FIELD OPERATIONS DIRECTOR 



QA/QC 



PRODUCTION MANAGER 



FIELD TECHNICIANS 



LABORATORY DIRECTOR 



PRODUCTION PERSONNEL 



I— ANALYTICAL LABORATORY 



OWSTTSTREdm 

FTC •mO'-O'tl 



r 



I 



Figure 2-2 



WASTE STREAM TECHNOLOGY INC 
ANALYTICAL LABORATORY 
ORGANIZATION CHART 



CORPORATE OFFICER 



HEALTH 4 SAFETY 



QA/QC 



LABORATORY DIRECTOR 



ASSISTANT LAB DIRECTOR 



OATA COORDINATOR 





J 


ORGANIC LAB ANALYSTS 


INORGANIC LAB ANALYSTS 



EXTRACTION LAB SUPERVISOR 



EXIRACTIOfl CHEMISTS 



WET CHEMISTRY LAB 






e 



• 



Section No. : 3 
Issue Date: 1/24/96 
Page No. : 1 

SAMPLE CUSTODY 

It is essential that documentation is provided for all 
samples received at WST's laboratory which traces each sample, in 
a legally defensible manner, from sample collection, to the 
laboratory, and through the analytical procedures to disposal. 
Samples enter the WST analytical process in one of two ways; 
either from collection by WST Field Technicians or from 
collection by the client or agency other than WST. This section 
will address the chain of custody procedures used both outside 
and inside the laboratory. (Detailed procedures can be found in 
the Sample Custody SOP) . 

3.1 Field Collection by WST Field Personnel 

When WST is contracted by a client to collect samples for 
analytic testing, and the types of analyses required are 
determined, the Sample Custodian will assemble the appropriate 
sample and shipping containers, and add the appropriate 
preservatives, if necessary. Table 3-1 lists the appropriate 
containers, preservatives, sample sizes, and holding times for 
the various analytical parameters tested by WST's laboratory. For 
all samples, the containers used will be new and pre-cleaned, 
from an approved vendor. 

After the sample is collected, the Field Technician will 
label the sample containers with the following information: (A 
sample label is shown in Figure 3-5) . 

1. Site name and Client name 

2. Location from where the sample was taken 

3. Date and time of sampling 

4. Whether the sample is a composite or a grab 

5. Preservatives added, if appropriate 

6. Name of the sampler 

When all the appropriate samples have been taken and the 
sample containers have been properly labeled, the Sample 
Technician will complete a Chain of Custody Form (See Figure 3-1) 
by filling in all of the information listed in 1 through 6 above 
as well as the types of analyses to be performed. The samples 
will then be packed securely to prevent breakage and with cold 
packs when required to keep samples cold during shipment or 
delivery to the WST laboratory. The sampler will then sign the 
Chain of Custody (COC) Form and retain the pink copy for his/her 
records. The white, blue and yellow copies will accompany the 
samples throughout transportation. Each person handling the 
samples will sign the COC Form and record the time and date of 
transfer, both when receiving and relinquishing custody of the 
samples . 



UMSTESTB£/*T1 



Section Ho. : 3 
Issue Date: 1/24/96 
Page No. : 2 



3.2 Collection from an Outside Agency 



When a client or agency contacts WST to perform analytical 
testing, and the types of analyses to be performed are decided, 
the contact person at WST will fill out an Analytical Services 
Request Form (See Figure 3-2) and submit it to the Assistant Lab 
Director for review and scheduling. The Assistant Director will 
then forward the Request to the Sample Custodian to inform 
him/her of the samples impending arrival. If WST is to provide 
the sample containers, the WST contact person will also complete 
a Sample Container Request Form (See Figure 3-3) and submit it to 
the Sample Custodian. After comparing the Sample Container 
Request Form with the Analytical Services Request Form, the 
Sample Custodian will then collect the appropriate type and size 
containers, and, if required, add preservatives. The containers 
will then be securely packed into a cooler with a COC Form, and 
shipped to the location requested by the client. 

3.3 Sample Receipt 

When the samples arrive at the WST laboratory, whether or 
not they were sampled by WST Field Technicians, custody is 
transferred to the Sample Custodian, who will be the last person 
to sign the COC. The Sample Custodian will then open the shipping 
container under a fume hood and perform the following: 

1. Check the temperature inside the shipping 
container to assure that the samples were kept 
cool . 

2. Check the pH of the non-volatile water samples 
that were to be preserved and make sure that they 
were properly preserved. 

3. Check each sample container to see if breakage, 
cracking, external corrosion, or leaking has 
occurred . 

4. Inventory the samples shipped to see if the number 
of samples received and the description on each 
sample label correspond to the information on the 
COC. 

5. Complete a Sample Shipment Checklist Form (See 
Figure 3-4 ) . 

If irregularities are noted during the inspection of the 
samples, the Sample Custodian will submit the Sample Shipment 
Checklist to the QA/QC Officer or a designee, who in turn, will 
contact the client and/or Field Technician. The fate of the 
sample shipment will then be determined through discussion with 
the client. A record of this conversation with the client's 
representative is entered on the Sample Shipment Checklist, 
including the name of the contact, time and date of the 



uwsnEsntoin 



• 



Section No. : 3 
Issue Date: 1/24/96 
Page No. : 3 

conversation, and the resolutions reached on irregularities. 

3.4 Custody in the Laboratory 

After the samples are inventoried and the Sample Shipment 
Checklist is finalized, each sample is individually logged into 
the Master Log Book listing the following information: 

1. A unique sequenced WST sample number assigned only 
to that sample 

2. Client name or name of agency representing the 
client 

3. Site name 

4. Client/Site Sample location or description 

5. Date received and date sampled 

6. Container size and number of containers 

7. Analytical tests to be performed 

3. Sample group number; each group of samples 

received froma site will be assigned its own group 
number which is used to track the samples as a 
group. 

9. Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) 
loggin number 

10. Initials of the person logging in the samples 
(usually the Sample Custodian) 

The sample ID numbers are then recorded onto the label of 
each container associated with each of the samples and the sample 
containers are then placed into a sample storage refrigerator in 
a specific location designated by the Sample Custodian. This 
location is then recorded onto the COC. Every time a subsample is 
taken from these samples for extraction, the samples will be 
returned to this designated location (See Section 3.6). The 
sequential WST sample numbers are also recorded on the COC 
adjacent to the corresponding client/site sample location or 
description. The sample group number is then recorded on the COC 
for tracking purposes. The Sample Shipment Checklist is then 
attached to the white copy of the COC. 

The Sample Custodian will then log the samples into the LIMS 
Labworks database. The following information is entered for each 
sample in the group: 

1. The unique WST sample ID number assigned to the 
sample 

2. Date and time the sample was collected 

3. Date the sample was received (submitted) 

4. Name of the client and the site 

5. The client/site sample description or location 






• 



Section Mo. : 3 
Issue Date: 1/24/96 
Page No. : 4 

6. Date the analytical report is due 

7. Analyses required on the samples. Each analysis 
performed in the laboratory has a designated 
analysis code. The code for each analysis 
required on the sample will be assigned to the 
sample. 

8. Any comments/notes regarding the sample 

9. Date on which the sample will have exceeded its 
holding time 

10. The sample group number 

The COC and Sample Shipment Checklist are then submitted to 
the Data Coordinator for reporting and filing. 

The Labworks LIMS system will be used to track the samples 
and all the data generated from the analytical tests performed on 
these samples throughout the analytical process. Each analytical 
section has access to the LIMS system and, on a daily basis, they 
generate a backlog report that shows them which samples require 
what analyses, when the results are due and when the sample 
holding time expires. The backlog report is then used by the 
technicians and/or analysts, in conjunction with the Extraction 
Lab Supervisor and/or Assistant Lab Director to prioritize sample 
extraction and analysis. 

When an analysis on a sample has been completed, the analyst 
will enter the results, either manually or by automatic computer 
file transfer, into the LIMS system under the appropriate 
analysis code for that sample. The data is then submitted to the 
QA/QC Department for review. 

3.5 Sample Disposal 

Unless specifically requested by the client, samples are 
usually held for 30 days after the issuance of the final report. 
The prospect of additional analyses on a sample must be viewed in 
the context of the recommended holding times. 

Sample disposal occurs in one of two ways. The samples will 
either be sent back to the point or origination (i.e., client or 
site) or eliminated as waste. Samples that are returned to the 
point of origin will be packed securely in a cooler. A list of 
the WST sample ID numbers contained within the cooler will be 
generated, signed and dated by the Sample Custodian. A photocopy 
of the signed and dated list will be placed in the cooler and the 
cooler shipped back to t'he site. The original copy will be placed 
into the Sample Custodian's disposal file. The date of return 
will be noted for each sample in the Master Logbook 



UJ flSTESTR£d m 



* 



J 



Section No. : 3 
Issue Date: 1/24/96 
Page No. : 5 

Samples which are eliminated as waste will be disposed of in 
appropriate, clearly labeled waste containers, based on the 
samples' matrix and the characteristics and properties of the 
waste. These characteristics and properties will be determined by 
a review of the analytical data and history of the samples. Care 
must be exercised in sample disposal so chemically incompatible 
wastes are not mixed together. Each disposal container is 
labelled to identify, in general terms, the type of material that 
was placed in each container. When disposal is complete, the 
person disposing of the containers will sign and date the drum 
labels. Samples that were found to be innocuous will be disposed 
of as either non-hazardous waste, or if aqueous, by pouring down 
the drain. When a sample is disposed the date of laboratory 
disposal will be recorded in the Master Log Book. 

3.6 Sample Security 

In order to maintain the integrity and validity of the 
sample(s) within the laboratory, all samples are maintained under 
locked storage or in limited access areas under the jurisdiction 
of the Sample Custodian. Release of samples to laboratory 
personnel necessitates internal chain of custody procedures. 
Internal chain-of-custody is tracked by the Sample Custodian via 
a notebook. Entered into the notebook is WST sample ID number, 
the date and time the sample is relinquished, the name of the 
person to whom the sample was given (responsible party) , the date 
and time the sample is returned, and the Sample Custodian's 
initials. The responsible party is required to maintain the 
sample(s) in their physical possession or view at all times. The 
Sample Custodian, Assistant Lab Director, or QA/QC Officer may 
confiscate unattended samples, return them to storage, notify the 
appropriate supervisor, and reprimand the responsible party. 






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Wasl« Strum Technology ,nc 
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ANALYTICAL SIiRVlCl-S RF.QUFST FORM 



Request Taken Cy 



Date Requested 



Client 



Telephone 



Client Contact 



Fax 



Address 



Start Date 



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Lab/P.O. n 


Number nl 
Samples 


Matrix 


Analytical Parameters 


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Time (Days) 


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Special Instructions 



Laboratory Use Only: Sample Croup tt 



wasrzsn&m 

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Figure 3-3 



WASTE STREAM TECHNOLOGY INC. 
SAMPLE CONTAINER REQUEST FORM 



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Job number: 



Shipping address: 



Attention to: 



Date needed by: 



Amount 


Type 


Size 


Preservation 


Analytic 
Test 


Expected 
Sampling dale 















































































































































































































Type: Glass or HDPE 



WST received: 
Date sent/initials: 

Courier/Shipping No. 






I ■" i 1 1 1 1 1 ( « '. 'I 



WAS (P. SIIICAM TECHNOLOGY INC. 
SAMIM.F. SHIPMENT CHECKLIST 



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• 



LUd STESTRfca m 



• 



Section No. : 4 
Issue Date: 1/24/96 
Page No. : 1 

ANALYTICAL PROCEDURES 

4.1 Statement of Procedures 

All analyses performed at Waste Stream Technology Inc. are 
EPA approved methods taken from the following sources: (A 
complete listing of reference methods is found in Table 4-5) . 

EPA-600/4-79-020, "Method for Chemical Analyses of Water and 
Wastes", Revised March 1983. 

Federal Register, EPA 40 CFR Part 136, "Guidelines 
Establishing Test Procedures for the Analysis of Pollutants 
Under the Clean Water Act", Revised July, 1991. 

Federal Register, EPA 40 CFR Part 268, Appendix I, Revised 
June 1990. 

EPA SW-846, "Test Methods for Evaluating Solid Wastes", 3rd 
Edition, Revision 1, July 1992. 

4.2 Quality Assurance Objectives 

The objective of the Quality Assurance and Quality Control 
plan at the WST laboratory is to generate analytical data of 
known, documented quality that is in compliance with established 
regulatory guidelines and protocols. This is accomplished through 
a system of statistical measurement and documentation of 
accuracy, precision, and comparability of each analytical assay 
performed. These three parameters are established through a 
Quality Control (QC) program, a system of operations undertaken 
in the laboratory to ensure that the data produced is generated 
within known probability limits of accuracy and precision, and a 
Quality Assurance (QA) program, a system whereby the laboratory 
can assure clients, government agencies, and accrediting bodies, 
that the laboratory is generating data of proven and known 
quality. The latter system is accomplished through the QC 
program, by the analysis of external quality control and 
proficiency test samples, through the use of accepted analytical 
testing procedures and through external laboratory audits. 

4.2.1 Accuracy 

By definition, accuracy measures the ability of an 
analytical procedure to determine the true concentration of one 
or more constituents in a sample matrix. Initially, accuracy is 
determined by the analysis of a minimum of four replicate blank 
samples which have been spiked with a known concentration of a 
reference standard. This reference standard contains all the 



UJdSTESn&fTI 



Section No. : 4 
Issue Date: 1/24/96 
Page No. : 2 

constituents appropriate to each analytical procedure, and is 
taken through each step of the entire analytical procedure. (The 
reference standard used in the reference samples will be prepared 
independently from those standards used in calibration) . The 
spiked components are then recovered during analysis and the mean 
and standard deviation of the four recoveries for each analyte 
are calculated and compared to the accuracy limits published in 
the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) method. 

When the accuracy of the recoveries of each constituent of 
the analytical procedure have met the EPA criteria, accuracy will 
continue to be assessed by the analysis of one reference sample 
for every ten samples analyzed. When a total of twenty reference 
samples have been analyzed, the mean (X) and standard deviation 
(SD) of the percent recoveries of each constituent will be 
calculated and the upper and lower warning and control limits 
determined by: 

Upper Warning Limit = X + 2SD 
Upper Control Limit = X + 3SD 

Lower Warning Limit = X - 2SD 
Lower Control Limit = X - 3SD 

The average recovery and warning and control limits for each 
analyte will then be expressed on a control chart. All subsequent 
analyses of reference samples will then be compared to the 
control chart to track the accuracy of the procedure. (See Figure 
4-1 for Accuracy Control Chart) . 

4.2.2 Precision 

By definition, precision is a measure of the ability of an 
analytical procedure to reproduce data. Precision differs from 
accuracy in that an analytical procedure can generate 
reproducible data yet still be inaccurate. Therefore, both 
accuracy and precision need to be assessed as singular entities. 
The precision of a procedure is determined by comparison of 
results from duplicate sample analyses. One sample per every ten 
samples will be analyzed in duplicate and the relative percent 
difference (RPD) from the duplicate analyses will be calculated 
for each analyte measured by the procedure. When twenty RPD's for 
each analyte have been calculated, the mean and standard 
deviation of the twenty RPD's will be used to develop a precision 
control chart for each analyte. Subsequent duplicate analyses 
will then be assessed for acceptability based on these precision 
control chart parameters. (See Figure 4-2 for Precision Control 
Chart) . 



uwsrEsn*£dm 



Section No. : 4 
Issue Date: 1/24/96 
Page No. : 3 

It should be noted that accuracy and precision are 
determined using the entire analytical procedure including 
extraction of the analytes from the sample matrix. Many methods 
use the same mode of analysis but have multiple extraction 
procedures depending on the matrix and/or the concentration of 
the analytes expected to be found in the matrix. In these cases, 
accuracy and precision must be established for each type of 
extraction procedure. 

4.2.3 Comparability 

Analytical results of the tests on a given compound must be 
comparable to test results performed by a different laboratory on 
like compounds. To obtain this goal, precision and accuracy of 
each analytical procedure must be compared to and fall within the 
acceptable limits prescribed by the EPA in their methodologies 
and protocols. 

Comparability is also accomplished through that analysis of 
external QC samples and proficiency test samples, since the 
results from the analyses of these samples are assessed through 
interlaboratory comparison. 

4.2.4 Completeness 

Completeness is a measure of the amount of data obtained 
from an analytical system compared to the total amount expected 
to be obtained under normal conditions. A ninety percent 
completeness figure is usually required for a particular analysis 
and overall project objective. 

4.2.5 Reagents, Solvents, Water Glassware, and Gases 

All reagents used within the laboratory for sample and 
standard preparation meet the American Chemical Society 
(analytical reagent grade) standards or better, if the procedure 
requires a higher grade of purity. Solvents used for sample 
extraction and standard preparation are of gas chromatographic 
quality. All chemicals, when received by the laboratory, will be 
labeled with the date of receipt, the date the container was 
opened and the initials of who opened it. A chemical logbook is 
maintained which lists the reagent, source, lot number, and date 
in service. 

Reagents, when prepared, will be labeled as to the date of 
preparation and expiration, the composition and concentration of 
the reagent, the reagent ID number and the initials of the 
preparer. This information will also be recorded in a reagent 



uja srEsraa m 



Section No. : 4 
Issue Date: 1/24/96 
Page No. : 4 

preparation notebook. In addition to analyzing reagent and method 
blanks to check for reagent and solvent contamination, reagents 
and solvents are continuously observed for signs of degradation 
such as change of color, precipitation, or mold formation. 

All water used in the laboratory for preparation of reagents 
and rinsing of glassware is ASTM Type II water. This is produced 
by passing tap water through two mixed bed deionization tanks and 
then passing the deionized water upward through a high capacity 
activated carbon filter. In addition, 18 megaohm water is 
produced through a Milli-Q high purity water system. The 
conductivity of this system is measured and recorded daily. 

Disposable glassware will be used whenever possible within 
an analytical procedure to reduce the possibility of sample 
cross-contamination. When non-disposable glassware is used, it 
will be thoroughly cleaned and baked using a cleaning protocol 
approved by the EPA. 

Gases which are used in sample concentration and gas 
chromatography analyses are of high and ultrahigh purity and they 
are further purified by the use of in-line gas filtration units. 

4.3 Quality Assurance and Quality Control 

4.3.1 Standard Preparation 

Every assay will require, at a minimum, a calibration 
standard or a quality control check standard. Other analyses 
will require initial calibration, continuing calibration and 
reference sample standards, and still others will also require 
matrix spike, surrogate and internal standards as well. 

A calibration standard is made by the appropriate dilution 
of a pure substance, the purity of which is traceable to a 
primary standard. Because of the high sensitivity of many 
analytical instruments, the calibration standard is an extremely 
dilute version of the pure compound. Because of the high dilution 
required, in order to be within the linear range of the 
instrument, the preparation of the calibration standard is 
frequently made by serial dilution rather than in a single step. 
In order to provide standard solutions at sufficiently low 
concentrations, a minuscule amount of the pure substance will be 
required, the measurement of which is subject to extreme error. 
Thus, it is preferable to deal with dilution errors, rather than 
with the large error associated with the measurement of a small 
amount of pure substance. 



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The initial pure standard is usually obtained as either a 
pure material or already in solution prepared as a certified 
solution of a given concentration of the pure compound or 
compounds. In preparing stock solutions of the calibration 
standard, great care must be exercised in measuring weights and 
volumes as accurately as possible, since all analyses following 
the calibration will be based on the accuracy of the calibration, 
and the accuracy of any subsequent data ultimately cannot be any 
better than that of the calibration curve. 

Each standard also has a definite lifetime in which it can 
be used. Standard holding times are listed in Table 4-1 and it is 
the responsibility of the analyst to assure that all standards 
used are within the standard solution holding time. It should be 
noted, however, that the holding times for standard solutions 
should only be used as a guide and that in preparing or using 
working standard solutions, the analyst must compare each 
standard run with the previous standard runs to assure that 
response factors fall within the historically accepted range. 

For each standard solution that is prepared, accurate 
records will be kept in the standard preparation log for the 
analysis in which the standard will be used. The following 
information will be entered in the log at the time of stock 
standard preparation: 

1. Date of preparation 

2. Date of expiration (See holding time guide) 

3. For each compound or solution of compounds, the 
supplier and the lot number of the primary 
standard, the ID number of the primary standard 
and the amount taken in the case of pre-prepared 
standard solutions 

4. The solvent identification (compound, supplier, 
lot number) 

5. Final volume of the stock standard 

5. Identification number assigned to the newly 

prepared stock standard 
7. Name of the analyst preparing the standard. 

When preparing working standards (i.e., calibration, 
continuing calibration, matrix spike, and surrogate standards) it 
will be the analyst's responsibility to make sure the stock 
standard is still viable. The preparation of these standards will 
also be documented and filed for future reference. The following 
information will be recorded: 



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1. Date of preparation 

2. Date of expiration 

3. Standard identification number of the primary or 
secondary stock standard used to prepare the 
working standard 

4. Final volume of the diluted standard 

5. Final concentration of each compound in the 
diluted standard 

6. Identification number assigned to the newly 
prepared diluted standard 

7. Name of the analyst preparing the standard. 

All standards and standard solutions will be maintained in 
appropriate containers as stated in the method SOP. 

Storage of standards and standard solutions will typically 
be kept in the refrigerator at 4°C, however specific storage 
details will be listed in the SOP for the analysis in which the 
standard is to be used (e.g. standards for metal analysis are 
stored at room temperature) . Standards and standard solutions 
will also be stored in an area not used for storage of samples 
and sample extracts to prevent any possibility of cross- 
contamination. 

4.3.2 Determination of Detection and Quantitation Limits 

Most of the assays employed by WST require knowledge of 
detection limits in order to be able to bracket analytical 
results that are obtained. Several such limits exist, and since 
these limits can be defined in various ways, the definition and 
determination which we will use is given below. 

4.3.2.1 Instrument Detection Limit 

In simple terms, the instrument detection limit (IDL) is the 
smallest quantity of material the instrument can detect. For our 
purpose, the instrument detection limit is defined as three times 
the standard deviation from the mean of seven replicate 
measurements of a low concentration standard that produces a 
definite, measurable signal. The signal may be an area count, a 
peak height, or an absorbance reading. The nature of the signal 
is dictated by the instrument and detector that are used. The 
instrument detection limit is calculated from the following 
equation: 

3SD 

IDL = 

RF 



imSTCSTREgm 

p" i c - « ? V 0< *- 



where, 



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IDL = Instrument detection limit, in weight units for 
those parameters where the signal depends on absolute 
quantity (i.e., GC analyses), and in concentration 
units for those parameters that are concentration 
dependent 

SD = Standard deviation of the seven replicate 
readings, un units of the reading (i.e., area count) 

RF = Response factor, in units of signal reading/unit 
weight or concentration, depending on the units used 
for IDL 

The calculation for standard deviation is shown below. 



SD = 



/ 



E [ x (i) - X (m) ) 2 
(n-1) 



where, x (i) = The value of the i ' th reading of the set of 

replicate measurements 

X (m) = The mean value of the replicates 

n = The number of replicate measurements 

The mean, X (m) , is determined as follows: 

S x (i) 
n 



X (m) = 



In order for the results to be useful, the standard chosen 
to obtain the detection limit should be such that the mean of its 
reading, X (m) , is slightly greater than 3SD. This may require 
some trial and error initially when an IDL is determined for the 
first time on an instrument. 

The IDL will be determined on an annual basis, and whenever 
the instrument has undergone extensive maintenance. Records of 
performing the IDL will be maintained in the analysis notebook, 
and values of the IDL will be updated each time that the IDL is 
determined . 



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4.3.2.2 Method Detection Limit 

The method detection limit is obtained in a manner very 
similar to that of the IDL. The principle difference is that in 
determining the method detection limit (MDL) , the analyte(s) is 
subjected to the entire analytical protocol for the specific 
method that is being employed. This includes every step, from 
extraction to final analysis. 

To determine the MDL, seven replicates of the appropriate 
volume of extraction solvent or Type II water are spiked with a 
known amount of the analyte(s). The amount that is being added is 
the same for all seven replicates, and should be at least two to 
three times greater than the previously determined IDL. The seven 
replicates are subject to the same extraction and analytical 
procedures as a sample would be, and the concentrations of the 
analytes of interest are measured. The MDL is defined as the 
standard deviation of seven readings multiplied by the student t- 
test at a 99%, single-sided confidence interval (t99) using n-1 
degrees of freedom (df ) . The calculation of the MDL should be 
done in units of weight of the analyte. In this fashion, such 
variables as injection volume in chromatographic techniques or 
pathlength in spectrophotometry techniques are eliminated. 

The equation that applies to the calculation of the MDL is: 

MDL = SD (t99[ 1-sided] ;df=6) ; or SD x 3.143 

where ; 

MDL = Method detection limit, in units of weight 
(i.e. ,ng,/xg) for those methods dependent upon absolute 
quantity, and in concentration units for those 
dependent on concentration (refer to 40 CFR, Part 136, 
Appendix B) 

SD = The standard deviation of the seven readings from 
the mean, in units of weight or concentration 

The MDL determination will be considered acceptable as long 
as it is not less than 1/10 nor greater than the concentration 
used for the determination. 

The method detection limit will be determined for all 
analytes associated with the method on at least an annual basis. 
It will be determined on a quarterly basis when the instrument 
undergoes a major repair or modification and if the IDL shows a 



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significant departure from the previously determined IDL. If the 
IDL has remained substantially unchanged after the repair or 
modification, there is no need to run the MDL again. 

The method detection limits must also be determined whenever 
the sample preparation or extraction method is modified. 

4.3.2.3 Quantitation Limits 

The quantitation limit is determined at the same time as the 
MDL and from the same runs. The quantitation limit (QL) is 
defined as five times the MDL. Thus, 

QL = 5 x MDL 

4.3.2.4 Conversion of Detection Limits to Minimum 
Detectable Concentration 

The conversion of the detection limit to minimum detectable 
concentration is calculated as follows: 

DL v(j) 

DLS = x 

v(i) S 
where; 

DLS = Detection limit in sample units of weight per 
unit weight or per unit volume 

DL = Either MDL or QL as defined in the preceding 
sections 

v(i) = Volume of prepared sample taken for analysis 
(such as the volume of extract injected into a GC) , in 
ml 

v(j) = Volume of the prepared extract (such as the 
final volume of extract) , in ml 

S = The sample size that was taken to produce sample 
volume v (j). Sample size is normally measured in 
liters in aqueous samples and in grams, dry weight, for 
solid samples. 

4.3.2.5 Documentation of Detection Limits 

Whenever IDLs, MDLs, and QLs are determined, the results 
will be maintained by the analyst based on the method used for 



f77 I n «QlOC T 



• 



# 



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determining the analytes of interest. The results must include 
the date of determination, the type of detection limit, the value 
for each analyte in terms of weight or concentration units, and 
the initials of the analyst who performed the determination. 

A copy of all detection limit determinations will also be 
submitted to the QA/QC Department for review and approval. 

4.3.3 Instrument Calibration 

Instrument and equipment calibration must be rigorously and 
routinely performed in order to provide reasonable assurances 
that the data generated is valid and acceptable. 

Two principle types of calibration are performed. The first 
is initial calibration, which determines the linear range of the 
instrument and its response factor. The second is verification or 
continuing calibration, which serves, during the 
course of running samples, to ascertain that the instrument 
calibration has not drifted unacceptably . The frequencies of 
performing the different types of calibration are listed in Table 
4-2. In addition, laboratory control samples, or reference 
samples, are run on a routine basis for additional verification 
as indicated in Table 4-5. 

4.3.3.1 Initial Calibration 

All instrumental methods of analysis are subjected to an 
initial calibration, consisting of the measurement of 3 to 5 
different standard solutions of the analytes of interest. The 
standard solution of the lowest concentration should have a 
concentration of the analytes of interest at or near the 
concentration that corresponds to the MDL or QL; and the standard 
solution of the highest concentration should have a concentration 
of the analytes of interest at or near the upper end of the 
linear range of the detector. 

In performing the analyses of standards to determine the 
response factor and linear range, the standard solutions are 
prepared as mentioned in Section 4.3.1, and the surrogates and 
internal standards are added to it when appropriate. This 
information must be documented in the analysis records and placed 
in the method file for future reference. Listed should be working 
standard ID numbers used for calibration, the date the 
calibration was performed, and the name of the analyst performing 
the calibration. 



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When the standard analyses are completed, the calibration 
curve of each analyte is generated either one of two ways. For 
GC/MS analyses, the response factor (RF) for each calibration 
level is determined as follows; 

RF = (A x C is )/(A u C x ) 

where: A, = area of compound being measured 

A i5 = area of specific internal standard 

C x = concentration of compound being measured 

C i5 = concentration of specific internal standard 

The average response factor (RF, V .) and the standard 
deviation of the response factors is then calculated and the 
percent relative standard deviation (%RSD) is determined by: 

%RSD = SD x 100 
RF WI 

If the %RSD falls within the criteria specified in the 
method, then the curve is considered linear and the average 
response factor can be used to quantitate results. 

All other instrument calibration curves are generated using 
a straight line linear regression equation in the form: y = mx + 
b (or y = ax, and the line is forced through zero) , where y = the 
measured response (area units, absorbance etc.); x = the known 
concentration of analyte; m = the slope of the curve, and b = the 
y intercept. 

In addition to determining the values of m and b, the 
correlation coefficient is determined as a measure of how closely 
the five points are to a straight line. The correlation 
coefficient is determined by the equation: 

n E (x y) - S (x) E (y) 

r = 



J 



[n Z x- -(Ex) 2 ] [ n E y 2 - (E y 2 ) ) 



where, r = Correlation coefficient, x = The known amount of 
analyte, y = The measured response, and n = The number of 
standards run to obtain the calibration curve. 

In order for the curve to be valid, r must be 0.995 or 
higher, and the ratio b/m should be no greater than the method 
detection limit. If r is < 0.995 it usually implies that either 
the lowest or highest concentration of standard is outside the 



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linear range. To correct this, the analyst should rerun the 
highest standard and also another high standard which is a 
slightly lower concentration than the initially used high 
standard. Then r can be calculated again using the response from 
the lower of the two standards. Similarly, the effect of slightly 
increasing the concentration of the lowest standard should be 
examined. 

If the ratio b/m criterion is not met, the problem may be 
with contamination in the system or change in noise level of the 
instrument. To correct for this, the instrument detection limit 
should be checked first. If it has in fact changed, the ratio 
should be compared to the newly determined noise level, in order 
to see if the criterion is met. 

Certifiable standards are used in the preparation of 
solutions for calibration as much as possible. However, it is 
always possible that the manufacturer made a mistake. To 
circumvent this possibility of error due to a mistake in the 
manufactured primary standard, a QC check standard will be 
analyzed whenever an initial calibration curve is constructed. 
The QC check standard will consist of a solution of analytes of 
interest, and at a known concentration, but obtained and prepared 
by a different source than the calibration standards. When the 
analyte concentrations in the check standard are calculated, they 
should differ by no more than fifteen percent from the known 
concentration. If the discrepancy is greater than fifteen 
percent, a determination of the source of inaccuracy will be 
performed. 

After the calibration curve has been validated, a dated and 
initialized hard copy of the calibration table listing five 
response factors, the average response factor, the SD, and the 
%RSD for each analyte is placed in the method file for future 
reference. If the curve was generated using linear regression 
then a hard copy of the curve listing the x values used, the 
corresponding y values generated, the slope and intercept of the 
curve and the correlation coefficient for each analyte will be 
placed in the reference file for future reference. 

4.3.3.2 Continuing Calibration 

Continuing calibrations serve to ensure that the instrument, 
during the course of running samples, is remaining sufficiently 
stable so the response factor calculated in the initial 
calibration remains valid. 



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In performing a continuing calibration, a midrange standard 
containing the analytes of interest, and internal and surrogate 
compounds, if applicable, is analyzed. For GC/MS analysis, the 
response factor for each analyte is determined from the 
continuing calibration analysis (Some methods specify that the 
RFs be determined for specific continuing calibration check 
compounds) . The percent difference (%D) of the continuing 
calibration response factor from the average response factor of 
the calibration curve is then calculated by: 

RF, ve - RF ece x 100 
% D = 

RF,„ e 

If the percent differences from the continuing calibration 
analysis are within the acceptable criteria, as specified in the 
method, the instrument is considered to be within calibration, 
and analysis may continue using the curve. If the response factor 
is determined to be outside the acceptance range, the instrument 
must be recalibrated by using the initial calibration process. 
Samples that have been analyzed since the last acceptable 
calibration will also need to be reanalyzed after the instrument 
has been recalibrated. Generally, the acceptable criteria for 
GC/MS is between 20% to 30%. 

For linear regression curves, the concentration of each 
analyte in the midrange standard analysis, which has been 
calculated from the current calibration curve, is compared with 
the expected value of each analyte in the standard and a percent 
true value (%TV) is determined by dividing the value found by the 
expected value times 100%. The %TV must be within 85% to 115% 
for the calibration curve to still be considered acceptable. 

Each time a continuing calibration analysis is performed, it 
must be documented and placed in the method files to track the 
validity of the calibration curve over time. Recorded will be the 
analytes, the average response factor, the response factor from 
the continuing calibration analysis, and the percent difference 
of the response. For the liner regression curves, the analytes, 
the concentration found, the expected concentration and the %TV 
will be recorded. Frequencies for continuing calibration can be 
found in Table 4-3. 

In performing continuing daily calibrations for ICP and 
graphite/AA, the high level standard is analyzed immediately 
after the initial calibration is performed and the results of the 
analyses must be within 10% of the true value. Also, a midrange 
continuing calibration verification standard will be analyzed 



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after every ten samples analyzed and at the end of the analysis 
sequence. Again the results must be within 10% of true value, or 
else recalibration must be performed. 

4.3.4 Analysis of Quality Control Samples 

Routine quality control samples are analyzed to assure that 
the operation is within control as established for the laboratory 
on the basis of historical data. The routine quality control 
consists of blanks, spiked blanks or reference samples, spiked 
samples, duplicate samples, and in some cases, external check 
samples analyses. These are discussed in the following sections. 

4.3.4.1 Blanks 

There are two types of blanks associated with internal 
quality control. They are the reagent blank and method blank. 

4.3.4.1.1 Reagent Blank 

The reagent blank is the reagent(s) and/or solvent(s) that 
are normally used for sample preparation, but without going 
through any of the preparation steps. The reagent blank is 
normally not analyzed, unless the method blank (See section 
4.3.4.1.2 below) shows the presence of contamination which may 
have arisen from the reagent and/or solvent. 

4.3.4.1.2 Method Blank 

The method blank is a known amount of the reagent or solvent 
which is carried through the all of the preparatory steps of a 
method prior to its analysis, adding internal and surrogate 
standards if appropriate for the method. The method blank is 
prepared with every batch of samples that is being prepared at 
the same time, provided the batch is no greater than twenty 
samples. For batches which are greater than twenty samples, a 
method blank will be prepared for every sub-batch of twenty 
samples. In addition, a method blank is prepared whenever the lot 
number of any reagent is changed. The preparation log will then 
indicate which samples are associated with the new lot number of 
reagent (s). The method blank is analyzed and the data is reviewed 
prior to the analysis of samples. If no analytes are found above 
the method detection limits, analysis of the prepared samples may 
be undertaken. If analytes are found above the method detection 
limit, but below the quantitation limit, the associated prepared 
samples may be analyzed, but the results will be flagged or 
corrected by the blank. 



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If analytes are found above the quantitation limit, analyses 
of the associated samples will not be undertaken until the 
contamination source is identified and isolated. At this stage 
the reagent blank will be analyzed. If it is found that the 
reagent blank is the source of contamination, the samples will be 
reprepared using a new lot of reagent (s). 

4.3.4.2 Spiked Blank 

The spiked blank, or reference sample, serves as a measure 
of accuracy of the analytical procedure independent of matrix 
effects. The spiked blank is prepared by adding known amounts of 
specific analytes to the appropriate volume of reagent grade 
water or extraction solvent and subjecting the spiked sample to 
the entire extraction procedure. 

One spiked blank is prepared for every ten samples of the 
same matrix that are subjected to sample preparation at the same 
time. The spike contains all the analytes which are specified in 
the method of analysis to be performed. 

Preparation of the spiking mixture is done in the same 
manner as the preparation of standard solutions for calibration 
except that it will be prepared from a source independent of that 
used for the calibration standard preparation. The preparation of 
the mix will be recorded in the Standard Preparation Logbook and 
assigned a standard ID number (per Section 4.3.1). 

The spiked blank is then carried throughout the entire 
extraction and analytical procedure, and the concentrations of 
the spiked analytes determined. These results will be compared to 
pre-established acceptance criteria (See Section 4.2) to 
determine the degree of accuracy of the data in the laboratory. 
If the spiked blank does not meet the established criteria, it is 
assumed that the sample preparation or analysis have been faulty, 
and the batch of samples associated with the spiked blank will be 
reprepared and/or reanalyzed after the reason for failure has 
been determined. 

4.3.4.3 Spiked Sample 

Spiked samples, or matrix spike samples, serve to identify 
whether the sample matrix provides certain effects which preclude 
the ability to recover analytes through the prescribed method. 
Thus the spiked sample is used to determine the accuracy of a 
method based on the matrix being analyzed. 






Section No. : 4 
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One sample per every twenty samples of the same matrix will 
be selected at random and two aliquots of this sample will be 
extracted and analyzed, one spiked with the appropriate spiking 
solution and one without. The recovery of the spiked analytes 
will then be determined. After the analysis of twenty spiked 
samples of each matrix and/or each extraction method has been 
performed, a control chart of each of the spiked compounds will 
be generated to express the upper and lower control limits of 
recovery. All subsequent analyses of spiked samples will then be 
compared to the control chart appropriate for the matrix and/or 
extraction method. 

4.3.4.4 Duplicate Sample 

One sample for every twenty samples of the same matrix will 
be selected at random, and two aliquots of this sample will be 
extracted and analyzed to track the precision of the analytical 
procedure. The results of the two analyses will be compared and 
the relative percent difference (RPD) between each analyte 
detected in the duplicate analyses will be calculated and 
compared to the previously established acceptance criteria (See 
Section 4.2.2) . 

4.3.4.5 Matrix Spike Duplicate Sample 

In some instances, a matrix spike duplicate sample is 
analyzed as opposed to a duplicate sample. Typically the matrix 
spike (MS) and matrix spike duplicate (MSD) are extracted and/or 
analyzed as a set, one set for every twenty samples of the same 
matrix. The recovery of the spiked analytes from both the MS and 
MSD are determined and used to assess the method accuracy as it 
relates to the specific matrix. Also, the RPDs between the 
concentration found for each spiked analyte in the MS/MSD 
analyses will be calculated to assess the precision of the method 
based on the matrix being tested. Control charts will be 
generated to establish acceptable limits of recovery and RPDs for 
the MS and MSD analyses. 

It should be noted that for some analyses, as in GC/MS 
methods, where there are a large number of compounds being 
analyzed, it is not practical to produce recoveries and RPDs for 
every analyte. In these cases, a select number of analytes, 
usually specified in the method, will be spiked into the MS/MSD 
samples and the recoveries and RPDs of these analytes will be 
used to assess accuracy and precision. 






( 



( 






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4.3.4.6 Documentation of Quality Control Analyses 

The analysis of quality control samples must be recorded and 
submitted with the sample data for review. The results are 
compared to the established acceptance criteria so as to document 
that the extraction and analysis scheme was in control when the 
site samples were analyzed. This is necessary for final approval 
and release of the analytic results of any site sample. 

4.3.5 Establishment of Acceptance Criteria 

The establishment of acceptance criteria is necessary in 
order to be able to determine regularly whether or not 
quantitative data generated by the laboratory is within control 
limits. The following section discusses the parameters for which 
acceptance criteria must be established. 

4.3.5.1 Method Blanks 

Method blanks are used to establish a known baseline level 
of contamination which may be contributed from four principal 
sources, namely: 

1. The environment the analysis is performed in 

2. The reagents used in the analysis 

3 . The apparatus used 

4. The analyst performing the analysis 

A method blank which results in any analyte concentration 
above the quantitation limit will be deemed unacceptable unless 
the concentration of the analyte found in the sample is less than 
the quantitation limit. 

4.3.5.2 Recovery of Spiked Blank Samples 

Spiked blank samples are used to establish the accuracy of 
the method as previously discussed in Section 4.2.1. Initially 
four replicate spiked blank samples are prepared. They are then 
extracted and analyzed following precisely the appropriate 
protocol, and the concentrations of the analytes are determined. 
From these values, the mean and standard deviation for the 
recovery of each analyte are determined. The deviation of the 
mean from the known spiked amount is a measure of accuracy of the 
method and is expressed as percent recovery of the analyte. The 
percent recovery is calculated as follows: 



R = 100 x 



C (m) - C (b) 
C (s) 



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Where, R = Percent recovery of the analyte 

C (m) = The measured concentration of the analyte 

C (b) = The background concentration of the analyte in 
the sample (For spiked blank samples C (b) = 0) 

C (s) = The actual concentration of analyte spiked into 
the sample 

The mean and standard deviations of the recoveries of each 
analyte are then calculated and compared to the criteria found in 
the appropriate EPA method. Upon meeting EPA criteria, control 
charts for each analyte will be generated from the recoveries of 
twenty spiked blank sample analyses. 

For gas chromatography methods, the appropriate internal and 
surrogate spike standards should be added to all spiked reagent 
blanks and samples. Again, acceptable recovery limits should be 
compared to the recoveries listed in the QA/QC section of the 
appropriate EPA method. 

4.3.5.3 Duplicate Analyses 

Non-spiked samples or matrix spike samples will be extracted 
in duplicate and the resultant concentrations for each analyte 
will be used to establish the precision of the method. Once 
again, precision is defined as a measure of the differences from 
the mean of repetitive measurements. Thus the standard deviation 
will be used as a measure of precision. More frequently, the 
relative percent difference will be used because at best, 
measurements are performed in duplicate. The relative percent 
difference is determined by the equation: 

x (1) - x (2) 
% RPD = 100 x 

x (m) 

where, x (1) = High value for the analyte 

x (2) = Low value for the analyte 

x (m) = Mean value for the analyte = x(l) + x(2) 

2 

The results of the determinations of relative percent 
differences will be plotted, in the form of a control 



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chart, indicating the upper control limit of acceptance and the 
upper warning limit. The control charts will be kept in the 
method file for reference and future data will be considered 
acceptable if the relative percent differences of duplicates fall 
within the acceptance criteria. 

4.3.5.4 Spiked Sample Analyses 

Samples will be spiked with a known amount of the 
appropriate analytes. The resultant recoveries of each analyte 
will be used to establish the accuracy of the method based on the 
matrix being analyzed. From these values the mean and standard 
deviation for the recovery of each analyte added to the matrix 
will be determined. The recoveries will be calculated using the 
same equation used for spiked blank samples (Section 4.3.5.2). 
When the recoveries of twenty spiked samples of the same matrix 
have been determined, the mean and standard deviation will be 
calculated and a control chart will be generated for each spiked 
analyte. Future data will be considered acceptable if the 
recoveries of the spiked analytes fall within the acceptance 
criteria . 

4.3.5.5 Use of Surrogates 

Surrogates are compounds that are expected to behave 
analytically in a manner similar to target analytes. The 
surrogates are added into the sample prior to extraction and 
their recoveries are a measure of the efficiency of the 
extraction . 

The use of surrogates in organic analysis serves as an 
additional measure of the acceptability of the results. The 
significant advantage of the use of surrogates is in measuring 
recovery against the historically established acceptance range in 
the performance of each analysis. Thus, data does not depend 
solely on the spiked blank sample to assess the quality of each 
analytical run. 

The acceptable ranges of surrogate recoveries are 
established based on the recoveries of thirty sample analyses. 
The mean and standard deviations from these thirty surrogate 
recoveries are used to determine the upper and lower acceptable 
limits of surrogate recoveries as previously discussed (See 
Section 4.2.1). Surrogate recoveries also need to be established 
based on the type of matrix and the method of extraction. All 
subsequent surrogate recoveries will be considered acceptable if 
the recoveries fall within these established acceptance ranges. 



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NOTE: Acceptance criteria must be established for each 
method of extraction and for each matrix type. Recoveries from 
soil are not expected to be within the acceptance limits as 
determined for water, and recoveries from sonication extraction 
may not show the same recovery as would a soxhlet extraction. 
Thus, acceptance criteria must be determined matrix by matrix and 
method by method. 

4.3.5.6 Retention Times in Gas Chromatography Methods 

While accuracy and precision form the backbone of 
quantitative data, qualitative identification in GC methods is 
more difficult to translate into quantitative measures. The 
principle criterion for chromatographic analysis is the retention 
time, or relative retention time. Relative retention time is used 
in those methods employing internal standards. It is a more 
reliable measure because it is less dependent on such physical 
parameters as the length of the column. In all cases, the 
relative retention time for each analyte will be based on the 
data obtained from the nearest standard. 

To determine the acceptance window for retention times, the 
continuing calibration data will be employed. For each compound, 
the retention times obtained in performing the continuing 
calibrations over a 72 hour (minimum) period will be averaged and 
their standard deviations determined (See Figure 4-3). The 
acceptance window will consist of three standard deviations from 
the mean retention time for each compound. The retention time 
acceptance windows will be redetermined whenever the 
chromatographic column is changed or the chromatographic 
conditions are altered. It is the responsibility of the analyst 
to maintain the records for retention time criteria. These 
records are kept in the method file for future reference. In mass 
spectrometric analysis, in addition to retention time, the mass 
spectral match of the compound to the standard will be used to 
verify its identity. 

4.3.6 Standard Operating Procedures 

All standard laboratory and analytical procedures will be 
written as Standard Operating Procedures (SOP's). SOPs will be 
available in the laboratory for the analysts and will serve as a 
comprehensive source of reference. General laboratory procedures 
covered by SOP's will include: 

1. External Chain of Custody procedures 

2. Internal Chain of Custody procedures 

3. Samples shipping/receipt procedures 



ULWSTCSTTfciJm 



Section No. : 4 
Issue Date: 1/24/96 
Page No. : 21 

4 . Sample storage procedures 

5. Sample destruction/waste disposal procedures 

6. Cleaning procedures for sample containers and 
laboratory glassware 

7. A laboratory health and safety plan 

Analytical SOP's should include: 

1. References to standard methodologies 

2. Scope and Applications 

3 . Summary of Method 

4. Safety precautions 

5. Materials and Apparatus, including 
instrumentation used & instrument parameters 

6. Reagents and standards used including 
preparation of standards, 

7. Calibration procedures and acceptability 
criteria 

8. Corrective action procedures 

9. Sample preparation (may be a separate SOP) 

10. Analytical procedures 

11. Calculations 

12. Types and frequencies of quality control 
sample analysis 

13. Preventive maintenance procedures 

14 . Reporting requirements 

15. Sample preservation, storage and holding 
times 

16. Interferences/cleanup procedures 

4.4 QA/QC Schedules 

As stated in Sections 4.3.3 and 4.3.4, most analyses will 
require calibration and the analysis of QC samples. Listed below 
are the QA/QC schedules of the various types of analyses 
performed in the WST laboratories. See Table 4-5. 

4.4.1 Non-instrumental Wet Chemistry Analyses 

Total Suspended Solids is an example of this type of 
analysis. The QA/QC required for these analyses are: a method 
blank and a duplicate analysis for every batch of twenty or fewer 
samples; and, if available, external QC sample analysis. For 
analyses which require an analytical balance, the balance will be 
checked daily for accuracy with two Class S weights near the 
weight range applicable to the method. 






( 



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t 



Section No. : 4 
Issue Date: 1/24/96 
Page No. : 2 2 

4.4.2 Instrumental Analyses 

4.4.2.1 Non-GC Instrumental Analyses 

Total petroleum hydrocarbon determination by infrared 
spectrophotometry is an example of this type of analysis. 
Requirements for this type of analysis are: initial calibration; 
daily continuing calibration; reference samples, one for every 
ten samples analyzed; method blank and duplicate analyses, one 
per every batch of twenty samples or less; and when available, 
external QC samples. For metals analysis and some wet chemistry 
analyses, matrix spike and, in some instances MSD, will also be 
performed. 

4.4.2.2 GC and GC/MS Analyses 

GC and GC/MS analyses require the following: initial 
calibration; daily continuing calibration; reference samples, one 
per every ten samples; method blanks, one per every batch of 
twenty or fewer samples; matrix spike and matrix spike duplicate 
samples, one for every twenty samples of the same matrix; 
surrogates and internal standards (when applicable) , added to 
each standard and sample analysis; and external QC samples. 
Matrix spikes and matrix spike duplicates may also be analyzed 
according to project specific requirements. 

The QA/QC requirements for each analysis are detailed in the 
corresponding analytical SOP. 

4.5 Instrumentation 

Table 4-3 lists the instrumentation and equipment available 
at Waste Stream Technology's Analytical Laboratory. 

4 . 6 Audits 

WST employs four types of audits to measure performance, 
define problem areas, and ensure conformance and compliance with 
formalized certification programs. 

4.6.1 External Audits 

External audits are performed by certifying agencies or 
clients through the use of performance evaluation samples and/or 
on-site inspections. Potential clients are welcome to audit the 
WST laboratory and submit evaluation samples as necessary. 






Section No. : 4 
Issue Date: 1/24/96 
Page No. : 2 3 



4.6.2 System Audits 



System audits are primary responsibility of the QA/QC 
Officer. System audits evaluate the procedures and documentation 
in the laboratory. A system audit checks for conformity to the QA 
plan and the SOP criteria for an analysis. Items covered include, 
but are not limited to, sample custody procedures, calibration 
frequency and checking, quality control, data reduction and 
validation, method validation (startup QC) , and record keeping 
and retention. The entire range of analyses performed by the 
laboratory is reviewed as least annually by the QA/QC Officer. 
Quarterly audits are conducted by the QA/QC Officer in the 
company of the Laboratory Director and Assistant Lab Director. 

4.6.3 Report Audit 

Report audits evaluate the correctness and appearance of the 
laboratory reports and are performed routinely by the QA/QC 
Officer. The report audit assures that the data reported is of 
consistent quality and content. 

4.6.4 Blind Sample Audit 

Blind sample audits are conducted by submitting samples of 
known concentrations through ordinary sample handling procedures 
and comparing the reported concentrations with the known values. 
Blind sample audits are carried out annually. 



ULWSnSTB£iJm 



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Table 4-1 
STANDARD and SOLUTION HOLDING TIMES 



MATERIAL 


HOLDING TIME 
Pure Compound 


HOLDING TIME 
Stock Solution 


HOLDING TIME 
Working Sol'n. 


Volatiles 
GC & GC/MS 


1 year §-10°C 


1 month §-10°C* 


1 month @-10°C b 


Semivolatiles 
GC & GC/MS 


1 year @4°C 


1 year §-lO°C 


6 months @4°C 


TPH for IR 


1 year §4°C 


6 months @4°C 


3 months §4°C 


TPH for GC 


1 year @-10°C 


6 months @-10°C 


3 months §-lO°C 


Metals for 
ICP & GFAA 


1 year 6 


1 year 6 


3 months 6 



> 



Pre-prepared standard in an unopened ampule: expiration date 
on ampule @ -10°C. Opened ampules: 1 mo @ -10°C. For gases: 
1 week after opening. 

Except gases: 1 week @ -10°C. 

10% HMO, for ICP; 2% HN0 3 for GFAA. 



UU dSTTESTRfgn 



( 



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> 



Table 4-2 
Calibration Frequencies 



Instrument Application Initial Calibration 
GC/MS Volatiles Once/Month' 



GC/MS 



GC 



GC 



ICP 



Semivolatiles 



Volatiles 



Extracts 



Metals 



pH Meter Aqueous 
Solutions 



Once/Month" 



Once/Month' 



Once/Month' 



Once/Month' 



Daily 



Continuing Calibration 
Every twelve hours and at the 
end of a sequence of runs 

Every twelve hours and at the 
end of a sequence of runs 

Every twelve hours and at the 
end of a sequence of runs 

Every twelve hours and at the 
end of a sequence of runs 

Daily Graphite AA Metals Once/ 
Month' Daily 

Every ten tests at the end of a 
sequence of tests 



Infrared Total Petroleum 
Spectro- Hydrocarbons 
photometer 



Once/6 months Every run of samples 



Balances: 

Analytical Weighing of Weekly 

samples & standards 

Top-loader Weighing of Monthly 

samples & standards 



Daily 



Daily 



' After repair, column change, or failure on continuing calibration check and/or quality 
control check standard. As long as continuing calibration analyses and reference 
sample recoveries pass criteria, initial calibration will remain acceptable. 



OWSTISTREiSm 



( 



) 



Table 4-3.1 
INSTRUMENT AND EQUIPMENT LIST 
GC/MS: 

Hewlett-Packard Model 5890 Series II GC with: 

- capillary split/splitless injector 

- Model 5970B Mass Selective Detector (MSD) with direct 
capillary interface 

- HP MSDOS Chemstation for complete operation of GC/MS 

- Model 7376A Autosampler 

Hewlett-Packard Model 5890 Series II GC with: 

- packed column injector with jet separator 

- Model 5971A Mass Selective Detector (MSD) 

- HP MSDOS Chemstation for control of GC Data 
Acquisition, and Data Reduction 

- Tekmar Model LSC 2000 Purge and Trap Concentrator 

- Tekmar Model 2016 Purge and Trap Autosampler 

Hewlett-Packard Model 5890 Series II GC with: 

- capillary split/spiltless injector 

- Model 5972 Mass Seletive Detector (MSD) 

- HP MSDOS Chemstation for complete operation of GC/MS 

- Model 7376B Autosampler 

Hewlett-Packard Model 5890 Series II GC with: 

- capillary split/splitless injector 

- Model 5972 Mass Selective Detector (MSD) 

- HP MSDOS Chemstation for complete operation of GC/MS 

- Tekmar Model LSC 3000 Purge and Trap Concentrator 

- Tekmar Model 2016 Purge and Trap Autosampler 

GC: 

Hewlett-Packard Model 5890 Series II GC with: 

- Dual capillary split/splitless injectors. 

- Model 7673B Autosampler 

- Dual ECD detectors 

- IBM compatable 486dx33 computer with PE Nelson 
Turbochrome Software 

Perkin-Elmer Model 8500 Dual Channel GC with: 

- single packed column injector with purge and trap 
interface 

- Perkin-Elmer Model 2600 PC Integrator (Only one is 
required since it can acquire data from 15 GC channels 
simultaneously) 

- Tekmar Model LSC 2000 Purge and Trap Concentrator 

- Tekmar Model ALS 2016 16 Place Autosampler 

- PID and Hall detectors connected in series 

Perkin-Elmer Model Autosystem Gas Chromatograph "with: 

- Autosampler 

- Capillary Columns 

- Dual ECD Dectectors 

- Dual split/splitless injector ports 



ULWSTESTTtoJm 



1 



IR: 



Table 4-3.2 

Perkin-Elmer Model Autosystem Gas Chromatography with: 

- Autosampler 

- Capillary Columns 

- ECD and FID Dectectors 

- Dual split/splitless injector ports 

Perkin-Elmer Model 1310 Dispersive Infrared 
Spectrophotometer with: 

- scan range of 4000 to 600 cm - 1 wavenumbers 

- fixed or variable wavelength 

Metals Analysis: 

Perkin-Elmer Model 4100ZL Atomic Absorption Spectrometer 
with: 

- Transversely Heated Graphite Atomizer (THGA) Perkin- 
Elmer Plasma 400 Spectrometer with AS-90 Autosampler 

Leeman AP200 Automated Mercury Preparation System 

Leeman PS200 Automated Mercury Analyzer 

Buck Scientific Atomic Absorption/Emission 
Spectrophotometer. 

Buck Scientific Model-420 Hydride Continuous Flow Analyzer. 

CEM Model MDS-2100 Microwave Sample Preparation System 
Spectrophotometers : 

Beckman Model 25 UV/Vis Spectrophotometer and Chart Recorder 

Milton Roy Spectronic 20-D 

TCLP Equipment: 

Heat Systems Model W-385 & Model XL2020 Ultrasonic 
Processors 

Zymark Model ZW 640-3 TurboVap Automated Nitrogen 
Evaporator/ Concentrator 

Associated Design and Manufacturing Model 3740-24-BRE 24 
Place Rotary Agitator 

Associated Design and Manufacturing Model 3740-6-BRE Six 
Place Rotary Agitator and Millipore Zero Headspace 



UWSTISTRfcJm 



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Table 4-3.3 
Extractors: 

Soxhlet Extraction Apparatus including: 

- Neslab Model CFT-75 Refrigerated Recirculator 

- Precision 6 unit Heater 

- Electromantle Model EM 250/C Heating Mantle (12 units; 6 
for soxhlet extractors and 6 for distillation) 

- Soxhlet Extractors and Condensers (13 sets) 

Gel Permeation Chromatography Equipment: 

Zymark BenchMate Workstation 

Scientific Systems Model 300 LC Pump 

Kontes Column 

Foxy 200 Fraction Collector 

Isco UA-6 LTV/Vis Detector 
Flashpoint Tester: 

Pensky-Martins Closed Cup Flashpoint Tester 

Balances : 

Mettler Model H33 Analytical Balance, 160g capacity at 
O.OOOlg readability 

Mettler Model PN323 Top Loading Balance, 320g capacity at 
O.OOlg readability 

Fisher Model XD4000 Top Loading Balance, 400g/100g capacity 
at O.Olg/O.OOlg readability 

Fisher Model XD800 Top Loading Balance, 800g capacity at 
0.01 readability 

Centrifuges: 

Sharpies ARE 15MV Super Centrifuge, Vaportite Design 

Jouan Model CR4-11 Bench Top Refrigerated Centrifuge 

Sorvall RC2-B Super Speed Centrifuge, Refrigerated Floor 

Model 

Fisher Microcentrifuge 



UWSTESTR£dm 



Table 4-3.4 



pH Meters: 



Markson Model 93 Portable pH meter, 0.0 to 12.0 range at 
0.01 readability 

Soiltest Model 425-500 pH meter, 0.0 to 14.0 range at 0.01 
readability 

Cole Parmer Model L-01489-30 Conductivity Meter 
Ovens/ Incubators: 

Fisher Model 349 Isotemp Oven 

Fisher Model 630F Isotemp Oven 

Fisher Model 655F Isotemp Oven 

AC-Lab 15 cu.ft. Incubator 

Water Purification Equipment: 

Deionized Pre-treatment System fed into a D8904 High 
Capacity Activated Carbon Filter or into a Milli-Q Water 
Purification System 

Microscopes : 

American Optical Light Microscope 

Shaker Tables 

New Brunswick Scientific Gyratory Shaker 

Labline Orbit Shaker Table 

Adams Nutator 

Freezers, Freeze-Driers & Refrigerators: 

So-Low Environmental Chest Freezer (to-150°C) 

Labconco Freeze Dry-5 Lyophilizer 

18 cu.ft. Refrigerator Freezers (5) 

Fisher Isotemp Refrigerator Circulator 

Scienceware Frigimat Dry Ice Maker 

14 cu.ft. Freezers (3) 

216 cu. ft. Walk-in Coldroom 



ULWSTCSTR£i*T1 



Table 4-3.5 
Laminar Flow Hoods: 

Flow Laboratories Gel Aire AIRONE Hoods (3) 

Laminar Flow Hoods (9) 
Autoclave - All American Electric Pressure Steam Sterilizer 
Computer Equipment: 

IBM 335 AT (11) 

IBM PS-2 Model 80 

IBM 486 AT (14) 

HP Plotter 7475A 

HP Vectra 386/25 

Apple Macintosh LC 
Electrophoresis Equipment: 

Gel Apparati 

- Hoefer Large and Small Vertical Gel Apparatus 

- Hoefer Large and Small Horizontal Gel Apparatus 

Power Supplies 

- IBI Full Range Digital Power Supply 

- Fisher Power Supplies (3) 

Fisher U.V. Transilluminator 












t 



) 



> 



Table 4-4 

ANALYTICAL METHODS 

The procedures employed by WST for the analysis of samples 
are taken from a variety of references. These analytical methods 
are condensed in the SOP's used in the laboratory. Specific 
method reference materials are also included. 

Analytical procedures employed are based on the following: 

1 . Methods for Chemical Analysis of Water and Wastes. 
EPA 600/4-79-020, March 1979, Revised 1983, U.S. 
Environmental Monitoring and Support Laboratory, 
Cincinnati, Ohio 45268. 

2 . Federal Register. 40 CFR Part 136: Guidelines 
Establishing Test Procedures for the Analysis of 
Pollutants Under the Clean Water Act . Revised July 
1991. 

3 . Test Methods for Evaluating Solid Waste: 
Physical/Chemical Methods . Third Edition, Revised 
July 1992, United States EPA SW-846. 

4. Superfund Contract Laboratory Program. U.S. 
Environmental Protection Agency, Environmental 
Monitoring and Support Laboratory, Las Vegas, 
Nevada. SOW for Inorganic and Organic Analysis 
#ILM03.0 and #OLM03.0. 

5. Annual Book of ASTM Standards, Volume II. ASTM, 
1916 Race Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
19103. 

6 . Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and 
Wastewater. (18th Edition). American Public Health 
Association, 1105 18th Street, NW, Washington, 
D.C. 20036. 

7 . Methods for Organic Chemical Analysis of Municipal 
and Industrial Wastewater. EPA 600/4-82-057, July 
1932, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 
Environmental Monitoring and Support Laboratory, 
Cincinnati, Ohio 45268. 

8 . Verification of PCB Spill Cleanup bv Sampling and 
Analysis. EPA 560/5-85-026, August, 1985, U.S. 
Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Toxic 
Substances, Washington, D.C. 



uwsTTsre£i*n 



Table 4-5 
Schedule of Analysis for Quality Control Samples 



Analysis 


Method 


Method 
Blanks 


Duplicate 


Matrix 
Spike 


Surro- 
gate 


QC 
Ref. 


GC-Purgaablaa 


601-602 


Daily 


5%* 


10% 


100% 


10%" 


GC/MS-Purgeablaa 


624 


Daily 


5%* 


5% 


100% 


10%" 


GCPaaticidea/PCB 


608 


PB 


5%* 


10% 


100% 


10%" 


Samivolatilea 


625 


PB 


5%* 


5% 


100% 


10%" 


Oil & Graaaa 


413.1 


PB 


5%* 


10% 


N/A 


10% 


Patroleum Hydro. 


418.1 


PB 


5% 


10% 


N/A 


10% 


GCPurgaablea 


8010/20 


Daily 


PB/5%* 


PB/5% 


100% 


PB5% 


GC/MS-Purgaablea 


8240/60 


Daily 


PB/5%* 


PB/5% 


100% 


PB5% 


GC-Pe»ticida«.'PC3 


8080 


PB 


PB/5%* 


PB/5% 


100% 


PB5% 


GC/MS Semivolatile* 


8270 


PB 


PB/5%* 


PB/5% 


100% 


PB5% 


Patrolaum Hydro. 


3550 
418.1 
SM503 
8015 


PB 


PB/5% 


PB/5% 


N/A; 
100%£ 


PB5% 


GC/MS-Purgaables 


624-CLP 


Daily 


PB/5%* 


PB/5% 


100% 


PB5% 


GC-Pasticidas,PC3 


608-CLP 


PB 


PB/5%* 


PB/5% 


100% 


PB5% 


GC/MS SairUvolatilaa 


625-CLP 


PB 


PB/5%* 


PB/5% 


100% 


PB5% 


Matals 


200.7 


PB 


PB/10%* 


PB10% 


NA 


PB10* 


ICP 


6010 


PB 


PB/10%* 


PB10% 


NA 


PB10 % 



PB - per batch 

PB/5% - one QC sample per analytical batch or 5%, whichever is greater 

PB/10% - one QC sample per analytical batch or 10%, whichever is greater 

* Duplicate matrix spikes may replace duplicate samples 

* *QC Reference Samples will also be analyzed after every matrix spike outside 
control limits. 

ft 8015 (modified) 
N/A - Not Applicable 



UWSTESTB£dm 

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Figure 4-1 

Hethod 8240 Uater MS/MSD Recovery Charts 
benzene 



120- 
110- 

100- 

90- 
80- 




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DATE: 



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Figure 4-2 

Method 8240 Uater HS/TISD RPD Charts 
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1 



Section : 5 

Issue Date : 1/24/96 

Page No. : 1 



DATA HANDLING 



Since the objective of Waste Stream Technology's Analytical 
Laboratory is the production of data of known, documented 
quality, it is of the utmost importance that all the data 
regarding each sample is recorded and reduced in an accurate and 
precise manner. The greatest responsibilities to the production 
of this data are with the individual extraction technicians and 
analysts. They are, after all, the producers of the data. This 
section will address the procedures of handling the data. This 
section will also deal with the procedures used by the extraction 
technicians and the analysts for record keeping and ultimately, 
the traceability of the data within the laboratory. This section 
will then be followed by a brief discussion of data reduction, 
validation, review, and final reporting. 

5.1 Record Keeping in the Laboratory 

As mentioned in Section 3.4, Sample Custody in the 
Laboratory, the samples are logged into the Labworks LIMS 
database which is then used to track the progress of the samples 
through out the analytical process. The traceability of a sample 
or group of samples which require extraction prior to analysis 
begins with the sample preparation logbook. 

5.1.1 Sample Preparation Logbooks 

The sample preparation logbooks are hard covered and bound 
notebooks with prenumbered pages. The following information must 
be recorded into these logbooks: 

1. The date of extraction and the initials of the 
technician performing the extraction. 

2. The identification numbers of the surrogate, internal 
and reference sample standards used in the extraction. 

3 . The method of extraction used and the subsequent method 
of analysis to be performed. 

4. The QA/QC Batch Number. This alphanumeric number is 
used to track all the samples associated with the 
corresponding method blank, spiked blank, duplicate 
sample, and matrix spike samples which were extracted 
with this group of samples. The number consists of the 
method number of the analysis to be performed on the 
sample extract followed by: the date of extraction, in 
the form ddmmyr; the initials of the extraction 
technician; the method number of extraction used; and 
then a -1, -2, -3, etcetera for the first, second, or 
third batch of samples extracted for that method of 









e 



Section : 5 

Issue Date : 1/24/96 

Page No. : 2 

analysis on the same day. PCB and pesticide analyses 
will use the Julian Calendar date for identifying the 
QA/QC batch. This number is extremely important since 
it will be use to identify the QA/QC sample associated 
with the site samples extracted within the same sample 
batch. 

5. The WST sample ID number of each sample extracted and 
the weight or volume of sample extracted. 

6. The final volume of extract. 

7. The volume of reference sample standard added to the 
spiked blank sample and the volume of surrogate and/or 
internal standard added to each sample or sample 
extract. 

8. The WST sample ID number of the sample selected for 
matrix spike analysis, the volume of matrix spike 
added, and ID number of the matrix spike standard used. 

9. Any comments or observations on occurrences during the 
extraction procedure, especially if they may effect the 
results of the data generated. 

10. The lot number and manufacturer of the solvents used to 
extract the samples and the ID number of each reagent 
used. 

Upon completion of the extraction, the extracts and a 
photocopy of the sample preparation logbook will be given to the 
appropriate analyst. The copy of the preparation logbook will 
then be submitted by the analyst as part of the data package for 
review. 

5.1.2 Wet Chemistry Logbooks 

Since the preparation of samples for wet chemistry analyses 
is typically not as involved as the extraction of samples for 
organic or metals analyses, the preparation and analysis data for 
wet chemistry analyses will be recorded in the same logbook. Each 
wet chemistry analysis will have its own individual logbook 
designed to record all the data pertinent to that analysis, 
including, the date of analysis, the initials of the technician 
performing the analysis, the WST sample ID numbers being 
analyzed, the final results obtained for each sample analyzed, 
the results of all QC sample analyses, and the lot number or ID 
number of the reagents and standards used for the analysis. Some 
of the other records kept in association with the wet chemistry 
analyses, such as reagent preparation, may be maintained in 
separate notebooks. 

All notebooks used to record wet chemistry data are bound 
with hard covers and have prenumbered pages. They are issued to 
the analysts by the QA/QC Officer. The QA/QC Officer assigns each 



UWSTESTP£^T1 



) 



Section : 5 

Issue Date : 1/24/96 

Page No. : 3 

notebook a number and records the date of issuance, the notebook 
title and the name of the analyst to whom the notebook was issued 
along side of this number on a Notebook Distribution Sheet which 
he/she maintains. 

Users of the notebook will maintain good laboratory 
practices in their use. All entries will be made with indelible 
ink. No pages will be torn out of the notebook. Corrections will 
be made by marking a single horizontal line through the mistake, 
followed by initializing and dating the correction. Tape or 
liquid paper will not be permitted when making corrections. 

5.1.3 Record Keeping In Instrumental Analysis 

The analysis of samples by GC, GC/MS, ICP, and graphite 
furnace AA will be documented using an analysis sequence log. The 
sequence log may be in the form of a notebook or a computer 
generated log sheet that is filed in an analysis sequence binder. 
In either case, the analysis log must contain, at a minimum, the 
following information; 

1. The date of the analysis. 

2. The WST sample ID numbers analyzed. 

3. The ID of the instrument used for the analysis. Each 
instrument will have its own analysis sequence log. 

4. The ID numbers of the initial, continuing or QC check 
standards used through out the analysis sequence. In 
the case of GC/MS analyses, the tune standard ID number 
must also be recorded. 

5. The ID numbers of the QC samples analyzed in the 
sequence . 

6. The dilution factor, if the sample required dilution 
prior to analysis. 

7. The name of the data file associated with each analysis 
of the sequence (For ICP and graphite furnace AA there 
is only one date file name for the entire analysis 
sequence) . 

The analysis log must show the sequence in which the samples 
standards and QC samples were analyzed. The log may also contain 
data used in the reduction of data to obtain final results such 
as sample weights or volumes and final extraction volumes. 

For GC/MS analyses, the analysis logbook also contains the 
retention time, area found and the percent area recovery for all 
of the internal standards as well as the recovery of each 
surrogate compound added to the analyses. 

Upon completion of the analysis, the analyst will enter the 
sample results into the Labworks database using the appropriate 



UWSTESTREdm 






Section : 5 

Issue Date : 1/24/96 

Page No. : 4 

analysis code. Data entry is performed either manually or by 
computer file transfer. The analyst will also enter the results 
of method blank, reference sample, matrix spike, and duplicate or 
matrix spike duplicate sample analyses into Labworks for review. 

A copy of the analysis log or notebook will be submitted as 
part of the data package for review. The data package will also 
include a copy of the preparation log, the hard copy print outs 
of all continuing calibration standard, QC sample and site sample 
analyses and, for soils, a copy of the percent solids log. A 
copy of the Labworks backlog report that indicates which samples 
are contained within the data package will also be submitted. 

5.2 Data Reduction 

Reducing the data to a reportable form is the responsibility 
of the analyst performing the analysis. It is of utmost 
importance that the analyst pay close attention to the data being 
reduced by him or her since the data is only spot checked beyond 
analysis. In reducing the data generated by an analysis, the 
analyst must review the following: 

1. The continuing calibration analysis to assess the 
validity of the current calibration. 

2. The method blank analysis to assure that no analyte 
concentrations are above the method detection limit. 

3. The recoveries of each of the analytes from the 
reference sample analysis to assure that they meet 
acceptable criteria. 

4. The concentration of each integrated analyte to assess 
if the concentration has exceeded the upper linear 
range, making further dilution of the sample or sample 
extract necessary, or if the concentrations are below 
the detection limit. In this later case, reanalysis of 
the sample may be necessary using either: a larger 
aliquot of the sample extract for analysis; a non- 
diluted aliquot of the sample; or in the case of soils, 
whether the low level extraction method should be 
employed . 

For GC and GC/MS analyses the following must also be 
reviewed: 

1. The retention times of each of the integrated analytes 
to assure that they are within the acceptable windows 
and that the analyte peaks were correctly identified. 

2. The integration of each analyte peak. 

3. For GC/MS analyses, the tuning standard must be 
reviewed to assure that it meets acceptable criteria. 



uwsresTB£i*n 



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Section : 5 

Issue Date : 1/24/96 

Page No. : 5 

4. For GC/MS analyses, the spectrum of each identified 
peak must be verified to assure that it meets 
acceptable criteria. 

When the above reviews are completed and satisfactory, the 
concentration of each analyte in the sample can be determined 
using the following calculation: 

I I Ve 

C = x x x DF 

RF Vi As 

where, C = Concentration of the analyte in the sample, in 

appropriate units [M9/L (ppb) , mg/L (ppm) , or M9/Kg 
(ppb) , mg/Kg (ppm) ] 



T = 



Signal size, in units appropriate to the method 






RF = The response factor, in units of signal size per 
unit weight of the analyte. This response factor is 
essentially a mean response factor determined through 
regression of the initial calibration curve. 

vi = The aliquot size of the prepared sample taken for 
analysis, in units of ml. For some analyses this value 
id 1 since the same volume is used for initial 
calibration and for sample analyses. 

Ve = The total volume of the prepared sample in ml. 

As = The amount of sample taken for preparation. For 
liquid samples, the volume in liters is used; for solid 
samples, use the weight in Kg. If the results are to be 
determined on the basis of dry weight, use the 
following to determine sample size: 



As (dry) = As (wet) x 



% Solids 
100 






DF = Dilution factor. The dilution factor is 1 for 
samples that are prepared exactly as prescribed in the 
protocol. If the soil or water extract required 
dilution, then the dilution factor differs from unity. 
For example, if an extract is diluted from 1 ml to 10 
ml, the dilution factor becomes 10. 

In most instrumental analyses, a computer is used that will 
automatically calculate the ratio I/RF for each analyte from the 
current calibration table or linear regression curve based on the 



ULWsnsTRfdm 



L 



- 



Section : 5 

Issue Date : 1/24/96 

Page No. : 6 

initial calibration. The I/RF ratio is given in units of 
weight for each of the analytes found in the volume of sample 
analyzed. These weights are then either used manually or entered 
into a second computer program along with the values for Vi, Ve, 
As (usually dry weightfor soils) , and DF obtained from the 
preparation and analysis logs, to calculate C for each analyte 
found in the sample. 

Although computerized data reduction alleviates the need for 
extensive manual data reduction, at least five percent of the 
results from each batch of results will be checked by the QA/QC 
Officer during data review, using manual calculations to verify 
that the data was correctly reduced. These calculations will be 
signed and dated as proof of the review. 

5.3 Data Validation 

Before data from an analytic batch can be incorporated into 
reports, it must be validated by the QA/QC Officer through the 
review of all the data associated with the analytic batch. The 
QA/QC Officer checks each batch for completeness, accuracy, and 
precision. 

Although it is not the responsibility of the QA/QC Officer 
to check and verify every value generated and reported from the 
analyses, he or she will check the items listed below, using a 
checklist to document the review. Figure 5-1 shows the form which 
is used for the review of organic analysis data while Figure 5-2 
shows the form used for the review of metals analysis data. 

1. Is the batch complete? 

2. Have all the analyses been performed within the 
holding times of the samples? 

3. Is there a valid continuing calibration for each 
analyte associated with the analyses of the 
individual samples within the batch? 

4. For metals analyses, is there a valid initial 
calibration curve for each analyte and v/ere 
initial calibration verification, interference 
check and guality control check standards analyzed 
where appropriate? 

5. For GC/MS analyses, is there a valid tune analysis 
associated with the sample batch? 

6. Is the sequence of runs in which the samples were 
analyzed proper for the method? Were method 
blanks, continuing calibrations, duplicates, 
matrix spikes, and spiked blanks run within the 
frequency listed in the method? 



LLWSTE STREET! 



Section : 5 

Issue Date : 1/24/96 

Page No. : 7 

7. For GC and GC/MS analyses, are the surrogate 

recoveries from the samples within established 
control limits for the sample matrix analyzed? If 
not, has the sample preparation and analysis been 
repeated, and have recoveries been acceptable in 
the repeated analysis? 

3. Is the recovery of spiked compounds in the 
reference sample acceptable? 

9. Is the recovery of the spiked compounds in the 
matrix spike sample acceptable? If not, has there 
been an acceptable explanation or a repeat of the 
analysis? 

10. Do duplicate analyses in the run sequence exhibit 
precision within the control limits? 

11. Is the documentation in order? Are dates, QA/QC 
Batch Numbers, standard ID numbers, and reagent 
information complete? 

If the answer to all of the above questions is "yes", the 
QA/QC Officer can release the data for reporting. The QA/QC 
Officer will also check the results for each sample in the 
Labworks database to assure that it is correct since the results 
from Labworks will be used to generate the finalized result 
report . 

If the answer to any of the above questions is "no", 
corrective actions will be initiated by the QA/QC Officer in 
association with the analyst. If, after implementation of 
corrective actions, all criteria are met, the data can then be 
released for reporting. If some criteria are not met, the batch 
can be released, depending on what is not met and if there is 
sufficient explanation. However, regardless of the rationale, 
data will not be released if the following conditions exist: 

1. GC/MS did not meet tuning criteria 

2. Continuing calibration was not performed or 
did not meet acceptance criteria. 

3. Reference sample analysis (spiked blanks) did 
not meet acceptance criteria. 

4. The data set was not complete. 

Corrective actions for these situations will be addressed in 
Section 6.0, Corrective Actions. 

Once the QA/QC Officer reviews and approves the data, he or 
she will sign off on the checklist, attach it to the data package 
and submit the data to the Data Coordinator. 



uusnsn*£dm 






Section : 5 

Issue Date : 1/24/96 

Page No. : 8 



5.4 Final Reporting 



After all of the analyses on a sample or group of samples is 
completed and reviewed for accuracy, a final analytical result 
report is generated by the Data Coordinator. The data from the 
Labworks database is exported into a Visual FoxPro database which 
contains all of the report forms used to produce a final result 
report. 

The final reports generated by the Data Coordinator are then 
submitted to the Laboratory Director or a designee for final 
review. The reviewer will sign off on the report and return it to 
the Data Coordinator. A copy of the report is made and filed 
according to client and/or site and the original copy is sent to 
the client or the client's agent. 

5.5 QA Records 

Records for QA documentation are retained according to the 
schedule shown in Table 5-1. 



UWSTCSTR££m 



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Records 
Analysis Report Hardcopy 
Audit Reports 
Certification Records 



Table 5-1 
QUALITY ASSURANCE RECORDS 
Location 
Client File 
QA File 
QA File 



Correspondence 

Project-related 

Non-project-related 

Instrument /Equipment 
Calibration and Maintenance 

Records 

Methods Manual, Revisions, 
Transmittal Records 

Quality Assurance Manual, 
Revisions, Transmittal 
Records 

Non-conformance /Corrective 

Action Reports 

Procurement Documents 



Project File 
QA File 

QA File 
QA File 

QA File 

QA File 
Procurement Log 



Quality Control Acceptance 
Criteria, Control Charts, and 
Current Data QA File 



Quality Control Reports 



QA File 



Raw Data Notebooks, Discs, 

Printouts, Recorder Tracings Laboratory Files 



QA Project Plans 

Standard Curves 
Training Records 



Project File 

Laboratory Files 
QA Files 



Retention 

3 years 
7 years 

4 years 



Project 
Specific 
1 year 



5 years 
7 years 

7 years 

5 years 
1 year 

5 years 
1 year 

5 years 

Project 
Specific 

5 years 

5 years 






c 



- 



Figure 5-1 



DATA VALIDATION CHECKLIST 



Date : 

Sample Group Mumber(s) 

Sample Number(s): 

fletliod: 

QA/QC Datch /: 



Checked Dy: 



Analyst : 



Ext Tech: 



7 . 



Q . 
10 



1 2 

in 



Analytical Work Form 
Waste Dilution Log 
Continuing Calibration 
Surrogate Recovery 
Internal Standard Bum. 
Result?* Report 



R EPORT FORMS 

Soil/Water Extraction Log 

Analysis Log (Injection) 

Reference Sample Recovery 

MS/MSD Recovery 

CC/MS Tune Report 

Batch complete? 



Q£J2AXALJifi£JJ5H 

Sample holding time summary: 

Date sampled: Date received: 

Date extracted: Date analyzed:_ 

Extracted w/ i hold" I ng Time Analyzed w/1 hold time 

Method blank summary: 
MR- extracted v/ batch? 
Analysis log complete? 



Extraction Log complete? 
Continuing calibration check 

C.C.C ran Cor a 

Percent difCerence of CCC 



MB analysis acceptable? 
Tropor sequence followed? 
matrix level 



sample sequence 
acceptable 



unacceptable 



% recovery acceptable 



\ recovery acceptable 



acceptable MSD 



ReCerence sample recovery: 
recoveries not acceptable 
Surrogate recovery summary: 

recoveries not in range 

Spike recovery summary: acceptable M 

RPD oT MS/MSD acceptable ~T~ 

Unacceptable results comments 

Duplicate analysis summary: RFD of duplicates acceptable 

Internal standard area summary: 

Internal stds acceptable Sample Int. stds acceptable 

unacceptable results comments 



11. CC/MS tune results acceptable 



samples analyzed w/1 12 hour tune period 
Date oE last initial calibration 



Metals Analysis; Inter Terence check acceptable 



DATA VALIDATION SUMMARY 



ULWSTESTO&in 



t 



». 






Figure 5-2 
ANALYTICAL VALIDATION CHECKLIST 

Sample ID Number (s) Analyzed: 



Date Reviewed 
Reviewed By 
Analytical Method 
Analyst 
Extracted By 
Date Extracted 
Date Analyzed 
W/l Holding Time ? 



QC CRITERIA 
N/A 



Analyzed 
Y/N 



Acceptable 
Y/N' 



Comments 



1 ) Initial Calibration 

2) Initial Calibration verif. 
2) ICP Interference Check 

4) Reference Smlpe (LCS) 

5) QC Check Sample 

6) Preparation blank 

7) Calibration Blanks 

8) Continuing Calibration 

9) Duplicate Smple 

1 0) Matrix spike 
1 11 Matrix Spike Duplicate 
" 12i RPD MS/MSD 



Validation Summary: 
Acceptable : YES / NO / Comments X 



Comments X 



* Corrective Action: 



ind<rasn>£flm 



Rpvipwrr Siqnafure & Dntf?: 



( 



Section : 6 
V Issue Date : 1/24/96 

Page No. : 1 

CORRECTIVE ACTIONS, PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE, AND INSTRUMENT 

MAINTENANCE LOGS 



6.1 Identification and Documentation of Problems 

There are many areas throughout an analysis where corrective 
actions may be required. The decision to undertake corrective 
actions and ensuing actions must be documented so that 
traceability can be maintained. Corrective actions can be 
initiated by both the analyst and the QA/QC Officer. However, the 
QA/QC Officer is more likely to initiate corrective actions since 
he/she is the most exposed to malfunctions of the laboratory as 
they reflect upon the data produced. Any actions taken that 
affect the quality of the data must be documented and become part 
of the laboratory's permanent record. 

During the course of data review, the QA/QC Officer may make 
an observation that will prompt a decision to pursue corrective 
actions. The QA/QC Officer is responsible for informing the 
analyst that a problem appears to exist. The types of problems 
that are observed usually fall into three categories; procedural 
problems, sample matrix effects, and equipment or instrument 
problems. All three categories may prompt the QA/QC Officer to 
request that a sample or group of samples be re-extracted and/or 
re-analyzed. When this situation arises, the QA/QC Officer will 
initiate the corrective action by filling out a Sample Re- 
extraction/Re-Analysis Form (Figure 6-1) . The following 
information will be entered on the form; 

1. The date of the request. 

2. The Request Number. This number is assigned by the 
QA/QC Officer for purposes of tracking the distribution 
of request forms. When a request form is distributed, 
the QA/QC Officer records the request number in the 
tracking logbook. When the request form is returned the 
logbook is checked to indicate the return. 

3. The ID number (s) of the sample(s) to be re-analyzed. 

4. The analysis method to be performed and whether the 
sample(s) requires re-extraction and re-analysis or 
just re-analysis. 

5. The reason for the request. This entry will detail the 
problem encountered and the corrective actions required 
prior to re-extraction or re-analysis of the sample(s). 

6. The person to whom the request was submitted and the 
corresponding laboratory department. 

7. The date by which the corrective actions and sample re- 
analysis must be completed. 



UWSTESTTttdm 



( 



Section : 6 

Issue Date : 1/24/96 

Page No. : 2 

Upon completion of the re-analysis, the analyst will return 
the Request Form to the QA/QC Officer along with all of the data 
pertinent to the required corrective action and subsequent sample 
re-analysis. The QA/QC Officer will review the data and record 
any comments regarding the review. When the review is completed, 
he/she will sign and date the form. A copy of the form will be 
attached to the data package and the original will be placed in a 
3 ring binder as part of the QA/QC Officer's files. 

Other corrective actions may be required that do not involve 
sample re-analysis. In these cases, the QA/QC Officer will notify 
the analyst or technician of a problem through a QC Memo. The 
memo will list the date of distribution, the name of the QA/QC 
Officer writing the memo, the person (s) to whom the memo was 
given, the memo reference number used by the QA/QC Officer for 
tracking memos that have been distributed, a detailed description 
of the problem and the corrective action(s) to be taken, and the 
date by which the actions need to be completed. If the problem 
identified by the QA/QC Officer is sufficient enough to 
significantly impact the quality of the data, the QA/QC Officer 
may stop the analysis of any additional samples until the problem 
is resolved. The analyst or technician must then record onto the 
memo a description of the corrective action(s) taken and the date 
it was performed. The analyst will then return the memo to the 
QA/QC Officer for review. If the QA/QC Officer is satisfied that 
the corrective action has mitigated the problem, analysis of 
samples can be resumed. If not, he/she may issue another memo 
detailing the additional actions that need to be taken in order 
to resolve the problem. 

If, upon repeated attempts, the QA/QC Officer feels that the 
actions taken have not satisfactorily corrected the problem, 
he/she will inform the appropriate corporate officer of the 
problem. The problem will then be resolved through a joint effort 
between the laboratory management, the QA/QC Officer, and the 
corporate officers. 

In some situations, the need to correct an operation is 
apparent to the analyst and does not originate from the data 
validation process. For example, instrumental failures are 
determined by the analyst and corrective action is taken by 
repairing the instrument, either through a service call or 
through laboratory personnel. In this case, the corrective action 
must be recorded in the Instrument Maintenance Log (See Section 
6.4) of the effected instrument. 



ULWSTISTBEdm 



Section : 6 

Issue Date : 1/24/96 

Page No. : 3 

6.2 Problems and Actions (See Figure 6-2) 

6.2.1 Continuing Calibration Outside Acceptance Limits 

When the continuing calibration is outside the acceptable 
range, the problem should be identified by the analyst and 
corrected before any sample analysis is undertaken. On some 
occasions, the non-acceptability of the continuing calibration 
will not be determined by the analyst. In these cases, the QA/QC 
Officer will notify the appropriate analyst that a new initial 
calibration curve must be prepared or the continuing calibration 
standard should be checked. 

The data on all the samples that have been analyzed 
following the last time that the calibration was within 
specification, will be rejected by the analyst or the QA/QC 
Officer, depending on the stage of the process at which the non- 
acceptability of the calibration curve was determined. The 
samples will be reanalyzed after a new initial calibration has 
been performed. 

6.2.2 Calibration Standards Exceeding the Permitted 
Holding Time 

If calibration standards have been continuously used beyond 
their permitted shelf-life, the QA/QC Officer will inform the 
responsible analyst. The analyst will then be responsible for 
preparing fresh calibration standards and the instrument will be 
checked against the new standards. If the previous runs performed 
with the expired standards meet the acceptance criteria based on 
the new standards, the data generated will be considered valid, 
in spite of the use of expired standards. 

If the calibration performed with the expired standards do 
not meet the acceptance criteria when measured against the new 
standards, the samples that have been analyzed against the 
expired standards will be reanalyzed. 

6.2.3 Laboratory Method Blanks Exceed Method Detection 
but Are Below Quantitation Limit 

When laboratory blanks exhibit the presence of target 
analytes at a level exceeding the method detection limit, but 
still below the quantitation limit, the QA/QC Officer will notify 
the responsible analyst. The analyst will then check the reagent 
blanks that have been retained at the time the reagents were 
first used, in order to determine if contamination or 
interferences are due to impurities in the reagents. If this is 
the case, the reagent batch will be discarded and new reagents 



tiusT!sn*£iam 



Section : 6 

Issue Date : 1/24/96 

Page No. : 4 

from fresh containers will be used. If the reagents appear to be 
sufficiently pure, the cleanliness in the laboratory will be 
inspected and reinforced to establish if the source of the 
problem may have been contamination of the apparatus. 

The data associated with the blank will be accepted. If the 
analytes detected in the method blank are detected in the 
samples, the results reported for that analyte will be flagged. 

6.2.4. Laboratory Method Blank Exceeds Quantitation 
Limits 

When the laboratory method blank exceeds the quantitation 
limit, the QA/QC Officer will immediately notify the responsible 
analyst. Once again, the analyst will check the reagents and 
apparatus for potential contamination. If reagents are 
contaminated, the existing batch will be rejected and a fresh 
batch from a new container will be prepared. 

If the problem arose from the apparatus, whether glassware 
or instrumental, the problem will be corrected by the analyst 
and/or extraction technician. The corrective action will be 
documented before any further analyses can be undertaken. The 
analyst will then notify the QA/QC Officer of the corrective 
action. 

The data associated with the failed method blank will be 
rejected. The samples will be re-extracted and re-analyzed to 
produce acceptable data. However, in instances where the analyte 
found in the blank is not detected or detected below the 
quantitation limit in the samples associated with the blank, the 
data may be accepted. 

6.2.5 Reference Sample (Spiked Blank) Exhibits 
Recoveries Outside the Acceptance Limits 

When the reference sample recoveries do not meet the 
acceptance criteria, the samples in the batch associated with the 
failed reference sample will be reanalyzed and the original data 
will be rejected. 

Before repeating the re-preparations of samples, the 
calibration of the instrument shall be checked by analyzing a 
continuing calibration check standard. If the instrument is 
within calibration, the samples will be reprepared and 
reanalyzed. 

If the instrument calibration has drifted, recalibration 
will be performed and the samples will be re-analyzed. 






6.2.6 



Section : 6 

Issue Date : 1/24/96 

Page No. : 5 

Surrogates and Sample Spikes Exhibit Recoveries 
Outside the Acceptance Limits 



When recoveries of surrogates and/or spiked analytes are 
outside the acceptance limits, but the laboratory spiked blank is 
within acceptance limits, the apparent poor or enhanced recovery 
may be due to matrix effect. The sample exhibiting the 
unacceptable recovery may be re-prepared and re-analyzed. If the 
same phenomenon is observed, it will be assumed that the failure 
to meet recovery criteria was in fact a matrix effect. This 
information will be included in the report to the client and the 
original data will then be accepted. 

If, upon re-analysis, the recovery of the surrogates or 
spiked analytes fall within acceptable limits, the results of the 
re-analysis will be reported and the original analysis results 
rejected due to a procedural problem. 

In some instances it may be obvious from the data produced 
or from the observations made during the preparation process that 
the sample matrix is causing the unacceptable recoveries. In 
these cases, the sample will not be re-prepared or re-analyzed 
and the observations made will be included in the report to the 
client. 

If the surrogate recovery in a method blank or reference 
sample is outside the acceptance limits (but the analytes in the 
reference sample are within acceptance limits) , the analyst may 
need to analyze the surrogate standard solution to check for 
degradation or contamination. If the standard solution is 
determined to be the problem the analyst will immediately prepare 
a new standard. It is also possible that the calibration of the 
surrogate compound has drifted, in which case the analyst should 
re-calibrate the system. 



6.2.7 



Control Chart Exhibits a Regular Trend 



The control chart is used to assess the acceptability of 
recovery data on the basis of historical data. Since the 
individual points that make up a control chart for any analyte 
vary randomly about a mean value, a regular trend can warn the 
analyst that some consistent problem or deviation in- the method 
may be occurring. 

When five successive points on the control chart form a 
steady pattern, either regularly increasing or regularly 
decreasing, they may imply that some change is occurring in the 
analytical scheme. Even if the points are within the control 






Section : 6 

Issue Date : 1/24/96 

Page No. : 6 

limits, a warning will be issued by the QA/QC Officer to the 
responsible analyst to investigate the cause of the pattern. If 
in fact a change has occurred in the method, and if the change 
indicates an improvement in recoveries (an improvement is defined 
as approaching complete recovery, not necessarily an upward 
trend) , then a new control chart will be established and 
subsequent data will be compared to the new control chart limits. 
If a change has occurred that worsens the recovery, it will be 
the responsibility of the analyst to assure that a return to the 
previous technique is made. 

6.3 Preventive Maintenance 

Preventive maintenance is necessary in order to keep the 
system operating properly. Not all preventive maintenance 
measures need to be documented, except those that are considered 
a repair or a replacement. These types of preventive maintenance 
will be documented in the Instrument Maintenance Log of the 
affected instrument. Each instrument will have a preventive 
maintenance schedule which can be found in the analytical SOP. 
The schedule may also include preventive maintenance performed by 
the manufacturer as per the terms of the service contract, which 
is purchased for laboratory instruments. 

Routinely scheduled preventive maintenance consists of the 
following: 

1. General 

a. Maintenance logs are maintained for each major 
instrument (See Section 6.4). 

b. Room temperature and humidity are maintained 
according to the manufacturers' specifications. 

2. Gas Chromatograph and Gas Chromatograph/ Mass 
Spectrometer (GC and GC/MS) 

Daily Procedures 

a. Purge traps are baked out. Changes of the traps 
are logged. 

b. Columns are baked out. 

c. Volume of gas cylinders is checked. 

As Required Procedures 

a. Teflon ferrules are replaced. 

b. Injection port liners are cleaned or replaced. 

c. GC septa are changed after 50 injections. 

d. Detectors are baked out. 



uwsnsn*£iam 

■ OkOAJ 






: 



Section : 6 

Issue Date : 1/24/96 

Page No. : 7 

Quarterly Procedures 

a. Instrument electronics are visually inspected 
and cleaned. 

b. Detectors are cleaned on a schedule recommended 
by the manufacturer or more frequently as needed. 

Annual Procedures 

a. Electron capture detectors are wipe tested. 

b. Preventive maintanence performed by 
manufacturer as per service contract terms 

Spare Parts 

a. Septa 

b. Purge and trap sparger 

c. Purge and trap traps 

d. Tubing and fittings 

e. Thermal conductivity leak detector 

f. Column ferrules 

g. U.V. lamp for PID detectors 

h. Nickel catalyst tubes for ELCD detectors 

i. Syringes for spiking 

j . Mass spectrometer source filaments 

k. Jet separator 

1. Pump oil 

m. Analytical columns 

n. Flow meter bubble solution 

o. Flow meters 

p. Spare guard columns 

q. Injection port liners 

3. Infrared Spectrometer 

Daily Procedures or After Each Use 

a. Clean IR cells, store in desiccator 

Weekly Procedures 

a. Run spectrum of polystyrene. 

Spare Parts - IR cells, chart paper & pens 

4. Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectrometer (ICP) 

Daily Procedures 

a. Check gases before operation 

b. Monitor detector response and instrument 
performance through calibration and verification. 






uwsnisn*£dm 



< 



) 



Section : 6 

Issue Date : 1/24/96 

Page No. : 8 

Procedures as Needed 

a. Clean nebulizer and spray chamber 

b. Replace peristaltic pump tubing 

c. Clean plasma torch assembly when discoloration 
is evident or after analyzing high dissolved 
solids. 

Spare Parts - Spare plasma torch, argon chamber and 
pump tubing 

5. AA/Graphite Furnace 
Daily Procedures 

a. Warm up AA lamp for 15 minutes prior to 
analysis 

b. check and align source lamp 

c. Check autosampler alignment and deposition 

Procedure as Needed 

a. Change graphite contact rings 

b. Change background correction lamp 

c. Clean furnace housing and injector tip 

d. Replace pyrollytic graphite furnace tubes as 
indicated by instrument performance 

Spare parts- Contact rings, furnace tube assemblies, 
lamps 

6.4 Instrument Maintenance Logs 

All instrument repair and maintenance which will effect the 
steady state of the analytical system must be documented in the 
Instrument Maintenance Log. A description of the problem and the 
corrective actions taken to remedy the problem will be recorded. 

If a service representative is called in to make the repair, 
a copy of the Field Service Report, if available, is filed into 
the Instrument Maintenance Log. The corrective actions 
explanation will reference the number of the Field Service 
Report. 

When a major repair is performed or when the column is 
replaced, the instrument detection limit should be determined to 
see if it has changed significantly. If it has, new method 
detection limits need to be established and documented. If the 
IDL has not changed, the MDL and QL need not be performed. 



ULwsnsrft£jm 



Figure 6-1 



Sample i;p-rx | i n<:l. i on/He-Aim I ys i s Request Form 



On lie 



Request Number 



Requested By 
Sample II) § 



Analysis Method Requested 

Rp-pxl.fricl; and re-analyze 
R e - a 1 1 a I y 7. e only 



Reason for Request 



Request Submit Led To : 
Department : 
Subm i t Resu 1 I s lly ( Date) 



Return this form a I onu with a copy of the re-ana lysis results to 
the person I isted at the top of this form. If re-ex tract i on was 
required, and if the sample extract is to be analyzed by a 
different person or department, submit this form alony with the 
extract to the appropriate analyst. The analyst must: then submit, 
this form along with the results of t 1ip» re -ana lysis. 



He-ana lysis Results Reviewed lly 



Commen ts 



bate 






Figure 6-2 



m 



IH'AN.\I.V/I INIHUIIIMI 
s (Mil is |ii V I mi \ 
cm >m i m 







I'Klltll IM 
S \Mfl K 
HI I ,MII> 






') 



Section No. : 7 
Issue Date: 1/24/96 
Page No. : 1 

BIOGRAPHIES OF KEY PERSONNEL 

Dr. Brian S. Schepart Laboratory Director 

Dr. Schepart received his B.A. in Biology from Clark 
University in 1977, and his Ph.D. in Experimental Pathology from 
the State University of New York at Buffalo in February of 1983, 
and his B.S. Pharmacy from the State University of New York at 
Buffalo in 1994. He was a Damon Runyon - Walter Winchell Fellow 
at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and an 
Instructor of Microbiology at Duke University. Since 1986, Dr. 
Schepart has been an Assistant Professor of Microbiology and 
Immunology at the Medical College of Pennsylvania (MCP) , where he 
presently retains an adjunct position. While at MCP, he directed 
and managed a team of seven researchers whose work was supported 
by extramural funds. To his credit, Dr. Schepart has authored 
over twenty peer-reviewed publications and has received numerous 
awards and grants, from both public and private agencies. He is 
the Chairman of ASTM F20.24, a subcommittee within Spill Response 
F20 since 1991. He joined Waste Stream Technology in 1989. 

Daniel W. Vollmer QA/QC Officer 

Mr. Vollmer graduated from the State University of New York 
at Buffalo with a B.A. in Biology. Since his graduation, he has 
gained extensive experience in analytical chemistry as a 
laboratory technician, a GC, GC/MS, and HPLC analyst, and a 
laboratory supervisor. Since 1989, in conjunction with Dr. 
Schepart, he has been responsible for setting up WST's analytical 
laboratory and establishing the current laboratory protocol. In 
doing so, he has obtained extensive experience in US EPA 
methodologies, including the requirements necessary for 
maintaining good Quality Assurance and Quality Control. 

Paul Morrow Assistant Laboratory Director 

Mr. Morrow has a B.A. in Biochemistry from Canisius College, 
as well as an M.B.A., where he received the Edna Galvin Zeeman 
Award. Mr. Morrow has more than 8 years experience in GC and 
GC/MS methodologies for the generation of data according to 
NYSDEC and USEPA CLP protocols. His experience as an Accounts 
Manager and Sample Controller reinforce his knowledge of the 
environmental testing laboratory. 

Ralph Williams Manager of the PCB and Pesticides Laboratory 

Mr. Williams received his A.A.S. in Chemical Technology from 
Erie Community College, and his B.A. in Chemistry from State 
University College at Buffalo. He joined Waste Stream in 1993 






my 



Section No. : 7 
Issue Date: 1/24/96 
Page No. : 2 

after more than 10 years experience as a GC operator and analyst 
of PCBs, pesticides, and herbicides. 

Sidney Tyrrell Organics Analyst 

Mr. Tyrrell received his A.S. in Chemistry from Erie 
Community College in 1983. He joined WST after 10 years of 
experience as a GC and GC/MS Analyst. Since joining WST in 
February, 1994, he has established analyses for drinking water 
and continues to provide expertise in GC and GC/MS volatiles and 
semi-volatiles. 

Anthony Portfilio Senior Metals Analyst 

Mr. Portfilio received his B.S. in Recombinant DNA 
Technology at the State University of New York at Fredonia. He 
joined WST in 1993 with 4 years experience in operation and 
interpretation of metals analysis by Inductively Coupled Plasma 
Spectrophotometry, Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry and 
Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry. In 
addition, he operates a Hydride Continuous Flow Analyzer for low 
level analysis of metals. 

Allan Morris Analyst and Health & Safety Officer 

Mr. Morris received his B.S. in Biochemical Pharmacology 
from the State University of New York at Buffalo. He joined WST 
in 1994 after working for Buffalo State College Division of 
Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. He serves as a metals 
analyst using ICP, FLAA, and GFAA, as well as our Health & Safety 
Officer. 

Dawn Cermak Chemistry Lab Supervisor 

Ms. Cermak received her B.S. in Environmental Studies from 
the State University of New York at Buffalo. She joined WST in 
1991, and has been responsible for supervising sample receipt, 
logging and disposal. She supervises the extraction laboratory 
in procedures according to USEPA, ASTM, and Standard 
methodologies for organic and inorganic analyses. She also 
supervises the Wet Chemistry laboratory personnel. 

Gina Debergalis Data Coordinator 

Ms. Debergalis received her B.S. in Environmental Studies 
from the State University of New York at Buffalo in 1994. She 
then joined Waste Stream as a data coordinator, responsible for 
generating final reports, telefaxing and mailing of reports, and 
archiving of reports and analytic data. 






APPENDICES 



ULWSTISTBEdm 



Section No. : App-1 
Issue Date: 1/24/96 
Page No. : 1 



SAFETY 



Safety requires an open attitude and a knowledgeable 
awareness of potential hazards. Safety is a collective effort and 
requires the full cooperation of management, supervisors, and 
employees. This cooperation means that everyone should adhere to 
the established procedures of the company which are incorporated 
into the laboratory's "Chemical Hygiene Plan," "Hazard 
Communication Standard," and the "Waste Stream Technology Safety 
Manual. " 

Briefly, these manuals include guidelines, procedures, and 
suggestions for the following areas: 

1. Personal protective equipment 

2. Training 

3. Emergency action 

4. Chemical hazards 

5. Chemical storage 

6. Fume hood monitoring program 

7. Accident reporting 

8. Established work rules 

Personal Protective Equipment 

Eye protection is required at all times in the laboratory 
and where chemicals are stored and handled. Appropriate clothing 
must be worn, including a protective lab coat. Open-toed shoes or 
sandals are not permitted. Gloves of the proper material should 
be selected to provide sufficient protection to minimize the 
chance of skin contact. Respirators should be worn as needed. 

Training 

Adequate training will be provided by management and the 
Health and Safety Department. Employees are expected to adhere to 
all safety rules as well as to seek advice and guidance whenever 
they have doubts about safety procedures or potential hazards. 
The training incorporates chemical hazards, evacuation, use of 
fire extinguishers, and use of the eye wash and other protective 
equipment. The employees are also instructed on signs and 
symptoms of over-exposure, OSHA permissible exposure limits 
(PEL'S), location of Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) , and how 
to read MSDS and reagent labeling. Employees are also instructed 
in proper respirator selection and use including fit testing. 



iDasTEsn&am 



Section No. : App-1 
Issue Date: 1/24/96 
Page No. : 2 



Emergency Action 



Employees are instructed on emergency action procedures 
which include spills/release, evacuation, and reporting. Routine 
drills are conducted throughout the entire company. An emergency 
action plan is provided and used in the training of all 
laboratory personnel. Escape route are mapped out throughout the 
building. Fire alarms, fore extinguishers, and a sprinkler system 
are in place and inspected every other month. 

Chemical Hazards 

All employees who may be exposed to chemicals which may 
present a hazard, are fully informed of potential hazards and 
proper handling that is required to avoid exposure. This is 
accomplished through reagent labeling and MSDS's. Each employee 
is instructed on how to decipher a MSDS Sheet, providing the 
employee with special instructions on personal protective 
equipment, storage requirements, and associated health hazards. 
Special precautions and labeling are required for toxic, 
carcinogenic, or mutagenic compounds. 

Storage 

Chemicals are arranged so only compatible chemical families 
are stored together. Flammable liquids are stored in minimum 
quantities within the laboratory, while additional storage is 
provided on the first level of the facility in a non-flammable, 
fire resistant cabinet. 

Medical Surveillance 

Employees have the option to receive medical attention 
whenever any of the following occur: 

1. Employees develop signs or symptoms associated 
with hazardous chemicals. 

2. Exposure levels routinely exceed the action 
levels . 

3. There is a spill, leak, or release into the 
working environment. 

Reporting of Injury or Illness 

Employees must report all work-related injuries or 
illnesses. This will ensure that the appropriate medical 
treatment or follow-up is obtained. This will also alert 
management to unsafe work practices or conditions so corrective 
actions can be taken. 



UWSTEST*£dm 

r ■.■.pigs: 



Section No. : App-1 
Issue Date: 1/24/96 
Page No. : 3 



Established Work Rules 



The following is a list of established safety rules which 
everyone must abide by: 

1. Consumption, preparation, and storage of food and 
beverages are prohibited in the laboratory. 

2. Laboratory glassware will not be used to contain 
food or beverages. 

3 . Smoking is prohibited in the laboratory and in the 
facility. 

4. Safety glasses or goggles are required in the 
laboratory. 

5. All visitors to the laboratory must follow the 
safety regulations. 

6. Chemicals are not allowed in offices. 

7. Horseplay and other acts of mischief are 
prohibited. 

3. Unauthorized experiments are prohibited. 






Section No.: App-2 
Issue Date: 1/24/96 
Page No. : 1 

WASTE DISPOSAL 

Procedures for the disposal of waste and virgin chemicals 
are outlined in the "Waste Management Plan." Workers should 
follow this program with care to avoid any safety hazards or 
damage to the environment. 

Included in this program are five ways to reduce the amount 
of waste generated. This is the first step in any waste 
management program. These include: 

1. Planning experiments 

2. Reducing the scale of experiments 

3. Controlling reagents which can deteriorate 

4. Maintaining reagent labeling 

5. Preventing orphan (unknown) chemical mixture 

In general, WST has incorporated four routes of disposal 
into the "Waste Management Plan." They are: 

1. If possible, samples received for laboratory 
analyses are returned to the client or site upon 
completion. 

2. Solvents are recovered/recycled through 
distillation. 

3. Certain highly diluted, water soluble chemicals 
may be disposed of in small quantities in the 
sanitary sewer system. 

4. The remaining waste will be separated and drummed 
for incineration or landfill. 

Waste is segregated based upon its chemical properties. 
Liquids are packaged separately from solids. Reactive waste is 
isolated from non-reactive waste. In general, the Waste 
Coordinator will assist in the segregation of waste. 

All waste is stored in the posted waste storage area until 
disposal. Lab packs and disposal drums require DOT approved 
containers. All inside lab pack containers must be compatible for 
that waste. The maximum internal lab pack size is one gallon for 
metal, plastic, and glass containers. The chemical name and 
type/size of container should be recorded onto the side of the 
drum. 

Laboratory wastes will be stored in 5 gallon poly-buckets in 
the laboratory until full when they will be dumped into 
appropriate drums. Samples containing PCB material will be held 
separately. Samples that are sent back to the client are recorded 



UWSTESTRfdm 



• 



• 



Section No.: App-2 
Issue Date: 1/24/96 
Page No. : 2 

on a type written sheet and relinquished to a transporter. These 
completed forms are maintained by Sample Control and are filed in 
a three ring bound notebook. The forms are maintained for seven 
years after disposal. 

The small containers that are packed in drums are separated 
based upon DOT hazard classes. In decreasing hazard order, they 
are: 

- Radioactive 

- Poison A 

- Flammable gas 

- Non-flammable gas 

- Flammable liquid 

- Oxidizer 

- Flammable solid 

- Corrosive (liquid) 

- Poison B 

- Corrosive (solid) 

- Irritating agent 

- ORM-B 

- ORM-A 

- Combustible liquid 

- ORM-E 

The Waste Coordinator prepares the waste manifest, shipping 
inventory and drum labels. The drums are labeled according to DOT 
requirements. Records of the disposal are maintained and filed 
with the Waste Coordinator for seven years. 



ILWSTESTBEdm 

[— 7 ; ..O^'J 



• 



Section No. : App-3 
Issue Date: 1/24/96 
Page No. : 1 



SECURITY 



There are three main areas to be considered when dealing 
with security. They are: 

1. Laboratories 

2. Offices 

3. Sample storage areas 

Security for the facility is provided by restricted 
admission through a main entrance during standard working hours. 
Key personnel are allowed access to the facility during non- 
standard hours using a computer-linked individualized numeric 
access code. 

The integrity of the facility is monitored at key points 
using motion and audio sensors in addition to strategically 
placed door switches. Twenty-four hour monitoring of the system 
includes : 

1. Computer link-up 

2. Audio monitoring 

3. 911 and hold-up protection 

4 . Perimeter security 

5. Secure check-in/check-out 

6. Monthly reports on check-in/check-out 

In addition to the electronic security system, the samples 
are stored in a secured area. All cabinets and refrigerators are 
kept locked at all times. The Sample Custodian is in charge of 
access and all samples removed or returned must be logged out. 






• 



Section No. : App-4 
Issue Date: 1/24/96 
Page No. : 1 



EXECUTIVE QUALITY ASSURANCE SUMMARY 

A general QA report which summarizes problems encountered 
throughout the laboratory effort, including sample custody, 
analyses, and reporting, is provided every other month to 
laboratory management by the QA/QC Officer. This report 
identifies areas of concern and possible resolutions in an effort 
to ensure data quality. 

Upon completion of a project sampling effort, analytical and 
QC data may be included in a comprehensive report that summarizes 
the work and provides a data evaluation. A discussion of the 
validity of the results in the context of QA/QC procedures may be 
made, as well as a summation of all QA/QC activity. 

Serious analytical problems will be reported to the client. 
Time and type of corrective action, if needed, will depend on the 
severity of the problem and relative overall project importance. 
Corrective actions may include altering procedures in the field, 
conducting an audit, or modifying laboratory protocol. All 
corrective action will be implemented after notification and 
approval of the client. 



ULwsnsnffam 



i 



Section No. : App-5 
Issue Date: 1/24/96 



Laboratory Certifications 



1. New York State Department of Health 

2. New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and 
Energy 

3. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 

4. Rhode Island Department of Health 






• 



INI.W WHCk SIAIi; III I'AIC I IMIIN I III-" III Al. I II 

BARBARA A. DEBUONO, 11.0., H.P.H. Commissioner 

Expires 12:01 AH April 1, 1996 
ISSUED April 1, 1995 
REVISED July 23, 1995 

knitjuim ckktii m:\ti: or approval i ok laiiokatoicy skicvick 

Issunl in in i in i/iiin r nilli unit pursuant In w< Imu "itl'J I'uhlic ffrullh l.mr <>/ IV rw Ymk Stuff 




Lab ID No. : 11179 



Director: DR. BRIAN SCHEPART 
Lab Name: WASTE STREAM TECHNOLOGY 
Address : 302 GROTE STREET 
BUFFALO NY 14207 



is hereby APPROVED as an Environmental Laboratory for the category 

ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSES /SOLID AND HAZARDOUS WASTE 

All approved subcategories and/or analytes are listed below: 



Saracteristic Testing : 
£octo$i7itT 

^Rtirity 

tap 

S.P. roiicitf 
'urgeaole kroutict (ALL) 



totals II ■. 

Arseoic, Total 

Kercury, Total 

Antiiooy, Total 

Seleniui, Total 
Polychlorinated Bipoenyis [ALL) 
Purgeaoie flalocarboos (ALL) 



Kisceliaoeous s 

Cfitiiie, Totil 

Lead in Paint 
Haloethers (ALL) 
IlitroaroHtlcs Isophorone (ALL) 
Pfttnalate Ssters (til) 



Chlorophenoiy kid Pesticides (til} 
Color, flydrocarboo hsticiies (til) 
Chlorinated Hydrocarbons (til) 
Ketais r (til) 

Poiynuclear A;oi. Hydrocarbon (ALL) 
Priority Pollutant Phenols (ALL) 



Serial No.: 030789 



W.nlsworlli Center 



I'rupiTl) of llir New York SliiU- l)<-|>;ir I im-nl >.l 1 1 ■■ si 1 1 It . Valid unlv al llic iuMrrss •tlmwu. 
Mii<i lir miispiriiu nsl v imiMciI. Valid ri-rl il irah* litis a ml s >* r i <i I iitimlirr. 

DOM-3317 (3/95) 



UWSTESTRE^m 

|"r~~i"c k " o l o c ] 



M.W M»|(k S| All. |>KI*AIM IMKfN I <>l III Al.TI 



• 



BARBARA A. DEBUONO, M.D., H.P.H. Commissioner 

Expires 12:01 AM April I, 1996 
ISSUED April 1, 1995 
REVISED July 28, 1995 

KNTKICIIM <i;in II ICATK <)l AIM'IM)VAL R)l{ LAIIO»ATOHY SEKVICE 




Uu,,;l 



in in i hi itniii r with iiml fmiumnl In M-iluiit .'~)l>2 I'lililir llrtilfh l.mr <>/ /Vrn< ) m h Slnlr 



Lab ID No. : 11179 



Director-. DR. BRIAN SCIIEPART 
Lab Name: WASTE STREAM TECHNOLOGY 
Address : 302 GROTE STREET 
BUFFALO NY 14207 



is hereby APPROVED as an Environmental Laboratory for the category 
ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSES NON POTABLE HATER 



All approved subcategories and/or analytes are listed below: 



metal 

hliaitj 
moriit 

Sulfate fas S04J 

Hardness, Total 
rastevater Hetals II fALC) 
Polycblorioated flipbenyls I Ml} 
?argeable ftaloatbons (ALL) 



rastevater rtiscellaneous •. 

Cyanide, Total 

Oil S Crease Total Recojeiable 

Hydrogen Ion (pfl| 
Ciloropheuory Acid Pesticides (ALL) 
Deiand {Ml} 

litroaroiatics and Isopnorone (ALL) 
Pbthalate Ssters (Ml) 
Residue (Ml} 



rastevater Kitals III • 

Cobalt, Total 

Tballim, Total 
Kastevater Bacteriology (Ml} 
Color, flydrocarboo Pesticides fALl] 
flaloetbers (Ml} 
Hitroaoaiines (ALL) 
Priority Pollutant Phenols [ALL J 
TCLP Additional Coipounds (Ml} 



Mrient : 

Aiioaia fas X| 

Pbospbonis, Total 
Benzidines (Ml} 
Chlorinated flydrocarboas (ALL) 
ifastevater tfetals 1 (ALL) 
Polynuclear Aroiatics (ALL) 
Purgeable Aroiatics fALLJ 



Serial No, 030788 



Wads wo rlh Ccnltrr 



I'liipi-r t ) nl ilir iN c « York Sl:tlr> l)i*|i»rl infill ■•! Ilr-illli, V;ili.l inily ;i l I tie itililrrss sluiivn. 
Musi he i'ii ii.tuiciiiiiisl \ imslril. Valid rrrl il irali" li:is ;i ml srrisil ii (i ill In* r. 

DOII-J1I7 (3/95) 



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STATE OF NEW JERSEY 
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION 
OFFICE OF QUALITY ASSURANCE 
ANNUAL CERTIFIED PARAMETER LIST FOR 1995-1996 



JTE STREAM TECHNOLOGY f INC. (73977) IS CERTIFIED TO PERFORM THE ANALYSES 

BELOW UNTIL JUNE 30 1996. 



LINKING WATER LABORATORY CERTIFICATION 

LIMITED CHEMISTRY 

03<» CYANIDE, SPECTROPHOTO 

METALS 

025 ANTIMONY", GRAPH FURNACE 

029 NICKEL, GRAPH FURNACE 

030 NICKEL, ICAP 

03L THALLIUM, GRAPH FURNACE 

036 BERYLLIUM, ICAP 

912 HG, MANUAL COLD VAPOR 

913 HG, AUTO COLD VAPOR TECH 
9LV AS, GRAPHITE FURNACE 
916 CD, GRAPHITE FURNACE 
918 PB, GRAPHITE FURNACE 

920 SE, GRAPHITE FURNACE 

921 AG, GRAPHITE FURNACE 

961 BARIUM, ICAP 

962 CADMIUM, ICAP 



PAGE 



LAB 73977 
10/25/95 



i mSTESTRfd m 



UNKING WATER LADORATORY C ER T I F IC ATI ON 
METALS 

963 CHROMIUM, ICAP 

965 SILVER, ICAP 

966 COPPER, ICAP 

ORGANICS 

52<f-2 VOC (PT/GC-MS) 

iATER POLLUTION LABORATORY CERTIFICATION 
LIMITED CHEMISTRY 

00<«00 HYDROGEN ION-PH 

00500 TOT SOLIDS 

00530 SUSP SOLIDS 

00556 OIL AND GREASE 

00720 CYANIDE, TOTAL 

70300 TOT DISS SOLIDS 

METALS 

00915 CALCIUM (ICAP) 

00925 MAGNESIUM (ICAP) 

00929 SODIUM (ICAP) 

00935 POTASSIUM (ICAP) 

01002 ARSENIC (AA/GF) 
0L005 BARIUM (ICAP) 



PAGE 



LAD 73977 
10/25/95 



IJUd STESTREd m 



*TER POLLUTION LABORATORY CERTIFICATION 
METALS 

01010 BERYLLIUM (ICAP) 

01025 CADMIUM (ICAP) 

01027 CADMIUM (AA/GF) 

01030 CHROMIUM (ICAP) 

01035 COBALT (ICAP) 

01037 COBALT (AA/GF) 

010^0 COPPER (ICAP) 

010<»9 LEAD (ICAP) 

01051 LEAD (AA/GF) 

01055 MANGANESE (ICAP) 

01057 THALLIUM (ICAP) 

0L059 THALLIUM (AA/GF) 

^fc 01060 MOLYBDENUM ([CAP) 

01062 MOLYBDENUM (AA/GF) 

01065 NICKEL (ICAP) 

0L067 NICKEL (AA/GF) 

01075 SILVER (ICAP) 

01085 VANADIUM (ICAP) 

01090 ZINC (ICAP) 

01092 ZINC (AA/GF) 

01097 ANTIMONY (AA/GF) 

01105 ALUMINUM (ICAP) 



PAGE 



LAB 73977 
10/25/95 



U-WSTESTRfdm 



ATER POLLUTION LABORATORY CERTIFICATION 
METALS 

011^7 SELENIUM (AA/GF) 
71900 MERCURY (COLD VAPOR) 

ORGANICS 

602 PURGEADLE AROMATICS (GO 

608 PESTICIDES £ PCBS (GC) 

62*» PURGEABLES (GC/MS) 

625 fl/N, ACIDS L PEST (GC/MS) 



HIS LIST MUST BE CONSPICUOUSLY DISPLAYED WITH THE PERMANENT 
ERTIFICATE AT THE LABORATORY 



PAGE 



LAB 73977 
10/25/95 



lUd STESTftfd m 




At TENIIf )fl OF 



DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY 

us army conns or engineers — mrd 
i 1 1 nw manoaiory cen i en or exper t ise 

I25G5 WEST CENTER ROAD 
OMAHA. NEBRASKA 68M4-3069 



August 23, 1995 




Hazardous, Toxic and Radioactive Waste 
Center of Expertise 



Waste Stream Technology, 
302 Grote Street 
Buffalo, NY 14207 



Gentlemen 



Inc. 




This correspondence addresses the ongoing validation status 
of Waste Stream Technology, Inc. of Buffalo, New York by the U.S 
Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Hazardous, Toxic and Radioactive 
Waste Center of Expertise (HTRW CX) for HTRW analysis. 

With the inclusion of the recent successful analysis for 
Herbicides (by EPA 8150A), your laboratory has successfully 
analyzed performance evaluation samples as listed below: 



METHOD 


8240A 


8020 


82 70A 


8270A 


8081 


8081 


8081 



PARAMETERS 



MATRIX 



Volatile Organics 
Aromatic Volatile Organics 

Semivolatile Organics 
Semivolatile Organics 

Organochlorine Pesticides 
Polychlorinated Biphenyls 
Polychlorina ted Biphenyls 



Water 

Water 

Water 
Soil 

Water 
Water 
Soil 



8150A 



Herbic Ides 



Water 



SW-846 
SW-846 



TAL Metals'" 
TAL Metals' 11 



Water 
Soil 



413.1 
418. 1 
9071/418. 1 



Oil & Grease 

TRPH 

TRPH 



Water 
Water 
Soil 



9010A/9012 Cyanide 

Mod 8015 Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 



Water 
Water 



© 



Hecycleil (*r»f>*« 



WdSTESTTtoim 

.OI.OG I 



-2- 



Mod 8015 Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons 



Soil 



Remarks: 1) TAL Metals: Aluminum, antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, 
cadmium, calcium, chromium, cobalt, copper, iron, lead, 
magnesium, manganese, mercury, nickel, potassium, selenium, 
silver, sodium, thallium, vanadium and zinc. 



Based on the successful analysis of the performance 
evaluation samples indicated in the table in paragraph two above, 
your laboratory will be validated for multimedia sample analysis 
by the methods listed above. The period of validation for all 
parameters has been previously established and expires on 
November 25, 1996. 

Your laboratory is also validated for an abbreviated 
analyte list for Volatile Organic Compounds (by EPA 8021) in 
water for the Lipari Landfill Offsite Remediation Project only. 
It should be noted that this parameter will not appear for your 
facility on the general list of validated labs. 

USACE reserves the right to conduct additional laboratory 
auditing or to suspend validation status for any or all of the 
listed parameters if deemed necessary. It should be noted that 
your laboratory may not subcontract USACE analytical work to any 
other laboratory location without the approval of this office. 
This laboratory validation does not guarantee the delivery of any 
analytical samples from a USACE Contracting Officer 
Representative . 

If you have any questions or comments please contact 
Ms. Elena Webster at (402) 697-2574. 

Sincerely, 





Marcia C. Davies, Ph.D. 
Director, USACE Hazardous, 
Toxic and Radioactive Waste 
Center of Expertise 






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Section: APP-6 
Issue Date:l/24/96 



WASTE STREAM TECHNOLOGY INC. 
LABORATORIES 



1. 

2. 

3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
15A 
15B 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 



Of f ice-QA/QC 

Office-Laboratory Director 

Office-Reporting 

Office-Asst. Lab Director & Analysts 

Organics Analysis Instrumentation 

Office-Chemistry Lab Supervisor & Chemists 

General Prep Laboratory 

Organics Extraction Laboratory 

ZHE, BTU, TCLP Laboratory 

Coldroom Storage Area 

Sample Archive Room 

Sample Receipt Room 

TCLP Extraction Room 

Unoccupied for Expansion 

Metals Analysis Instrumentation Area 

Inorganics Extraction Laboratory 

R&D Prep Laboratory 

R&D Laboratory 

Office-R&D Lab Technicians 

Office-Analysts 

Office-R&D Assistant Director 




ULWSTESTR£dm 



t 









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HEALTH AND SAFETY PLAN 

MASSACHUSETTS 
MILITARY RESERVATION 



/ 



Prepared by: 

SEVENSON ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES, INC. 

9245 Calumet Avenue 

Munster, Indiana 46321 



J 



August 26, 1997 



<=> 



Table of Contents 



1.0 GENERAL 

2.0 SITE DESCRIPTION AND CONTAMINATION CHARACTERIZATION 

3.0 BASIS 

4.0 PERSONNEL RESPONSIBLE FOR SAFETY AND HEALTH 

5.0 SITE CHARACTERIZATION 

6.0 WORK ZONES 

7.0 PERSONAL AND EQUIPMENT DECONTAMINATION 

8.0 HEAT STRESS 

9.0 COLD STRESS 



10.0 
11.0 
12.0 
13.0 
14.0 
15.0 
16.0 
17.0 
18.0 
19.0 
20.0 
21.0 
22.0 



MEDICAL SURVEILLANCE 

LEVELS OF PROTECTION/PERSONNEL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT 

ACTION LEVELS 

SAFETY TRAINING 

CONSTRUCTION 

COMMUNICATIONS 

STANDARD SAFETY OPERATING PROCEDURES 

EMERGENCY EQUIPMENT AND FIRST AID REQUIREMENTS 

HEARING CONSERVATION 

RECORD KEEPING 

EMERGENCY RESPONSE 

COMMUNITY PROTECTION PLAN 

AIR MONITORING 



Page g 

. 1 
. I 

. 2 
. 3 
. 5 
. 9 

. 11 

. 12 

. 15 

. 16 

. 17 
, . 20 
, . 20 
. . 24 
, . 25 
. . 26 
, . 26 
. . 27 
, . 28 
. . 30 
. . 32 
, . 33 



- 



* 



- 



FIGURES 

FIGURE 1 - Directions to Hospital 

APPENDICES 

A. HAZARD ANALYSIS 

B. CHEMICAL INFORMATION SHEETS 

C. FORMS 

D. RESPIRATOR PROGRAM 

E. LEAD PROTECTION PROGRAM 



J 



1.0 GENERAL 



j 



This Health and Safety Plan specified will meet the requirements of the specifications and 
will provide for a safe and minimal risk working environment for on-site personnel. It 
also provides for emergency response procedures to minimize any potential adverse 
impact of construction activities on the general public. 



2.0 SITE DESCRIPTION 

The Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR) is located on the upper Cape Cod, 
approximately 60 miles southeast of Boston, Massachusetts. The MMR consists of about 
21,000 acres, 14,000 of which comprise the Camp Edwards Range, Maneuver and 
Impact Area. For over 40 years, MMR has been used for military and law enforcement 
training. This training has included the firing of small arms, guns, hand grenades, 
artillery, mortar and ordnance demolition. 

The ranges where training for small arms has occurred will be the focus of this 
work. These are outdoor pistol and rifle training ranges typically consisting of 
a firing position, a cleared range area, a target position, and an impact berm. 
These ranges surround the central Impact Area and are designated as follows: A, 
B, C, D, E, G, H, I, J, K, KD, N, O, P, SW, and SE (See Figure 1). 



<S> 



J 



J 



Typically, the weapons that have been fired in these ranges are small caliber 
weapons including 50 caliber or smaller munitions, with the dominant choice 
being 5.56, 7.62 and 9 millimeter small arms rounds. The primary constituent 
of these munitions is a lead core in a metal alloy jacket, usually composed of 
copper, iron, antimony and nickel. Lead content in the .50 caliber rounds is less 
than 5%. 



3.0 BASIS 



The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Standards and Regulations, 
Parts 1910 and 1926; NIOSH/OSHA/USCG/EPA Occupational Safety and Health 
Guidance Manual for Hazardous Site Activities; and EPA Standard Operating Safety 
Guides provide the basis for the safety and health program. Additional specifications 
within this section are in addition to the regulatory requirements and reflect the positions 
of the EPA, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), and 
American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). 



<£> 



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4.0 PERSONNEL RESPONSIBLE FOR SAFETY AND HEALTH 

The following personnel are responsible for the safety and health program to be 
implemented at the site: 

1. Paul Hitcho - Health and Safety Officer (HSOV. Certified Industrial Hygienist 
(Certificate #2771) 

His duties are: 

a) Develop, implement, and enforce the site specific safety and health plan. 

b) Provide continuing health and safety support, as needed. 

c) Review results of air monitoring and accident reports. 

d) Provide regular on-site supervision and continued evaluation of the 
effectiveness of this plan. 

2. Aaron Brownell - Site Safety Officer (SSO) 

His duties are: 

a) Review and confirm changes in personal protective clothing or respiratory 
protection requirements. 

b) Ensure that all workers entering the Site have appropriate medical 
examinations and hazardous waste training. 

c) Conduct site-specific training for Contractor, Subcontractor, and all other 
authorized site personnel. 

d) Advise workers on changes related to health and safety at the Site. 

e) Provide overall supervisory control for all health and safety protocols in 
effect for the project. 

f) Conduct periodic training sessions in proper use and maintenance of 
personal protective equipment and safety practices. 

g) Work stoppage when safety conditions merit. 

h) Conduct and supervise any necessary health and safety monitoring. 

i) Supervise decontamination to ensure complete decontamination of all 

personnel, tools, and equipment. 



<b 



j) Monitor/evaluate heat and cold stress utilizing appropriate health and 

safety practices. 

k) Review all medical monitoring documentation and prepare any required 
accident/incident reports required. 

1) Assure that all personnel on-site are acquainted with the provisions of the 
health and safety plan. 

m) Conduct any necessary real-time monitoring. 

n) Prepare and review all health and safety-related documentation. 

o) Conduct any necessary baseline, personal, or daily air sampling and 
analysis utilizing appropriate pumps and media. 

p) Coordinate activities of industrial hygiene technician(s), if necessary. 

q) Inform the HSO of health and safety activities at the Site. 



Chris Rice - Project Manager 

His duties are: 

a) Overall responsibility for work operations. 

b) Allocate resources to safely perform all operations. 



Kurt McAllister - Site Superintendent 
His duties are: 

a) Responsible for performance of site work. 

b) Overall responsibility for all operations. 



<b 



<- 



■< 



5.0 SITE CHARACTERIZATION AND HAZARD ANALYSIS 

General 

During all active site work, Sevenson will implement and maintain an Accident 
Prevention Plan to ensure safe, accident free completion of the site work. Sevenson's 
designated Superintendent/Competent Person will be directly responsible for enforcing 
the Safety Plan for Contractor and Subcontractor personnel and will report directly to the 
On-Site Safety Officer any unsafe site activities as they occur. 

This project involves work with potentially contaminated material. The compound of 
concern is the metal lead. Wherever, this contamination is present, the inherent hazards 
must be considered and steps must be taken to reduce the risk of harm to the workers and 
^ the public to a reasonably low and acceptable level. 

Lead enters the body primarily through inhalation, but in some cases ingestion may be 
a significant route of entry. The adverse effects of this compound may include liver, 
kidney, nervous system, and hematopoietic damage. 

Appendix A contains a hazard analysis/safety plan phased for the major tasks to be 
accomplished. Appendix B is a compilation of information sheets for the health hazard 
present. 

The hazards that are expected to be encountered by personnel with the exception of 
possible employee exposure to the metals and heat stress due to the wearing of protective 



<b 



(C 



equipment are common to construction work. Some of these hazards and their applicable 
OSHA regulations would include: 

1. Electrical - (1926.400) 

2. Motorized equipment - (1926.600-604) 

3. Fire protection and prevention - (1926.150-152) 

4. Excavation - (1926.650) 

The other problems expected to be encountered i.e., personal protection, first aid, and 
emergency procedures are discussed more fully in other sections of this plan. 

Sevenson's Project Manager will be responsible for the administration of the accident 
prevention program. The Certified Industrial Hygienist will be responsible for the 
implementation and overview of the program while the Site Safety Officer will manage 
the program on a daily basis. The Site Safety Officer will determine whether any of the 
safety rules are being violated, advise the employee on the proper procedures(s), initiate 
any disciplinary action which may be required, conduct the weekly safety inspection, 
investigate all accidents, and make recommendations that will correct all unsafe 
conditions. 

It is anticipated that all phases of the project will have essentially the same types of 
hazards present, and there will be no change in the emphasis of our accident prevention 
program. 

All subcontractors will be required to follow the Sevenson accident prevention program. 
Subcontractor personnel will be trained in the content and procedures associated with the 



<S> 



e 



program. The Site Safety Officer will be responsible to determine subcontractor 
compliance with this program. 

There will be daily safety meetings conducted by the Site Safety Officer. The topics will 
be developed in conjunction with the Certified Industrial Hygienist. All on-site personnel 
will be required to attend the safety meetings. A log will be kept of the attendees and 
subjects covered. 

Basic fire prevention measures will be followed. A fire alarm plan is included as a 
separate section within this plan. 

The site will be kept in a neat and orderly fashion. Non-contaminated refuse will be 
disposed of on a regular basis. The disposal of contaminated material is discussed in the 
section on decontamination. 

All equipment will be inspected daily by the operator prior to operation. A form has 
been developed for this purpose (Appendix C). Motorized equipment will be checked 
to see that brake and steering mechanisms are in working order as well that all alarm 
systems and safety guards are operational. Electrical equipment will be checked to 
determine whether it is properly grounded and there are no frayed cords or other obvious 
defects. 



There will be a person on-site at all times trained and certified in first aid and 
cardiopulmonary resuscitation. There will also be an industrial first aid kit located in 

7 



<£> 



r- 



site office. All injuries and/or illnesses will be reported to the Site Safety Officer who 
will then decide on the proper course of treatment i.e., routine first aid or emergency 
medical treatment. The emergency medical treatment facility and the route to be 
followed to get there is discussed in another section of this plan. 

Sanitation will be provided in accordance with the personnel decontamination procedures 
outlined in other sections of this plan. 

All accidents will be reported to the Site Safety Officer who will then investigate the 
accident and make recommendations to prevent its reoccurrence. A written report will 
be filed. (Appendix C). 

All cutting and welding operations will require a burning permit signed by the Site Safety 
Officer. The burning permit will require the following information: 

1. Percent oxygen level 

2. Percent of lower flammable limit 

3. Vapor concentration 

4. Availability of fire extinguisher 

5. Location of nearest combustibles 

6. Welding/burning operations in compliance with OSHA regulation 
1910.252 

The testing of the atmosphere will be Sevenson's responsibility and a copy of the permit 
can be found in Appendix C. 

A confined space entry program will be required when employees enter into tanks, 
excavations, sewers, buildings with limited access, or any place with limited ventilation. 



8 



<£> 



r 



Prior to entry into a confined space, Sevenson will review with the affected personnel 
all potential hazards, proper work procedures, required safety equipment, and emergency 
procedures. It is anticipated that no confined space entry will be performed during the 
course of this project. 

All work will take place with adequate lighting provided. The minimum acceptable 
lighting for the various operations are: 



AREA OR OPERATIONS 


FOOT CANDLES 


General site areas 


5 


Excavation and waste area, accessways, active 
storage areas, loading platforms, refueling, and 
field maintenance operations. 


3 


Indoors: warehouses, corridors, hallways, and 
exitways. 


5 



6.0 WORK ZONES 

Sevenson will clearly layout and identify work areas in the field and will limit equipment, 
operations, and personnel in the area as defined below: 



a) Exclusion Zone (Contaminated or Regulated Area) - This will include all areas 
in which significantly contaminated materials are handled. This is the area in 
which material handling and treatment takes place. 

The Exclusion Zone will be clearly delineated in the field prior to commencing 
site work by fencing and warning signs spaced around the perimeter of the zone 
warning of a hazardous work area. 



<=> 



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( 



Access from the Support Zone into the Exclusion Zone will be controlled by 
surrounding the Contamination Reduction Zone with stakes, flagging, and 
warning signs. 

Access to the Exclusion Zone will be restricted to personnel who are wearing the 
proper personal protective equipment, have received the required medical 
examination, and have undergone the safety and health training. Eating, 
drinking, or smoking is prohibited in this area. 



b) Contamination Reduction Zone - This zone will occur at the interface of the 
Exclusion Zone and the Support Zone and will provide for the transfer of 
construction materials and equipment, the decontamination of transport vehicles 
handling contaminated material prior to entering the Support Zone, the 
decontamination of personnel and clothing prior to entering the Support Zone, and 
for the physical segregation of the Support Zone from the Exclusion Zone. 

Access to the Contamination Reduction Zone will be restricted to personnel who 
are wearing the proper personal protective equipment, have undergone the 
medical examination, and have participated in the training program. Eating, 
drinking, or smoking is prohibited in this area. 



c) Support Zone - This area is the remainder of the site and is defined as being 
outside the area of significant contamination. The Support Zone will be clearly 
delineated and procedures will be implemented to prevent active or passive 
contamination from the work site. The function of the Support Zone includes: 



1 . An entry area for personnel, material, and equipment to the Contamination 
Reduction Zone. 

2. An exit area for decontaminated personnel, materials, and equipment from 
the Contamination Reduction Zone. 

3. The housing of site special services. 

4. A storage area for clean, safety, and work equipment. 



The Support Zone will be clearly delineated in the field. As excavation, removal 
of contaminated materials, and backfill with clean material proceeds throughout 
the site, the delineating boundary will be continuously relocated to preclude 
recontamination of freshly decontaminated areas. 



I * 



10 



<£> 



7.0 PERSONAL and EQUIPMENT DECONTAMINATION 

Sevenson will provide and require the use of: 

a) Contained storage and disposal for used disposable outerwear; 

b) Hand/face washing facilities; and 

c) A lunch and/or break room. 

Equipment decontamination will consist of the following steps: 

1) All equipment in the Exclusion Zone will be assumed to be contaminated and will 
be decontaminated in the Contamination Reduction Zone. 

2) No vehicles shall leave the Contaminant Reduction Zone of the site until they are 
properly inspected and approved by the Safety and Health Specialist for general 
cleanliness of frame and tires. 

3) No vehicles shall leave the site unless they are in a broom clean condition, free 
of loose dirt or stabilized material on tailgates, axles, and wheels. 

4) The Site Safety Officer shall be responsible for monitoring all vehicles to confirm 
proper decontamination prior to exiting. Approval shall be based on visual 
inspection of all exposed surfaces. 

5) Personnel engaged in vehicle decontamination shall wear protective equipment 
including appropriate protective clothing and respiratory protection consistent with 
the established Health and Safety program. 



11 



<S> 



6) Sevenson will provide an equipment decontamination area within each 
Contamination Reduction Zone for removing soil from all equipment leaving the 
work area. At a minimum, this shall include a dry decontamination area for 
equipment and vehicles. A special "clean area" should be established for 
performing equipment maintenance. This area should be used when personnel are 
required by normal practices to come in contact with soil, (i.e., vehicle repair). 
All equipment being decontaminated by washdown shall be located in the 
Contamination Reduction Zone prior to maintenance work. 



8.0 HEAT STRESS 

Heat stress is one of the most common hazards encountered at a site, and there are a 
number of factors which have an effect in determining the amount of heat stress 
experienced by an individual worker. These factors include environmental conditions, 
type of clothing worn, workload, and individual characteristics. Since heat stress is a 
common hazard and has the potential to become a serious illness, Sevenson has 
developed a program to protect its employees. 

All employees will be trained in the following: 



1. Individual factors which influence an individual's susceptibility to heat. 

2. Environmental characteristics such as temperature, humidity, wind speed, and 
cloud cover. 



3. Body response to heat. 

12 



<5> 



> 



4. Effect of personal protective equipment and workload. 

5. The various types of heat disorders and their associated symptoms. 

6. Sevenson heat stress program - acclimatization, monitoring, work/rest regimen, 
and fluid intake (balanced electrolytic fluids). 



Training for the heat stress program will be conducted at the time of the initial training. 

Monitoring will be initiated when the ambient air temperature in the work area is 70°F 
or greater. The monitoring frequency will depend upon the temperature and the type of 
protective clothing worn. As the temperature increases, the monitoring will become 
more frequent. Also, if an employee is wearing impermeable protective clothing, the 
frequency of monitoring will increase. For example, at 72.5°F (adjusted temperature) 1 
and wearing an impermeable suit, an employee will be monitored after every 120 minutes 
of work. If the temperature increases to 87.5 °F (adjusted temperature) 1 , the workers will 
be monitored after every 60 minutes of work. 

The monitoring will include: 



1. Heart rate; 

2. Body temperature (oral); and 

3. Body water loss (if practicable). 



'Adjusted Temperature = Air Temperature + (13) x % Sunshine 

13 



<b 



< 



' 



' 



The heart rate will be determined for 30 seconds as soon as practicable during the rest 
period. If this heart rate exceeds 1 10 beats per minute, the next work cycle will be 
shortened by one third. 

The oral temperature will also be taken at the end of the work period. If the oral 
temperature exceeds 99.6°F, then the next work cycle will be shortened by one third. 
If the employee's body temperature exceeds 100. 6°F, he will not be assigned work which 
requires an impermeable protective suit. 

If the heat stress conditions become severe, then the Site Safety Officer or Certified 
Industrial Hygienist will recommend that body water loss be determined. The employee 
will be weighed, and the total body water loss will be kept below 1.5 percent body 
weight loss in a work day. 

The length of the work cycle will depend upon the monitoring cycle. The length of the 
rest cycle depends upon the physical monitoring results. The initial rest period will be 
15 minutes (minimum) in duration. During the 15 minute rest period the body will 
usually return to homeostasis. If not, the rest period will then be increased to ensure that 
a homeostatic condition is reached. 



14 



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* 



9.0 COLD STRESS 

During colder months (temperatures <40°), Sevenson will provide appropriate clothing 
and shelter for all workers and will monitor for cold stress. Workers who are 
continually exposed to temperatures below -10°F with wind speeds greater than 5 mph 
will be medically certified as suitable for such exposure. All workers certified will 
adhere to the work warm-up schedule as specified in the current ACGIH standards as 
outlined in the booklet entitle "Threshold Limit Values and Biological Exposure Indices". 

Since the probability of cold stress increases with the worker and/or his clothing 
becoming wet, workers will be instructed to immediately change their clothing if it 
becomes wet. In addition, workers will be instructed in the following: 

1. Proper rewarming procedures and appropriate first aid treatment. 

2. Proper clothing practices. 

3. Proper eating and drinking habits. 

4. Recognition of impending frostbite. 

5. Recognition of signs and symptoms of impending hypothermia even when 
shivering does not occur. 

6. Safe work practices. 



15 



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<* 



<" 



<* 



10.0 MEDICAL SURVEILLANCE 

Sevenson will utilize the services of physicians who are board certified in occupational 
medicine to supervise the medical surveillance program. All of Sevenson's employees 
participate in an annual medical surveillance program. 

The medical examination will consist of: 



Medical History 

General Physical, including evaluation of all major organ systems 

Pulmonary Function Examination (at least FVC and FEV 1.0) 

Electrocardiogram 

Blood Lead 

Chest X-Ray (Baseline, one scheduled every 10 years, or upon leaving 

Sevenson's employment) 

Otoscopic Examination 

Audiometric Examination 

Visual Acuity Examination 

Blood Tests, Blood Count, Blood Profile - (SMAC 25) 

Zinc Protoporphyrin 



Medical examinations will be repeated in the following conditions: 



1. More than a year has passed since the employee's last examination. 

2. The employee experiences an acute exposure to a toxic, hazardous material, or 
an injury. 

3. The Examining Physician, the Project Manager, the CIH, or SSO recommends 
one. 

4. At the request of an employee with demonstrated symptoms of exposure to toxic 
or hazardous materials. 



16 



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* 



Sevenson will obtain a certification from the occupational physician that the employee 
is medically fit to wear respiratory protection and has no medical condition that would 
place him at an increased risk. No employee will be permitted to work in the Exclusion 
Zone until his certificate has been submitted. 

If any employee who works in the Exclusion and/or Contamination Reduction Zone is 
taking prescription medicines, this information will be transmitted to the consulting 
occupational health physician who will make a determination whether this drug enhances 
the effect of the contaminants present on-site. 

All medical records will be kept for at least 30 years and will be made available to the 
Project Manager or regulatory agencies, as required. 



11.0 LEVELS OF PROTECTION/PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT 

Sevenson will provide for its personnel all necessary protective clothing and equipment 
and maintain it in accordance with the manufacturer's specifications. All equipment will 
be NIOSH approved. 

All of Sevenson's personnel who are required to wear a respirator will have to pass a fit 
test given in accordance with 29 CFR 1926.58. Respirators will not be interchanged 
between workers without cleaning and sanitizing. Cartridges will be changed daily or 
upon increased resistance. 

17 



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1 



Prescription glasses worn on-site will be safety glasses. Prescription lens inserts will be 
provided for all employees who wear a full face air purifying respirator. 

All personal protective equipment worn on-site will be decontaminated or properly 
disposed of at the end of the work day. 



The following are the various levels of protection that will be in effect for this project: 



Level D 



Work Clothing, as dictated by the weather 

Safety (steel toe/shank) shoes or boots 

Hard hat 

Safety glasses, goggles, or face shield 

Hearing Protection (for noisy areas) 

Gloves 



Level D Modified 

Same as for Level D, plus: 



Disposable, hooded, one-piece, full-body coveralls constructed of 

spun-bonded olefin or polypropylene fabric (e.g. Tyvek or 

equivalent). 

Overboots of (minimum) 60 mil rubberized PVC or neoprene 

Cotton knit gloves and nitrile gloves 



Level C 



Level D Modified PPE and: 

• Full-facepiece, air purifying respirator, organic vapor, and high 

efficiency particulate cartridges (MSHA/NIOSH approved). 



18 



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The initial minimum level of protection for each major site activity is outlined below. 
Sevenson will conform to the initial levels of protection unless an upgrade or downgrade 
is warranted by air monitoring data and an evaluation of work practices/controls. The 
task specific levels of protection shall be as listed below unless the Project Manager or 
the approved site specific Health and Safety Plan provide otherwise. 



TASK 


MINIMUM LEVEL OF 
PROTECTION 


Mobilization 


Level D 


Construction of Support Facilities (Support Zone) 


Level D 


Contaminated Material Handling 


Level D (modified) 


Ex-Situ Processing of Berm Material 


Level D (modified) 


In-Situ Processing of Berm Material 


Level D (modified) 


Replacement of Processed Material 


Level D 



Personal protective equipment downgrade will only occur when: 



The Site Safety Officer makes the change based on on-site activity, air monitoring 
of contaminant levels, and work place practices as specified in this plan. 

The Certified Industrial Hygienist approves the change with the knowledge and 
approval of the Project Manager. 



The following provisions apply to respiratory protection: 



1. Employees who are required to wear respirators must pass a pulmonary function 
test. 

2. Each time a respirator is donned the employee must perform a positive 
pressure/negative pressure fit test. 



19 



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3. No facial hair which interferes with a satisfactory fit is permitted. A "two day" 
growth of beard is considered to interfere with the fit. 

4. Cartridges and filters shall be changed daily or more frequently if breakthrough 
or increased resistance occurs. 



A copy of Sevenson's complete respirator program can be found in Appendix D. 



12.0 ACTION LEVELS 

The wearing of the various levels of protection depend upon the potential for exposure 
(inhalation, ingestion, and dermal contact), type and amount of contamination present, 
operation being performed, and other factors such as weather and instituted engineering 
controls. The following action levels along with the judgement of the Safety 
Officer/Industrial Hygienist and Site Safety Officer will be used in determining the 
proper level of protection: 



Contaminant 


Concentration (^g/m 3 ) 


Level of Protection 


Respirable Dust 


> 500 


C 


Lead 


A 50 


C 



13.0 SAFETY TRAINING 



Sevenson will provide and require that all personnel assigned to or entering the site, 
complete training or refresher sessions. Training and refresher sessions will ensure that 
all personnel are capable of and familiar with the use of safety, health, respiratory, 

20 



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^ 



protective equipment and with the safety and security procedures required for this site. 
The training session will include the OSHA mandated 40 hour training course for new 
Sevenson personnel, as well as refresher courses for those persons who have had this 
training. 

Documentation will be available to the Project Manager that each employee or 
subcontractor employee has satisfied the requirements of the OSHA training regulation 
1910.120(e). 

There will be at least one person present on-site who will be trained and certified in First 
Aid and CPR by the American Red Cross. 

In addition, all individuals functioning in a supervisory capacity will have an additional 
8 hours of specialized supervisory training. All individuals who function independently 
of an immediate supervisor will have a minimum of three days of actual field experience 
under a skilled supervisor. 

Sevenson's Certified Industrial Hygienist and/or the SSO will provide and conduct a site 
specific training program on-site for all site personnel prior to commencing work within 
the Exclusion Zone. This training program will address as a minimum the following 
topics: 



a) Potential hazards; 

b) Biology, chemistry, and physics of hazardous materials; 

21 



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c) Rights and responsibilities of workers under OSHA and Sevenson's Hazard 
Communication Program. 

d) Standard safety operating procedures; 

e) Types of monitoring equipment to be used; 
Site Safety Plan; 

g) Internal and external communications; 

h) Medical surveillance program; 

i) Personal protective clothing and equipment; 

j) Respiratory equipment including training and qualitative fit-testing for full 

facepiece respirators; 

k) Air monitoring program; 

1) Decontamination procedures; 

m) Evacuation, first aid, and emergency procedures dealing with fire and medical 
situations; 

n) Work zones established at the site; 

o) Safe work practices associated with employee's work assignment, including dust 
control measures, hazardous materials recognition, and use of the buddy system; 

p) Basic operational safety, emphasizing hazards expected on-site; 

q) Prohibitions (inside Exclusion and Contamination Reduction Zones), including: 

1. Glasses or facial hair, such as beards or long sideburns, which interfere 
with respirator fit; 

2. Contact lenses; 

3. Eating, drinking, smoking, chewing in the Exclusion or Contamination 
Reduction Zone; 

4. Wearing of personal articles, e.g. watches, rings, etc.; and 

5. Working when ill. 

r) Confined space; and 
s) Excavation. 



22 



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i <* 



«* 



All personnel assigned to the site will receive safety and health training. Upon 
completion of this training, a training acknowledgement log will be completed. The 
training acknowledgement logs will include provisions for the following information: 

a) Employee or visitor's name. 

b) Verification of topics covered, including: 

1. Materials used; 

2. Equipment demonstration; 

3. Hands-on equipment practice for each employee; 

4. Prohibitions covered; 

5. Buddy-System explanation; and 

6. Standard operating procedures. 

c) Date and signature. 

A sample of a Training Acknowledgement Log is included in Appendix C. 

All on-site personnel (contractor, subcontractor(s), and government representatives) will 
participate in weekly safety tailgate meetings that address the health and safety concerns 
presented by the day's tasks. Training attendance and participation shall be documented 
in a training log. The CIH will delegate the day-to-day implementation of this follow-up 
training to the SSO. 

All visitors will be required to undergo a training program conducted by the Site Safety 
Officer providing the training does not prevent the SSO from performing his designated 
duties consequently causing a delay in site work. The training will consist of: 

1. Hazards present at the site. 

2. Effects of these hazards. 



23 



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3. Progress of work and the relationship of the present work in regard to the type 
of hazards that may be encountered. 

4. Emergency signals and procedures. 

5. Type and limitations of personal protective equipment in use. 

6. Proper use of protective equipment. 

7. General safety rules and policies in effect at the site. 

8. Completion of a training acknowledgement log. 

14.0 CONSTRUCTION 

The following general rules will be adhered to during construction activity: 

1. All mobile equipment will be provided with working back-up alarms, brakes, and 
shut-off switches. 

2. Operators shall not leave their equipment while it is running. 

3. A daily inspection will be made by the Site Safety Officer to determine 
compliance with this plan. 

4. Illumination in the working zone will be a minimum of 10 foot candles. 
Supplementary lighting will be provided, if necessary. 

5. Electrical installations will be in compliance with the 1990 edition of the National 
Electric Code. 

6. All electrical equipment will be grounded and further protected by the use of 
ground fault circuit interrupters. 

7. An adequate number of toilet facilities will be provided. There will be at least 
one toilet for every twenty employees. 

8. A source of potable water will be provided. 

9. Food will only be consumed in prescribed clean locations. 



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e 



* 



15.0 COMMUNICATIONS 

The following emergency telephone numbers will be posted at all on-site telephones. All 
numbers in area code 508 unless otherwise noted: 





CONTACT 


TELEPHONE NUMBER 


1. 


Ambulance 


911 


2. 


Fire Department 


911 


3. 


Police Department 


911 


4. 


Falmouth Hospital 


508-548-5300 


5. 


Physician 

a. Name: Dr. Lance Simpson 

b. Address: Jefferson Medical College 

Philadelphia, PA 19207 


215-955-8381 


6. 


Poison Control Center 


800-962-1253 


7. 


USEPA National Response Center 


800-438-2427 


8. 


Range Control 


968-5925 


9. 


MMR Ambulance 


968-4111 


10. 


MMR Fire Department 


968-4117 


11. 


MMR Police Department 


968-4222 



Communication between the various work zones and areas may take place through the 
use of hand held radios. 



Communication between workers in the Exclusion Zone will be accomplished through 
the use of established hand signals such as: 



1. Thumbs Up - Everything is Okay. 

2. Hands on Top of Head - Need Assistance. 

3. Grabbing Buddy's Wrist or Waist - Leave Area Immediately! 

4. Grabbing Throat - Out of Air, Can't Breathe. 



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16.0 STANDARD SAFETY OPERATING PROCEDURES 



The following general safety rules will be in effect for all site personnel: 

1. Eating, drinking, smoking, chewing gum or tobacco, applying and wearing make 
up, and other practices that increase the probability of hand-to-mouth transfer and 
ingestion of material is prohibited in any area designated contaminated. 

2. Hands and face shall be thoroughly washed upon leaving the work area and 
before eating, drinking, urinating, or other activities. 



3. Medicine and alcohol can increase the effects of exposure to toxic chemicals. 
Therefore: 

a) Personnel using prescription drugs shall inform the doctor who prescribed 
them of their potential contact with toxic materials. 

b) Personnel who take over-the-counter drugs within a day before work on 
a site must inform the SSO of the warnings listed on the drug's container 
(the part of the label that says, for example, "Do not take this medication 
if you are operating a motor vehicle"). 

c) Alcoholic beverage intake shall be prohibited during project operations. 
Personnel under the influence of alcohol or recreational or illegal drugs 
will not be allowed on-site. 



17.0 EMERGENCY EQUIPMENT AND FIRST AID REQUIREMENTS 

Sevenson will provide the following emergency and first aid equipment: 

1. Industrial type first aid kit which includes a burn kit. 

2. Fire extinguishers. 



26 



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One emergency eye wash unit and one 2A: 10B:C fire extinguisher will be placed in the 
Contamination Reduction Zone. First Aid units will be located at a manned location. 
In isolated work areas they will be located in close proximity to the work. 

Fire extinguishers will also be placed at: 

1. Project Manager's Office 

2. Construction Equipment 

3. Sevenson's Office 

All emergency equipment will be checked weekly to determine its availability and 
whether it is functioning properly. 



18.0 HEARING CONSERVATION 

When noisy operations make normal conversation difficult, sound level pressure meter 
readings will be taken to document noise exposure to on-site personnel. Previous sound 
level pressure readings have been taken and it has been determined that the heavy 
equipment exceeds 85dBA. Therefore, all operators and laborers in close perimeter to 
the equipment will participate in a hearing conservation program. The hearing 
conservation program consists of the use of personal protection (ear plugs or muffs), 
audiometric examinations, and employee training. All on-site employees are given the 
audiometric examination and the training. 



27 



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19.0 RECORD KEEPING 

Sevenson will maintain all records documenting the implementation of this site safety and 
health plan. The records will include: 



1. Training logs 

2. Daily logs 

3. Weekly reports 

4. Real time air monitoring 

5. Documentation of safety meetings 

6. Decontamination logs 

7. Monitoring equipment calibration sheets 

8. Permit for open flame or welding 

9. Confined space entry permit 

10. Accident report 

11. Employee/visitor register 

12. Medical certifications 

13. Training certifications 



A copy of the forms to be used can be found in Appendix C. 

If an accident, an explosion or fire, or a release of toxic materials occurs during the 
course of the project, the Project Manager will be telephoned immediately and receive 
a written notification within 24 hours. The report shall include the following items: 



Name, organization, telephone number, and location of the Contractor. 

Name and title of the person(s) reporting. 

Date and time of the accident/incident. 

Location of the accident/incident, i.e., site location, facility name. 

Brief summary of the accident/incident giving pertinent details including type of 

operation ongoing at the time of the accident/incident. 

Cause of the accident/incident, if known. 

Casualties (fatalities, disabling injuries). 

Details of any existing chemical hazard or contamination. 

Estimated property damage, if applicable. 



28 



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Nature of damage, effect on contract schedule. 

Action taken by the Contractor to ensure safety and security. 

Other damage or injuries sustained, public or private. 



Daily safety inspection logs will be submitted to the Project Manager for review and 
include the following items: 



• Date 

• Areas inspected 

• Employees in the particular areas 

• Equipment being utilized by the employees named 

• Protective clothing and equipment being worn by the employees 

• Air monitoring results 

• Signature of SSO 



Weekly Reports will include: 

• Summary sheet covering the range of work being done. 



• 



Any incidents of: 

- Non-use of protective devices in an area where required 

- Non-use of protective clothing 

- Disregard of buddy system 

- Violation of eating, smoking, and chewing in prohibited areas 

- Misuse of any of the above 

- Job related injuries and illness 
Site Safety Officer signature and date. 

Date specified for the weekly report to be in the office of the Project Manager. 
Copies of daily logs. 



Employee's and Visitor's Logs shall include: 

• Date 

• Name 

• Address 

• Representing Agency or Company 

• Time entering site 

• Time exiting site 



29 



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* 



Information on the training log will include: 

• Name of person(s) being trained 

• Topics covered 

• Materials used 

• Equipment demonstrated 

• Prohibitions covered 

• Signature of trainer and date 



20.0 EMERGENCY RESPONSE 

The types of emergencies that could occur on the project site include fire and medical 
emergencies. 

The following steps are taken in the event of fire to reduce the possibility of the spread 
of contamination and to assure that individuals are not exposed above acceptable limits: 



1. Should a fire occur, every effort should be made by trained contractor employees 
equipped with the proper respiratory protection gear to suppress it using hand 
held fire extinguishers. 

2. The SSO and the Project Manager are notified at once. 

3. The local fire department is notified by the Project Manager if the fire cannot be 
handled safely by contractor employees. 



The procedures listed below are to be followed in case of employee injury. 

When the medical situation allows, precautions to prevent the spread of contamination 
are taken. These may include: 



30 



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c 



1 . Removing the injured individual's contaminated clothing and protective equipment 
within the Exclusion Zone; 

2. Wrapping the injured individual in sheets to contain contamination; 

3. The use of plastic sheeting to protect ambulance interiors and hospital facilities 
from becoming contaminated; and 

4. The use of protective clothing and contamination control techniques by rescue and 
medical facility. 



Note: Medical actions will always take priority. 

A map with directions to the emergency medical facility (Falmouth Hospital) will be 
posted at each telephone (Figure 1). 



The basic outline of the fire alarm program is as follows: 



1) The alarm system will be activated when any on-site personnel notices the 
presence of a fire. Initial warnings will be sent out to all personnel carrying a 
radio, who will then be responsible for notifying their respective crews. 

2) As soon as the initial alarm to on-site personnel is completed and evacuation is 
under way, outside assistance will be immediately requested if deemed necessary 
by the Safety Officer. 

3) Personnel not intrinsically involved in on-site emergency response procedures will 
evacuate to an area upwind of the fire. If the fire can be treated with a fire 
extinguisher, personnel closest to the fire will obtain a fire extinguisher and 
attempt to extinguish the fire. This will be attempted only if there is minimum 
risk to the personnel involved. Sevenson personnel have received training in the 
use of fire extinguishers, but they have not received fire brigade training as 
outlined by OSHA. 



31 



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21.0 COMMUNITY PROTECTION PLAN 

1. Purpose 

The purpose of this community protection plan is to: 

a) Prevent exposure of area residents to air contaminants above the levels 
established for general public exposure by the EPA. 

b) Prevent the spread of contamination from the worksite to soil, water or 
sediment near the site. 

c) Prevent violations of EPA regulations. 

2. Personnel and Responsibilities 

The following personnel and their assigned responsibilities are as follows: 

a) Doug Austin. P.E. - Community Protection Officer 

Mr. Austin has the authority to command the resources of Sevenson 
Environmental Services, Inc. to perform the work described in the 
contract documents without harm to the community. 

b) Paul Hitcho - Certified Industrial Hygienist 

His duties are to provide Sevenson Environmental Services, Inc. with 
specialized information on monitoring for, and control of chemical, 
physical, and biological hazards. He will approve the industrial hygiene 
and industrial safety aspects of the site specific Health and Safety Plan. 

3. Implementation 

Sevenson will provide all equipment, materials, and personnel necessary to 
protect the general public from injury or exposure to physical and/or chemical 
agents. 



32 



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c 



Sevenson will provide real-time air monitoring for dust using a respirable airborne dust 
monitor (MIE Miniram or equivalent) and initiate mitigation action to control dust when 
levels exceed 0.500 mg/m 3 . The areas to be monitored include: 

1. Upwind perimeter of the work zone. 

2. Downwind perimeter of the work zone. 

3. Adjacent to material handling, staging, treatment, and loading operations.. 

Any departures from general background will be considered by the Site Safety Officer 
and Project Manager who under the advisement of the Certified Industrial Hygienist will 
determine when operations should be shut down, levels of protection upgraded, dust 
suppression techniques implemented, and/or emergency response/contingency plans 
initiated. 

Real-time air monitoring will be conducted by the SSO. The sampling will occur at the 
area where the potential for contaminant generation is highest. It will be done on an 
hourly basis. An upwind sample will be taken every 4 hours. 

1. Data 

A data sheet will be utilized by the Site Safety Officer to record the following 
real-time monitoring data information: 

• Date and time of monitoring; 

• Air monitoring location; 



34 



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• Instrument, model number, serial number; 

• Calibration/background levels; 

• Results of monitoring; and 

• Site Safety Officer signature. 

Interpretation of the data and further recommendations by the Certified Industrial 
Hygienist or the Site Safety Officer in consultation with the Certified Industrial Hygienist 
will be made. 

These results will be given verbally to the Project Manager following each site scan that 
indicates concentrations in excess of the action levels and documented in writing by the 
end of each work day with three (3) copies provided. 

A personal air monitoring program will be implemented to comply with applicable OSHA 
regulations, determine the effectiveness of the personal protective equipment program, 
and to try to obtain a correlation between the real-time and integrated monitoring. 
Samples will be taken on the employees who have the highest potential for exposure as 
determined by the CIH and SSO. This sampling will take place at the start of each 
hazardous operation in each area. NIOSH sampling and analytical procedures will be 
followed. 

Integrated perimeter monitoring will also be conducted. One upwind and two downwind 
samples will be taken daily. The daily set of samples for the week corresponding to the 



35 



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^ 



V 



highest real-time monitoring results will be analyzed weekly. NIOSH sampling and 
analytical procedures will be followed. 

2. Summary 

Air Monitoring Program 



Contaminant 


Instrument 


Location 


Frequency 


Respirable Particulate 
Respirable Particulate 


MIE Miniram, 

RAM-1, or Sibata P5-H2 

MIE Miniram, 

RAM-1, or Sibata P5-H2 


Downwind Perimeter 

Work Area - Material 
Handling and Treatment 


Every 2 hours. 
Every 2 hours 


Lead 


Sampling Pump with 
Appropriate Filter 
(NIOSH 7082) 


Worker - Exclusion Zone 


Start of Each 

Hazardous 

Operation 


Lead 


Sampling Pump with 
Appropriate Filter 
(NIOSH 7082) 


Perimeter (1 upwind & 2 
downwind) 


Daily with 
Weekly Analysis 



36 



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FIGURE 1 
DIRECTIONS TO HOSPITAL 



<£> 



PUG-27-1997 12=18 



OGDEN MMR 



1 508 563 9048 P. 03 



Draft Final MMR Health and Safety Plan 
Date: May . 1 997 



Page: 



62 of 63 



to 




Map is a modulation of Jacobs Engineering Hospital Route Map 



Figure 4 
Camp Edwards Impact Area Study 

Hospital Route Map 



TOTAL P. 03 



• 



APPENDIX A 
HAZARD ANALYSIS 



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APPENDIX B 
CHEMICAL INFORMATION SHEETS 



• 



<b 



1 



* * * ********** 

* 
* 

* Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety * 

* m *********************** ******** 



******************** 

M S D S * 

* 



RECORD NUMBER 
.ANGUAGE 
PRODUCT NAME(S) 
)ATE OF MSDS 



*** IDENTIFICATION *** 

605431 
ENGLISH 
LEAD METAL 
1991-09-24 



*** MANUFACTURER INFORMATION *** 



MANUFACTURER 

ADDRESS 

EMERGENCY TELEPHONE NO.(S) 



: Cominco Ltd 

Trail Operations 
: Trail British Columbia 

Canada VlR 4L3 
: 604-364-4214 



SUPPLIER/ DISTRIBUTOR 
ADDRESS 



LERGENCY TELEPHONE NO.(S) 



*** SUPPLIER INFORMATION *** 



Cominco Metals 

A Division of Cominco Ltd 

1500-120 Adelaide Street West 

Toronto Ontario 

Canada M5H 1T1 

604-364-4214 



*** MATERIAL SAFETY DATA *** 

Material Safecy Data Sheet 
SECTION I - PRODUCT IDENTIFICATION 



Material Name: LEAD 

Product Identification Number (PIN): 

Chemical Name, Trade Names, Synonyms 

Metallic Lead 

TADANAC (R) Lead 

WHMIS Class 

Class D - Poisonous and Infectious 
Material. 2. Materials Causing Other 
Toxic Effects. 



Hazard Ratings 
Health 2 
Flammability 
Reactivity 



SECTION II - HAZARDOUS INGREDIENTS 
Hazardous Ingredients 



Approximate 
Cor.ccn. I 



C. A.S. 

Number 



Lead 



9 9 
.Exposure Limits 

0. 15 mg/m.3 ACGIH 
0.0 5 :ag/:n3 OSHA 
LD50/LC50 Specify Species and Route 



7 4 39-92-1 



w. 



No cUita 



ON III - PHYSICAL DATA 



nysical State Solid 

dour and Appearance Odourless ... Mai leable , Silver-grey metal 

dour Threshold (ppm) None 

pecific Gravity 11.3 

apour Pressure (mm) Negligible 

apour Density (Air=l) Not Applicable 

vaporation Rate Not Applicable 

oiling Point (cleg C) 1740 

reezing Point (deg C) 327 

olubility in Water (20 deg C) Insoluble 

Volatile (by volume) Not Applicable 

H Not Applicable 

[elting Point (deg C) 328 

iolecular Weight 207 

;ECTI0N IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARDS 

Idiumabi 1 iLy . . .If yes, under which conditions? 

Massive metal is not flammable; however, dust or powder nay be flammable, 
leans of Extinction 

Use dry chemical, carbon dioxide, water spray or foam. 
Special Procedures 

Firefighters must wear self-contained breathing apparatus and protective 
clothing . 
i^Pfch Point (deg C) and Method 

'ot Applicable 
Jpper Flammable Limit (% by volume) 

Not Applicable 
lower Flammable Limit (% by volume) 

Not Applicable 
Auto Ig.-.ition Temperature (deg C) 

Not Applicable 
TDG Flammability Classification 

Not Applicable 
Hazardous Combustion Products 

Lead oxide fume 
Explosion Data/Sensitivity to Mechanical Impact 

None 
Rate of 3urning 

None 
Explosive Power 

No daca 
Sensitivity to Static; Discharge 
None 

SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA 

Chemical Stability 

Yes Massive metai is stable. 

incompatibility with Other Substances 

™es Lead reacts with strong oxidizers 

such as Hydrogen Peroxide, 
Chlorine Trifluoride and active 



azardous Decomposition Products 



metals . 

Toxic Lead oxide fume will form 
at elevated temperatures. 



ECTION VI - HEALTH EFFECTS 

oute of Entry 

] Skin Contact 
X] Inhalation Acute 



[ ] Skin Absorption 
[X] Inhalation Chronic 



[X] Eye Contact 
[X] Ingestion 



ffects of Acute Exposure to Product 
Inhalation of Lead fume or dust can cause local irritation to the 
respiratory system. Inhalation and/or ingestion of Lead fume or dust may 
cause headache, nausea, abdominal pain, fatigue and pain in the legs, arms 
and joints. 

:ffects of Chronic Exposure to Product 

Prolonged exposure to Lead fume or dust by inhalation may cause faViyuo, 
gastrointestinal pain, anemia, possible central nervous system daiu-uq**' and 
possible kidney dysfju-nction . Reproductive and mutagenic effe<~tr-. •?..;.- i.-,^ 
been cited (RTECS 1987) . Lead and lead compounds are listed by IAkC as 
possible carcinogens. 



:arcmogen 
'eratogen 



[X] 

C 1 



Reproductive Effects [X] 
Mutagen [X] 



SECTION VII - PREVENTIVE MEASURES 



Personal Protective Equipment 

^fe~ fume or dust is generated, use an approved fume/dust respirator and eye 

-_ rotection . 
lloves 

Leather or impervious (vinyl) type. 
Respiratory 

Approved fume/dust respirator. 
Eye 

Goggles or faceshield with molten metal. 
Footwear 

Safety type boots, 
"icthing 

Protective outer garment. 
)ther 

Avoid use of contact lenses in fume or du^ty areas. 
Engineering Controls 

Provide local and general ventilation when. fume or dust is generated, to 

maintain ambient levels below exposure lirr.its. 
L,eak and Spill Procedures 

Contain spill. If solid metal wear gloves, pick up and return to process 

If dust, wear recommended personal protection. Use a vacuum, place in 

barrels and return to process. 
Waste Disposal 

Material Fiho'ild be returned to orocess or s a l vago . Dispo^ of r »"ly i *■ *■ " 

accordance with applicable regulations, 
i^dling Procedures and Equipment 
(BPnly dry metals should bo added to molten bath. If working with molten 

metal, or exposed to fume or dust, use appropriate personal protective 

equ ipment . 



' 



torage Requirements 

Store product in a dry, covered area, away from incompatible materials, 
pecial Shipping Information 

^^llow applicable regulations when shipping or transporting. 



#' 



ACTION VIII - FIRST AID MEASURES 

kin Remove contaminated clothing and wash affected area with soap 

and water, 
ye Flush with water; if irritation persists, seek medical 

attention . 
nhalation Remove from exposure. Support breathing, administer oxygen if 

required and seek medical attention immediately. 
ingestion If patient is conscious, give plenty of water and induce 

vomiting. Seek medical attention immediately. 
General Advice Biological monitoring of workers exposed to Lead fume or dusc 

is recommended to prevent undue Lead absorption- Good 

personal hygiene is essential. Avoid eating, smoking or 

drinking in work areas. 

SECTION IX - PREPARATION OF M.S.D.S 

Prepared by 

Occupational Health Department 
Phone Number 

(604) 354-4319 
Preparation Date 

1991-09-24 
Additional Information and Comments 



MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET SEVENSON ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES. INC. 

MAECTITE* REAGENT (MAEPRIC) 

This product safety information sheet is principally directed to managerial, safety, hygiene, and medical 
(^personnel. The description of physical, chemical, and toxicological properties and handling advice is 
based upon experimental results and past experience. It is intended as a starting point for the 
development of health and safety procedures. 

I. PRODUCT INFORMATION 

Trade Name: MAECTITE* 

Composition: Trade Secret held by Sevenson; exemption referenced to 29 CFR 1910.1200. 

II. PHYSICAL DATA 

Physical State (75°F/23.9°C at 14.7 psia): Brown viscous liquid mixture 

Specific Gravity (at 75°F/23.9°C) (water = 1.0): 1.68 

Density (at 68°F/20°C): 13.8 lbs/gal 

Boiling Point (STP): 275°F/135°C 

Melting Point: -38°F 

Vapor Pressure lot 77°F): ISmmHg 

Water Miscibility: Miscible in all proportions 

Odor: Acrid odor 

pH: 2.1 (1 % aqueous solution) 

Flash Point: None 



III. CHEMICAL REACTIVITY 

This material is both a strong acid and a dehydrating agent. It may splatter upon contact with water 
or water-containing chemicals and solvents. It reacts violently with bases. Refer to Section X for 
information regarding chemical reactivity with metals. 

IV. STABILITY 

This material is stable at atmospheric pressures and normal use conditions. It will freeze at low 
temperatures (see Section I). 

V. FIRE HAZARD 

Under fire conditions, this material may decompose to give off irritating fumes. Contact with common 
metals may produce hydrogen which may form flammable mixtures with air. 

VI. FIREFIGHTING TECHNIQUE 

Vapors are irritating to the respiratory tract and may cause breathing difficulty and pulmonary edema. 
As in an fire, prevent human exposure to fire, smoke, furr.es, or products of combustion. Evacuate 
nonessential personnel from the fire area. 

When there is a potential for exposure to fire, smoke, fumes, products of combustion, etc., firefighters 
should wear full-face, self-contained breathing apparatus and impervious clothing such as gloves, 
hoods, suits, and rubber boots. 



^^ 



Use standard firefighting techniques to extinguish fires involving this product - use dry chemicals, 
foam, or carbon dioxide. Water and/or water-based foam can also be used; the amount should be large 
enough to avoid heat and acid buildup. If not leaking, use water to keep fire-exposed containers cool. 



sevenson environment! service:;, mc. 



VII. TOXICOLOGY 

DANGER: Corrosive - causes burns. Do not get in eyes, or skin, or on clothing. Avoid breathing 

mists. 

Ingestion Severe internal irritation and damage can result if ingested 
(LD M RAT = 1.530 mg/kg). 

Skin Contact Corrosive to rabbit skin following a one-hour exposure. 

Eve Contact Corrosive to rabbit eyes. Contact of the liquid with the eyes may result in irritation or 
severe burns depending upon the extent of exposure. 

Inhalation Inhalation of the fumes may result in irritation of the nose, throat, and respiratory tract. 

VIII. FIRST AID 

CALL A PHYSICIAN IMMEDIATELY. 

If a known exposure occurs or is suspected, immediately initiate the recommended procedures below. 
Simultaneously contact a poison control center, a physician, or the nearest hospital, inform the person 
contacted of the type and extent of exposure, describe the victim's symptoms, and follow the advice 
given. For additional information, call CHEMTREC collect, day or night, at (800) 424-9300. For 
CHEMTREC assistance when calling from Washington DC, Virgin Islands, Guam, Samoa, Puerto Rico, 
or Alaska, call (202) 483-7616 collect, day or night. 

Ingestion Do NOT induce vomiting. Immediately give large quantities of water. If vomiting does 
occur, give fluids again. Do not induce vomiting or give anything by mouth to an unconscious person. 
Call a physician or the nearest poison control center immediately. 

Skin Contact Immediately flush all affected areas with large amounts of water for AT LEAST 15 
MINUTES. Remove all contaminated clothing and shoes while under a safety shower wiping away 
excess material from the skin. Do not attempt to neutralize with chemical agents. Obtain medical 
advice immediately. Discard contaminated clothing and shoes. 

Eye Contact Immediately flush the eyes with large quantities of running water for a minimum of 1 5 
minutes. Hold the eyelids apart during the flushing to ensure rinsing of the entire surface of the eye 
and lids with water. Do not attempt to neutralize with chemical agents. Obtain medical attention as 
soon as possible. Oils or ointments should not be used. Continue the flushing for an additional 15 
minutes if the physician is not immediately available. 

Inhalation Remove from contaminated atmosphere. If breathing has ceased, clear the victim's airway 
and start mouth-to-mouth artificial respiration, which may be supplemented by the use of a bag-mask 
respirator or a manually triggered oxygen supply capable of delivering one liter/second or more. If the 
victim is breathing, oxygen may be delivered from a demand-type or continuous-flow inhaiator, 
preferably with a physician's advice. 

IX. INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE 

All food should be kept in a separate area away from the storage/use location. Eating, drinking, and 
smoking should be prohibited in areas where there is a potential for significant exposure to this 
material. Before eating, hands and face should be thoroughly washed. 

Skin Contact Skin contact with liquid or its aerosol must be prevented through the use of impervious 
clothing, gloves, and footwear, selected with regard for use condition exposure potential. 

Eye Contact Eye contact with liquid or its aerosol must bs prevented through the use of chemical 
goggles or a faceshield. selected with regard for use condition exposure potential. 

2 Seven sun Environmental Services, inc. 



Inhalation If use conditions generate airborne liquid or aerosol, the material should be handled in an 
open (e.g., outdoor) or well-ventilated area. Where adequate ventilation is not available, NIOSH- 
approved respirators should be employed to reduce exposure. Respirator selection must address the 
potential for exposure under the use conditions. 

Either half-face respirators in combination with chemical goggles or full-face respirators may be 
required in certain use conditions to prevent eye contact or irritation. 

Employee Exposure Limits The permissible exposure limit (PEL) for MAECTITE® solution is 1 mg/m 3 . 
The threshold limit value (TLV) time-weighted average for MAECTITE® solution is 1 mg/m 3 ; the short 
term exposure limit (STEL) is 3 mg/m 3 . 

PEL'S and TLV's refer to airborne concentrations measured in the breathing zone by appropriate 
sampling techniques. 

X. SPILL HANDLING 

Make sure all personnel involved in the spill cleanup follow good industrial hygiene practices (refer to 
Section VIII). 

Small spills can be handled routinely. If mists or vapors are generated, use adequate ventilation and 
wear a respirator to prevent inhalation. Wear suitable protective clothing and eye protection to prevent 
skin and eye contact. Use the following procedures: 

Neutralize the spill area with soda ash and then flush the area with copious amounts of water. 
Exercise caution during neutralization as considerable heat may be generated. 

Large spills should be handled according to a predetermined plan. Prevent large quantities from 
contacting waterways or vegetation. For assistance in developing a plan, contact Sevenson 
Environmental Services, Inc., 9245 Calumet Ave., Suite 101, Munster, Indiana 46321 
(219) 836-0116. 

XI. CORROSIVITY TO MATERIAL OF CONSTRUCTION 

Stainless steel (316 ELC) Teflon"* or polypropylene are the preferred materials of construction for 
process equipment, storage, and shipping containers. This material is corrosive to common metals 
such as mild steel, copper, brass, and bronze and may generate flammable hydrogen gas as a result 
of this reaction. Type 304 stainless steel is not recommended. 

XII. STORAGE CONDITIONS 

Containers should be stored in a cool, dry, well-ventilated area. Exercise due caution to prevent 
damage to or leakage from the container. 

The following safety facilities should be readily accessible in all areas where this material is hanaied 
or stored: 

Safety Showers with quick opening valves which stay open. Water should be supplied through 
insulated and heat traced lines to prevent freeze-ups in cold weather. 

Eye Wash Fountains or other means of washing the eyes with a gentle flow of tap water. 



Sevenson Environmental Services, Inc. 



XIII. DISPOSAL OF UNUSED MATERIAL 

If uncontaminated, recover and reuse product. For assistance in disposing of unused material contact 
Sevenson Environmental Services, Inc.. 9245 Calumet Ave.. Suite 101, Munster, Indiana 46321, 
(219) 836-0116. 

XIV. DISPOSAL OF CONTAINER 

Thoroughly rinse and offer empty container for recycling, reconditioning, or disposal in an approved 
landfill or dispose of in such a manner that will not adversely affect the environment. 



In case of suspected exposure, refer to the procedures and emergency contacts in Section VII, 
First Aid. 

In case of spillage, refer to the procedures and emergency contacts in Section IX, Spill 
Handling. 

In case of animal poisoning, call a veterinarian or call CHEMTREC collect, day or night, at (800) 
424-9300. 

In case of contamination of other materials, call CHEMTREC at (800) 424-9300. 

NOTE: For CHEMTREC assistance when calling from Washington DC, Virgin Islands, Guam, 
Samoa, Puerto Rico, or Alaska, call (202) 483-7616 collect, day or night. 



Although the information contained herein is offered in good faith, SUCH INFORMATION IS 
EXPRESSLY GIVEN WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY (EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED) OR ANY GUARANTEE OF 
ITS ACCURACY OR SUFFICIENCY and is taken at the user's sole risk. The user is solely responsible 
for determining the suitability of use in each particular situation. SEVENSON specifically DISCLAIMS 
ANY LIABILITY WHATSOEVER FOR THE USE OF SUCH INFORMATION, including without limitation 
any recommendations which user may construe and attempt to apply which may infringe or violate 
valid patents, licenses, and/or copyrights. 



Sevenson Environmental Services. Inc. 



APPENDIX C 
FORMS 



• 



<b 



TRAINING ACKNOWLEDGEMENT FORM 



NAME: 



ADDRESS: 



SOCIAL SECURITY NO. 



EMPLOYER: 



I have- completed and understand the training program for work to be carried out during 
work at the Site, including the following topics: 

a. Work Rules and Safety Requirements 

b. Personal Protection Equipment 

c. Potentially Hazardous Chemicals 

d. Emergency Equipment and Plan 

e. Reporting Injuries and Illnesses 

f. Emergency Procedures 

g. Job Assignment 
h. Personal Hygiene 
i. Medical Tests 

j. Standard Operating Procedures 

k. Applicable Rules and Regulations 

I further confirm that a respirator qualitative fit test was performed and that I have been 
issued a respirator of the same type. 



Survey Site Personnel 



Signature: 



Date: 



I certify that this Survey Site Person has received adequate safety training and instruction 
and that this person is proficient in the use of protective clothing and equipment and 
knowledgeable in all aspects of the Health and Safety Plan. 



Safetv Officer 



Signature: 



Date: 



nM:riE.^L7n'CGI<?'j : OS-M^.TR>lA(_K 




SOCIAL SECURITY NO 



EMPLOYER: 



I have-completed and understand the training program for work to be carried out during 
work at the Site, including the following topics: 



Work Rules and Safety Requirements 

Personal Protection Equipment 

Potentially Hazardous Chemicals 

Emergency Equipment and Plan 

Reporting Injuries and Illnesses 

Emergency Procedures 

Job Assignment 

Personal Hygiene 

Medical Tests 

Standard Operating Procedures 

Applicable Rules and Regulations 



I further confirm that a respirator qualitative ill test was performed and that I have been 
issued a respirator of the same type. 



a. 
b. 
c. 
d. 
e. 
f. 

o 

h. 
i. 



Suivey Site Personnel 
j Signature: 



Date: 



I certify that this Survey Site Person has received adequate safety training and instruction 
and that this person is proficient in the use of protective clothing and equipment and 
knowledgeable in all aspects of the Health and Safety Plan. 



Safety Officer 
Signature: 



Date: 



HM:liiiALI ri\CG!t/\rOAMiVi t>Av_.s 



DAILY SAFETY LOG 



DATE: / / 



WORK PERIOD COVERED: 



WEATHER CONDITIONS: 



SUMMARY OF DAY'S WORK ACTIVITY: 



EQUIPMENT UTILIZED 3Y SAFETY MONITORS: 



PROTECTIVE CLOTHING AND EQUIPMENT 3EING USED BY TASK: 



'HYSICAL CONDITION OF WORKERS (j.-.v fc ei( or cold s:r=» or ouScr rnc^c*! problem*): 



ACCIDENTS OR 3REACK OF PROCEDURES: 



DESCRIPTION OF MONITORING AND AIR SAMPLES TAKEN: 



I ! 



| MISCELLANEOUS: 



k 



AME: 



TTTLE: 



SIGNATURE: 

0v« iirvvLi !CCu37>! «*.^<vuiAf tEST, 



( 



WEEKLY SAFETY REPORT 



Week Ending: 



SUMMARY OF ANY VIOLATIONS OF PROCEDURES OCCURRING THAT WEEK: 



SUMMARY OF ANY JOB RELATED INJURIES OR ILLNESSES THAT WEEK: 



SUMMARY OF AiR MONITORING DATA THAT WEEK (Include an/ sample 2; 
exceeded, and actions taken): 



•iyses. action levels 



COMMENTS: 



ATTACH METEOROLOGICAL STATION DATA. 



T 



Nairn: 



Signature: 



icm ;cLAi.:;rxuwu5jJ: 



( 



DAILY CALIBRATION DATA 



DATE: / / 



HYG1ENIST: 



HNU: 



SPAN GAS CONCENTRATION i SPAN ADJUSTMENT 

i 



COMMENTS 



OXYGEN METER/EXPL0SIME7E! 



SI3ATA 



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DAILY SAFETY CHECK 










DAY: 

I 


DATE: 


START 
J INSPECTION: 


COMPLETE 
INSPECTION: 






1 QUESTION 


(Please check one ot' the follow-iag boxes): 




YES | 


NO 


N/A 


I. Arc a!i fire hazard areas properly posted? 








1 

2. Are safety ca::s boiug used for gasoliae? 


| | 


3 Do all scaffolds have rails anil toeboarcs 


T.:cr::\y secured? 




i 1 
! 1 


I . , 

II 4. Do ail ruaways have guardrails? 


| 




i 

I 5. Are all wail opeaings adjacent to a drop • 


rxceecmg 4' properly railed off? 


| 







i-. Are oa-xOio aiarms wor.<ja? oa tae e:::::'. 



:s that are ruaniav; todav? 



6. Do all floor opeaiags have rails and :oe boards properly secured? 


| 






7. Do a!', ladder-way floor opeaiags have ga:e or offset? 




3. Do aii ladders provide safe access to al! eleva-^ons? 


! 1 

! 1 


,L 9. Are excavations properly sloped? 


i 
1 




IwiO. .Are ali employees provided with hard aaa? 


1 

i 




11. Do all saws have safety guards? 

1 


| 


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il 12. Are aii :rades doine adeauace house:<ee3:r.;'? 

l! b 


i 

i 


1 1 3. Are ail open excavations properly ba.-r-.c-.cec. etc.? 


j 

i 





5. Are :";:e extiaguisaers provided 



!f you have answered no to any of the above I'.-ems. explain on the reverse side. 




i have checked the total project. To the be*: of my knowledge all safety cieasures have been completed. 



Responsible for Safety 



THIS FORM IS TO FT. UET'uttNKD TO THE OFFICE AT THE END OF EACH DAY 



DATE: / / 



DAILY SAFETY MEETING 



TOPIC: 



PERSONNEL: 



km hcau ECCOJtPirOVQCGToAXTSSl 



FITTING TEST RECORD 



NAME: 



DATE: 



/ / 



RESPIRATOR: 



RESULTS 



Isoamyl Acetate 



Irritant Smoke 



Other 



FIT 



NO FIT 






v-uivLruiv l 



Verv Comfortable 



j v^uiruuitabie 



loieraoie 



Uncomfortable 



Very Uncomfortable 



COMMENTS: 



SIGNATURES: 



N.AME: 



DATE: 



/ / 



RESPIRATOR: 













[1 





RESULTS 




|| 


Isoamyi Acetate 


Irritant Smoke 


OUiL: 




1 , .... 
1 FIT 1 








1 l 

NORT 






■1 


1 COMFORT: 


Very Comfortable 


Comfortable 


Tolerable 


li 

1 
1 


i 


Uncomfortable 


Very Uncomfortable j 


I COMMENTS: 






i 


j SIGNATURES: ! 


1 






i 

1 



HM : \U1 A LT h"\CO RP\FO R.V.SVFTTT P.ST 



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VIOLATION OF SAFETY RULES REPORT 



Project Name: 



Project Number: 



Job Superintendent: 



Date of this Report: 



Nature of Violation 
(Explain) 




II 

d 

ii 








ii 

i 
i 


! i 


i| Actioa Taken: j 


L 


Warning Given: 




1 

1 


Sent Home: 


1 
1 


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Discharged: 


il 


It 

Witness: 

it 


j 


Date: 


1 
1 


ii 

Ii 
| 




(If refusal so stats) | 




Offending Company: 




il 
Date: il 

i 
i 

! 


(If refusal so stats) 




i Offending Person: 




Date: 

i 'i 




(If refusal so state) 




Report By: 




Date: 


ii 

i 

1 

i 




(Posiiion or Title) 




;v_ 




1 



KM:HEALTH\CORP\FORMS\VIOLAT 



«* 




1. Job description and equipment used: 













, II. Monitoring: 




i 
Date | Time 


o 2 


LEL ■ Organic Vapor 




1 










I ! 1 








1 ! 

1 


1 ' 






1 






J 

il 

:i 


1 i 








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1 1 


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[III. 


Fire Protection 


1 


1 
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a. Fire extinguishers in place 


l | 
j (Initials) i 


1 
1 


b. Area clear or" other combustible 


j (Initials) 



i IV. Operations in compliance with OSHA regulations (Initials) 



Signature (Engineer) 



Dau 



riM:Hlv\l.Ttt/CUK2 , 'rOXM&'?&AMrLM 



( 



-"J J. COPIES OF PERMIT 
V1U. REMAIN AT JOB SITE 
UNTIL JOB IS COMPLETED 



CONFINED SPACE ENTRY PERMIT 
UAZARDOOS AREA ENTRY PERMIT 



LOCATION and DESCRIPTION 
of Confined Soa.ce 



PURPOSE of Entry 
DEPARTMENT 



Date 



PERSON in Charge of Work 





?J?=?,VXS0a (S) '-" Chars? of Crc--i 


1 


TYPE O r CREW 




n>. ^«. 








1 






1 


1 










i 

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«FCfA!. RFO"ToPM*vrS 


'YES I NO • 


i 


YES 


?io ! 




! oefc Out - Qe-«n«»r?'_?e 


! 


1 -scape Harness 1 


I 




Lines Broken - Opped or 51»»?»'<«»d 




• Tripod <="rr!er7«"cv »«Ky"p«; '£Si£t 






?tir?«> - F'ush pnd vent ,__ . 


1 


Im*>K?v» S 1 


I 


-> 


Venr i ' at ion 


1 1 


t~ire Ey*<n !f ...i f :'r. f ,r-sj ! 


1 ! 




So'."" Ar- e - 




|l.i ? -nfi-, ? I 


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^rMr'nin? ADDe-!-^-'-is 


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1 Protective Cln*»i<n9 1 


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R°suscit»tn-- - TpHai-tor 


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iR-soirator J 


i 



TEST(S) TO 3E TAKEN 





[Velid fpr one 8->»r turn sf.lv> 1 P.E.L. * lYES 


DATE DATE DATE DATE DATE DATE DATE DATE 
NO 1 Ml Ml Ml '"1 M 1 t! M | f. 


7. er 0-/ren 1 -19. « *?,'-,S 1 


1 1 1 1 1 lllj 


i o- '- .=■ '.. * Uo2 3 avgr 10 


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Vrvl. | ?S w 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 III 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ! 1 1 I I 



CVS TESTER 



Note: Continuous/per iccic tests she I L bo established before beginning Job. Any question:: pertain •..".5 
to test reauirer>;:its con;ec; o.-rtified division jes tester. Piant Geis Coordinator cr 

the industrial Kysienist 



VS. 
NO 

f 



laSJPJJMEhTSJJSi 



iZZrX. 



JX2C_ 



i'-vav*._i'.'i . 



ISAcEH standby, versos t sj_ 



AM DU LANCE 
FIRs. 



Supv . ais-Norising oLL 

above conditions satisfied 

* P.E.L. Permissible Entry Level 

* L.E.L. Lower Exclusion Level 



Ortg. to Deo-- 
Copy to Safety 






- 






ACCIDENT REPORT 



<7(_£Ai£ CKECX CO«Rf;CT COMfA.NYl 

O Sevenson Environmental Servicer 
Wf I n SCC Contracting 
D Sevcnson Industrial 



JOB NO. 



INJURED PERSON: 



SEX: 
M_ 

F 



AGE: 



MARTIAL STATUS: 

S 

M 



HOME ADDRESS: 



S.S. NO.: 



/ / 



DATE OF ACCIDENT: 



/ / 



TIME: AM 

PM 



DATE EMPLOYED: 



/ / 



JOB SUPERINTENDENT: 



HOURLY RATE: 



[NJURED'S JOB TITLE: 



•WAS INJURED PAID IN FULL FOR THIS DAY: 



DEFINE NATURE AND AREA OF 30DY INJURED: 

,"?"— — «uw ■— pfitf b od y 'imit/, 14. ng;* »--=« r. (>• C^r* *cv 1 



■DATE OF DISABILITY & nose, state sos 



/ / 



PR03ABLE LENGTH: 



DID YOU PROVIDE MEDICAL CAR 



NAME AND ADDRESS OF PHYSICIAN: 



NAME AND .ADDRESS OF HOSPITAL 



TYPE OF EMERGENCY ROOM TREATMENT: 



; | .ADMITTED TO HOSPITAL: YES NO. 



DID INJURED DIE: YES 



NO 



WHERE/WHAT W AS INJURED DOING WHEN ACCIDENT OCCURRED oe; 
! INJURED STATES THAT HE/SHE WAS: 



i NAME AND ADDRESS OF WITNESS: 



CORRECTIVE ACTION TAKEN: 



DA l E REPOR1 LD TO FOREMAN: 



/ / 



DATE SUBMITTED TO OFFICE: / 



I SUl'ERViSOR/COf.T CONTROL Cl.EKi; 



(Day after accident) 



DATE C-2 FILED: 



(Day after accident) 



MM .1 <£aCI ntuiZ-xuiW 5KCCB3C! i 



■.icsAium; 



ALL QUESTIONS MUST »K ANSWKRKO! 
TELEPHONE: 7i^2tu-<U3i 



. 



- 






APPENDIX D 
RESPIRATOR PROGRAM 



I* 



m 



<D 



RESPIRATORY PROTECTION PROGRAM 



m 



This respiratory protection program has been written to comply with the applicable CSHA 
regulations and contract specifications, to provide the basis for the administration of the 
respirator program, and to serve as a training tool for the affected workers. Specific" of the 
program such as brands of respirators used, cartridges or filters, and type oi monitoring 
equipment will be provided depending upon the specific tasks and hazards. 

Since respiratory protection, in many instances, will be the primary method for protecting a 
worker's health, it is Sevenson's policy that all portions of this program be followed and that 
any deficiencies in the administration and enforcement of this program will be immediately 
corrected. 

Tne overall responsibility for documenting and administering the respirator program rests with 
the Project Manager. This responsibility will be delegated to the Senior Site Safety Officer. 
The Site Safer/ Officer will be responsible for the purchasing, maintenance, cleaning, and 

"refresher" training of personnel on an annual basis. Tne Certified Industrial Hygtenist will be 

responsible for the preparation and evaluation of this program. 






( 



(. 



The type of respirators that will be used will be selected on ihc basis of cither legally mandated 
requirements or on the professional judgment of the Certified Industrial Hygienist. OSHA 
standard ID 10. 13-1 and the contract specifications arc explicit in the types of respirators that are 
permitted to be worn when contaminants are handled. Those requirements are based on the 
airborne concentration of the various types of contaminants. Since monitoring is a requirement 
of the OSHA standard and contract specifcations, sufficient data will be generated to determine 
the proper type o!" respiratory protection. The type of respirators to be worn will be chosen 
from the following types: 

1) Half mask air purifying equipped with high efficiency particulate, organic vapor, 
and acid gas cartridges. 

2) Full face air purifying equipped with high efficiency particulate, organic vapor, 
and acid gas cartridges. 

3) Powered air purifying respirator equipped with high efficiency particulate filters. 

4) Full face piece supplied-air respirator operated in the pressure demand mode. 

It is important that a worker understands the proper use and limitations of '.he v<ua. .:. 
respirators. Therefore, all workers who are required to wear respirators will undergo a 'raining 
program that consists of: 



1) Nature o: the hazards 

2) Explanation of why other control methods arc not feasible 

S) F.xuianaiion of the selection criteria for the respirators that are to be used 



( 



4) Limitations 

5) Inspection 

6) Proper donning and wearing 

7) Positive and negative pressure fit tests 

8) Maintenance 

9) Emergency situations 

In addition, all respirator users vvili be given a qualitative fit test. 

Ail respirators will be cieaned and disinfected at the end of each day's use. The following 
procedure will be used: 

1) Cartridges, filters, and canisters will be removed and discarded. 

2) Wash respirator in warm water (approx. 120°F) and cleaner/disinfectant solution. 

3) Rinse in clean, warm water and then in a 50% isopropyl alcohol solution. 

4) Air dry or use a hair dryer. 

5) Inspect all parts o: respirator and replace any that are missing or defective 

6) Place facepiece in plastic bag. 

7) Immediately betorc u^c insert new cartridges. 

All respirators will be stored in a separate plastic bag and stored in the decontamination 

It will be die responsibility of the site safety officer to assure diat all respirators have heen 
properly inspected and maintained. 

The ms;>ection will con.si.sl of: 



1) Tightness of connections. 

2) condition of facepieoe, straps, connecting lubes, and canisters. 

3) Condition of exhalation and inhalation valves. 

4) Pliability and flexibility of rubber parts. 

5) Condition of lenses of full facepiece respirators. 

6) Charge of compressed air cylinder of self contained breathing apparatus. 

7) Proper functioning of regulators and warning devices. 

As outlined in the air monitoring section of the health and safety plan, personal air samples will 
be taken to determine the extent of worker exposure. The results of this sampling will be 
reviewed and evaluated and the proper type of respiratory protection will then be determined by 
tine CIH. 

As the work progresses, the type and extent of the health hazards will become more fully 
documented. Also there is the potential for the development of new hazards. Therefore, this 

respiratory protection program will be continually evaluated by the on-site safer/ and health 

personnel in consultation with the CIH. 

All personnel who will be required to wear respirators must participate in the medical 
surveillance program outlined in the health and safety plan. A certificate stating that trie 
employee is physically able to wear a respirator will be obtained and made available to th: 
owner's representative. 



< 



All respiratory protective equipment used on this project will be approved by the National 
Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. 

Air Supplied Breathing Apparatus Standards contains specific requirements for supplied air 
systems. 



RESPIRATOR FIT 



• 



An employee wearing a respirator can be protected against airborne contaminants only if there 
is successful scaling of the respirator on his or her face. All employees may not obtain a 
successful fit for a specific respirator, since facial dimensions vary considerably from person to 
person. A half facepiece must contact a rather complex facial surface and the possibility of 
leakage is greater than in the case of the full facepiece. Studies have shown that temples on 
glasses, absence of dentures, full beards, handlebar mustaches or wide sideburns can reduce 
respirator performance by as much as 25 percent. 

Tne respirator facepiece-to-face seal shall be tested each time the employee dons the respirator. 
Most respirator manufacturers provide instructions for wearing and leal-; testing and these 
instructions shall be followed. Tne training program will cover these procedures. Facepleee- : .o- 
face fit tests include the following: 

A. Positive Pressure Test - close or "block off the exhalation valve and exhale 
gen'.'.y into the facepiece. If a slight positive pressure is built up with no apparent 
outward leakage around the seal, then the facepiece-to-face seal is satisfactory. 
Note '.hat this test only applies to those respirators which 'nave an exhalation valve 
which can be blocked (the exhalation valve cover may have to be removed for the 
test). 



& 



Negative Pressure Test - Close the inlet opening or hose of the respirator 
facepiecc with the hand(s), tape or other means, inhale gently so that the 
facepiecc collapses slightly and hole' the breath for ten !>econds. If the facepiecc 
remains slightly collapsed and no inward leakage occurs, then the facepicce-to- 
face seal is probably satisfactory. 

The respirator fit test wili be performed according to the Qualitative Fit Test 
(QLFT) protocols as outlined in Appendix D of OSHA Standard 1910.! 0?5 , 
which is detailed below. Positive and negative pressure tests y/ili be performed 
by the employee before t2.ch wearing of his respirator. 

Tne isoamyl acetate protocol is as follows: 
a. Odor Threshold Screening 



Three L-Liter glass jars with metal lids (e.g. iyiascm oi he'., j«.uj; aic 

required. 

Odor-free water (e.g. distilled or spring water) •.-.! ■ 

shall be used for the solutions. 

The isoamyl acetate (IAA) (also known as isopentyl acetate) stock solution 

is prepared by adding I cc of pure IAA to 800 cc of odor-free water in a 

1 -liter jar and shaking for 30 seconds. This solution shall be prepared 

new at least weekly. 

The screening test shall be conducted in a room separate from the room 

used for actual fit testing. The two rooms shall be well ventilated \y.ii .•• : <v. 

not be connected to the same recirculating ventilation system. 



r 



r 



- 



5. The odor test solution is prepared in a second jar by placing 0.4 cc of the 
stock solution into 500 cc of odor-free water using a clean dropper or 
pipette. Shake for 30 seconds and allow to stand for two to three minutes 
so that the IAA concentration above the liquid may reach equilibrium. 
This solution may be used for only one day. 

6. A test blank is prepared in a third jar by adding 500 cc of odor-free 
water. 

7. The odor test and test blank jars shall be labelled 1 and 2 for jar 
identification. If the labels are put on the lids they can be periodically 
dried off and switched to avoid people thinking the same jar always has 
the IAA. 

S. Tr.e following instructions shall be typed on a card and placed on the cable 
in front o: me two test jars (i.e. 1 and 2); 

"The purpose of this test is to determine if you can smell banana 
oil at a low concentration. Tne two bottles in front of you contain 
water. One of these bottles also contains a small amount of 
banana oil. Be sure the covers are on tight, then shake each bcvlt 
for two seconds. Unscrew the Lid of each bottle, one a: a time, 
and sniff at the mouth of the bottle. Indicate to the test r.onc - -'.c.:o' 
which bottle contains banana oil." 

9. The mixtures used in the IAA odor detection test shall be prepared in. ■•• 

area separate from where the test is performed, in order to prev-jr.: 

olfactory fatigue in the subject. 
iO. If the test subject is unable to correctly identify the jar containing the odor 

test solution, the LA A QLFT may not be used. 
il. If the test subject correctly identifies the jar containing the odor tes: 

solution, he may proceed to respirator selection and fit testing. 



r 



c 






• 



Respirator Selection 

1. The test subject shall be allowed to select the most comfortable respirator 
from a large array of various sizes and manufacturers that include at least 
three sizes of elastomeric half facepieces and units of at least two 
manufacturers. 

2. The selection process shall be conducted in a room separate from where 
the fit test will take place. 

3. The test subject should understand that he is being asked to select the 
respirator which provides the most comfortable fit for him. Each 
respixaior represents a different size and shape and, if fit properly, will 
provide adequate protection. 

4. The test subject holds each facepiece up to his face and eliminates those 
which axe obviously not giving a comfortable fit. Normally, selection wiii 
begin with a half-facepiece and if a fit cannot be found here, the subject 
will be asked to go to the full face piece respirators. (A small percentage 
of users will not be able to weax any half-facepiece respirator). 

5. Tne more comfortable face pieces axe recorded; the most comfortable 
mask is donned and worn at least five minutes to assess comfort. 
Assistance in assessing comfort can be given by discussing the points :r. 
#6 below. If the test subject is not familiar with using a particular 
respirator, he shaii be directed to don the mask several times and to adjust 
the straps each time, so that he becomes adept at setting proper tension on 
the stxaps. 

■':. Assessment of comfort shall include reviewing the following points with 
the test subject: 

Chin properly placed 
Positioning of mask on nose 
Strap tension 
• Fit across nose bridge 



r 



r 






• 



Room for safety glasses 
Distance from nose to chin 
Room to talk 
Tendency to slip 
Cheeks filled out 
Self-observation in mirror 



Adequate time for assessment 



7. The test subject shall conduct the conventional negative and positive 
pressure fit checks (e.g. see ANSI 288.2-1980). Before conducting the 
negative or positive-pressure checks, the subject shali be told to "seat" his 
mask by rapidly moving the head side-to-side and up and down, taking a 
few deep breaths. 

8. Tne test subject is now ready for fit testing. 

9. After passing the fit test, the test subject shall be questioned again 
regarding the comfort of the respirator. If it has become uncomfortable, 
another model of respirator shall be tried. 

10. The employee shall be given the opportunity to select a different facspiece 
and be retested if during the first two weeks of on-the-job wear the chosen 
facepiece becomes unacceptably uncomfortable. 



c. 



Fit Test 



The fit test chamber shali be substantially similar to a clear 55 gallon 
drum liner suspended inverted over a two foot diameter frame, so thai the 
top of chamber is about six inches above the test subject's head. Tne 
inside top center of the chamber shall have a small hook attached. 
Each respirator used for the fitting and fit testing shall be equipped with 
organic vapor cartridges to offer protection against organic vapors Tne 
cartridges or masks shall be changed at leas*, weekly. 



10 



3. After selecting, donning, and properly adjusting a respirator himself, the 
test subject shall wear it t.c the fit testing room. This room shall be 
separate from the room used for odor threshold screening and respirator 
selection, and shall be well ventilated, as by an exhaust fan or lab hook, 
to prevent general room contamination. 

4. A copy of the following test exercises and rainbow (or equally effective) 
passage shall be taped to the inside of the test chamber: 

Test Exercises 

i. Normal breathing. 

iii. Turning head from side-to-side. Be certain movement is complete. Alert 
the test subject not to bump the respirator on the shoulders. Have the test 
subject inhale when his head is at either side, 
iv. Nodding head up and down. Be certain morions arc complete and made 
about every second. Alert the test subject not to bump the respirator on 
the chest. Have the test subject inhale when his head is in the fully up 
position. 
v. Talking. Talk aloud and slowly for several minutes. Tne following 
paragraph is called the Rainbow Passage. Reading it will result In a wide 
range of facial movements, and thus be usefui to satisfy this requirement. 

Rainbow Passage 

When the sunlight strikes raindrops in the air, they act like a p~s;\\ and 
form a rainbow. The rainbow is a division of white light into many 
beautiful colors. These take the shape of a long round arch, with its path 
high above, and its two ends apparendy beyond the horizon. Tnere is, 
according to legend, a boiling pot of gold at one end. People look, b'»» 



11 



no one ever finds it. When a man looks for something beyond reach, his 
friends say he is looking for the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. 
vi. Normal breaming. 

5. Each test subject shall wear his respirator for at least ten minutes before 
starting the fit Lest. 

6. Upon entering the test chamber, the test subject shall be given ?. six inch 
by five inch piece of paper towel or oiher porous absorbent single ply 
material, folded in naif and wetted with three-quarters of one cc of pure 
IAA. The test subject shall hang the wet towel on the hook at the top of 
the chamber. 

7. Allow two minutes for the IAA test concentration to be reached before 
starting the fii-test exercises. Tnis would be an appropriate rime to talk 
with the test subject, to explain the fit test, the importance of his 
cooperation, me purpose for the head exercises, or to demonstrate some 
of the exercises. 

8. Each exercise described in No. 4 above shall be performed for at leas: one 
minute. 

9. If at any time during the test, the subject detects the banana-like odor of 
IAA, he snail quickly exit from the test chamber and leave the test area 
to avoid olfactory fatigue. 

10. Upon returning to the selection room, the subject shall remove 0v„ 
respirator, repeat the odor sensitivity test, select and put on another 
respirator, return to the test chamber, etc. The process continues untii a 
respirator that fits well has been found. Should the odor sensitivity test 
be failed, the subject shall wait about five minutes before retesting. Odor 
sensitivity will usually have returned by this time. 

11. If a person cannot be fitted with the selection of half-facepiece respirators, 
include full faceniece models in the selection process. 



m 



12. When the test subject leaves the chamber he shall remove the saturated 
towel, returning it to the conductor. To keep the area from becoming 
contaminated, the used towels shall be kept in a self-sealing bag. There 
should be no significant IAA concentration buildup in the test chamber 
from subsequent tests. 

13. Persons who have successfully passed this fit test may be assigned the use 
of the tested respirator in atmospheres with up to ten times the PEL of 
airborne lead. In other works this IAA protocol may be used to assign a 
protection factor no higher than ten. 



13 



Am SUPPLTTD KKFATHTNG APPARATUS STANDARDS 



Brcalhing air shall be of high purity such that toxic compounds (particulate, vapor, or gas) are 
not present in sufficient concentration to threaten the health and safety of the user. 

OSHA regulations, as a minimum, require that breathing air meet Grade D specifications as 
described and determined by analytical methods (or equivalent) in Compressed Gas Association 
(CGA) Commodity Specifi cations G-7. 1-1973. The specifications for Grade D breathing air are: 



Grade D 


| Carbon Monoxide 


<20 ppm 


Carbon Dioxide 


< 1000 ppm | 


Oxygen 


19-23% j 


Oil Mist 


<5 mg/M3 i 


Odor 


j| 
Free from pronounced odor 



Although Grade D specifications allow measurable concentrations of carbon monoxide., yv 
carbon monoxide above normal atmospheric levels indicates a "problem" with the cotnpre:>i;« 
air supply equipment or procedures and should be investigated. 

Breathing air may be supplied from cylinders, blowers or compressors. 



14 



I. Breathing Air Cylinders 

A. Request suppliers to certify in writing that air purity meets CGA commodity 

Specifications G-7. 1-1973 for Grade D breathing air. Compressed breathing air 
cylindcrs shall be clearly labeled as such and certifications should be provided 
pertaining to the quality of the supplied air. 

B. Determine whether supplier compresses ambient air or manufactures synthetic air 
from nitrogen and oxygen. Check every compressed ambient air cylinder for 
carbon monoxide, and every synthetic air cylinder for oxygen since local 
suppliers may or may not comply with cylinder preparation or quality verification 
requirements of CGA Commodity Specification G-7. 1-1973. This check wiii be 
done using a combination carbon monoxide/02 meter (Neotonics 55) and by 
collecting the air in a mylar sampling bag. 

C. Return to the supplier compressed breathing air found to have oxygen deficiency, 
carbon monoxide contamination, pronounced odor or distinct taste. 

H. Breathing Air Blower Svstem.s 

Locate the hand-operated blower intake in an area free from air contaminants and upwind 
c:" potential sources of contamination. 

HI. Breathing Air Compressor Systems 

Location 

The compressor intake shall be located in a clearly identified area free from air 
contaminants. The site supervisor shall be notified of non-routine activities which 
may affect the air quality of the breathing air compressor system. 



15 



B. General Requirements 

. • 1. Install temperature rise alarm to indicate compressor malfunction resulting 

in over-heating. Locate the sensor for the high temperature alarm at the 
outlet of the compressor before the storage chamber and set to activate at 
temperature specified by manufacturer. This is a precaution against 
exposure to toxic thermal decomposition products of the oil, lubricant, or 
lubricating device. 

2. Use suitable in-line purifying sorbent beds and filters to assure breathing 
air quality. Tne purifier unit must be capable of removing all hazardous 
contaminants (particles, carbon monoxide, oil mist, etc.). 

3. Inspect and maintain breathing air compressor systems. Check condition 
of friction rings, lubricant consumption, cooling jackets, purifier units, 
and other components in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. 

C. Type of Compressor 

1. Use of breathing air type (water or Teflon-lubricated) compressor. 

2. Do the following if an oil or synthetic-lubricated compressor must be • :' xl 
since thermal decomposition can produce carbon monoxide in Lhc; 
breathing air supply. 

a. Use compressed air purifier designed to remove lubricants, mist, 
and carbon monoxide. 

b. Test the rnmnresvd air for carbon monoxirtr. at intc.rvnk r<f nn l«« 
often than every SO hours of operation. While continuous carbon 

16 



monoxide alarms are available, their use is not recommended 
because of excessive calibration and maintenance requirements. 



D. Source of Power 

1. Use electric motors in preference to gasoline or diesel engines, since this 



source does not generate air contaminants. 



Use diesel in preference to gasoline engines, since gasoline engines are 
more likely to produce significant quantities of carbon monoxide. 

Equip engine with extensions for exhaust stack, crankcase vents and 
compressor intake and check carefully for exhaust manifold leakage. 



::\iOiAL-n;\co;<r>juisi'[RAT 



17 



APPENDIX E 
LEAD PROTECTION PROGRAM 



<=> 



APPENDIX E: 



Lead Control Program 



Pa°e 1 



Parts of the lead control program have been addressed in die Site Specific Health and Safety Plan. The 
following is a listing of the requirements of 1926.62 and a summary of Sevenson's program to control 
employee exposure to lead: 

(a) ACRON Levei 30 jtg/m 5 

(b) PekmiSSIULE Exposure Limit 50 /ig/m 3 

(c) COMPLIANCE. To control exposures to lead, bodi work practice and personal protective 
equipment controls will be implemented. The work practices include misting of the 
excavation and slower excavation rates, if necessary. Personal protective equipment is 
Level C protection as stated in Health and Safety Plan. 

(d) Respiratory Protection - Level C - Full-face With HEPA Filters. Follow 
procedures listed in Appendix D for respiratory program, and all employees will be certified 
by a physician as to Uieir ability to wear a respirator. 

(e) Protective Work Clothing and Equipment. If PEL is exceeded, Level C protection 
will be implemented. 

(f) HOUSEKEEPING. Site will be kept in a neat and orderly manner. Dust generation will be 
kept to a minimum. 

(g) Hygiene Facilities and Practices. Facilities will be made available for washing of 
hands and face prior to eating, taking a break, or leaving the site. If airborne levels of dust 
exceed the action level, then disposable protective coveralls will be worn. 

(h) Medical Surveillance. Sevenson employees participate in a medical surveillance 
program supervised by board-certified occupational health physicians affiliated with ihe 
Thomas Jefferson School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. As such, they re; ■'.:•. . 
a yearly physical which is outlined in Section 9.0 of the plan. Blood lead levels and zinc 
protoporphyrin are elements of the program. 

(i) Medical REMOVAL-PROTECTION. If employee blood lead levels reach those that 
necessitate employee removal from the job, Sev-nson will comply with the requirements of 
the standard. 



(j) Employee Information and Training. As part of their initial training, Sevenson 
employees receive, at a minimum. 40 hours of safety and health training. The site specific 
and h;izard communication training fur this project will fulfil ih<* requirements for iead 
specific training. 

(k) SlGNS. Regulated areas wilt be established and signs will be posted as warning of possible 
lead hazards. 









< 



APPENDIX E: Lead Control Program 



Page 2 



(1) RECORDS. All records are kept for 30 years. 

(m) Observation of Monitoring. Personal air monitoring will be conducted, and all 
employees will be advised of it, its purposes, and the results of such monitoring. 



• 



> 



• 



7.0 LEAD PROCESSING AND DISPOSITION PLAN 

Residual material produced by the physical screening process will include 
those materials passing the 2-inch screen mesh but not the No. 4 screen. These 
materials have been previously referred to as retained or recovered materials. It 
is anticipated that this retained material will be composed of bullets, bullet 
fragments, stones, and other assorted debris. The lead and copper alloy content 
of this residual makes it a good candidate for reuse through off-site recycling. 

The storage, characterization, and ultimate disposition of the residual will 
be managed by the Massachusetts Army National Guard (MANG) Hazardous 
Waste Manager (Mr. Sean Devine). 

As excavated berm material is processed by the screening plant, 
materials retained on No. 4 screen will be containerized in (a) super sacks or 
bulk bags, (b) roll off containers, or (c) stored uncontainerized on high quality 
poly surrounded by Jersey barriers and covered with poly. These retained 
materials will be managed by the MANG and storage is intended to be on a 
paved area. 

The MANG may contract for secondary separation of the recovered bullet 
fragments to remove non-metal components (rocks, wood, other debris) 
depending upon the composition of the retained material. This secondary 
separation would be conducted to increase the potential recycling cost recovery 
by increasing the percentage of bullet fragments in the materials shipped off-site 
for recycling. Material separated from the recyclable bullet fragments would then 
be returned to the central processing area for processing. 

The MANG will contract for the transportation of the recovered lead 
fragments to an EPA approved recycling facility. Currently the MANG is in 

Page 7 - 1 






( 






discussions with American Waste Transport & Recycling, Inc. in New Jersey. 
American Waste is partnered with the Exide Corporation and all of the 
recoverable lead would be utilized in the manufacturing of batteries. 

During pre-excavation berm sampling efforts, a representative sample of 
the anticipated residual material will be provided to the MANG for use in their 
discussions with American Waste. 

The excavated berm materials that pass through both the 2-inch screen 
and the No. 4 screen will be subjected to the ex-situ MAECTITE process as 
discussed in Section 2.5. These processed materials will be returned to the 
small arms firing ranges for future berm reconstruction. 



Page 7 - 2 



8.0 INTERFACE AND DATA SHARING PLAN 

All field documentation and deliverable documents will be managed 
electronically to the extent possible to facilitate client/agency requirements. 
Documents incorporated into this system will be available as platform 
independent electronic documents as well as hard copy. Ogden and Sevenson 
will work with office and field personnel to establish the necessary protocols for 
document exchange. 

Progress reports will be generated from a project management database 
using industry standard software and protocols. Project scheduling data will be 
closely tied to other project data and information resources to meet project 
requirements and ensure compatibility. 

Information exchange between operatives will be critical throughout the 
life of this project to meet the rigorous reporting requirements and short lead- 
times. Adequate connectivity will be ensured by working cooperatively with all 
parties to facilitate efficient, secure information/data exchange. E-mail, client- 
server applications, customized front-end interfaces, FAX modems, and Digital 
Paper™ will be used to the extent necessary to meet these demands. 

A systematic process to evaluate and validate the data for this project is 
outlined in the site-specific QA/QC plan. This data validation process will consist 

Page 8 - 1 



of the use of acceptable criteria to provide assurance that the data are adequate 
for their intended use. The process will involve data editing, screening, checking, 
auditing, verification, flagging, certification and review. The data review and 
validation will be conducted independent of the laboratory conducting the 
analyses. 

Database structures will conform to AFCEE's (The Air Force Center for 
Environmental Excellence) IRPIMS (Installation Restoration Program Information 
Management System) version 3 format to ensure data compatibility with AFCEE 
and with other contractors/sub-contractors providing data to the MMR. All of the 
agencies/operatives who are expected to generate data/information for any of the 
required data deliverables will be contacted to coordinate information exchange 
and compliance to standards. 



Page 8 - 2 



I 



• 



• 



( 



• 
• 


ID 


Name 


Duration 


3Q97 


4Q97 


1Q98 


2Q98 


3Q98 




Aug | Sep 


Oct Nov | Dec 


Jan | Feb Mar 


Apr | May | Jun 


Jul Auq | Sep 


1 


Work Plan Development 

Project Initiation 

Prepare Draft Plans 

Submit Draft Plans 

EPA/DEP/Public Review 

Meeting 

Response to Comments 

Meeting 

Conditional Approval 

Prepare Final Plans 

Submit Final Plans 

EPA Authorization to Proi 
Determine Surface Areas of I 
Mobilization at MMR 

Sampling Activities 

Excavation Equipment 

Treatment Equipment 
Pre-excavation Sampling 
Excavation of Berms 

Range A 

Range B 

Range C 

Range D 

Range E 

Range G 

Range H 

Range I 

Range J 

Range K 

Range KD 

Range N 

Range 

Range P 

Range SE 

Range SW 
Treatment of Berm Soils 
Berm Reconstruction 

Range B 

Range C 


103d 

Od 

5d 

Od 

29d 

Id 

Id 

1d 

Id 

13d 

Od 

Od 

5d 

1 1d 

5d 

5d 

10d 

18d 

93d 

12d 

15d 

6d 

Ad 

14d 

7d 

10d 

7d 

7d 

11 d 

12d 

7d 

5d 

7d 

4.5d 

4.5d 

97d 

10d 

5d 

5d 








1 
♦ 




2 


] 
♦ 

D 
Q 
□ 


3 


A 


5 


■ 


1 
1 
1 

1 

c 
w 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


22 








23 


W 


29 


35 


41 


Al 


53 


59 


65 


71 


77 


83 


89 


95 


101 


107 


113 


119 








122 


D 
D 


123 


MA 


fl H 








Project MMR Lead Removal 
Date: 1/8/98 


Cntica 
Noncr 






Pruyr 


one ♦ Rolled Up O 


▼ 


tical | Miles 




Page 1 



ID 



Name 



Duration 



3Q97 
Aug 1 Sep 



4Q97 



Oct 1 Nov | Dec 



1Q98 
Jan I Feb I Mar 



2Q98 
Apr I May I Jun 



3Q98 
Jul | Aug | Sep 



125 



128 



132 



149 



150 



151 



152 



153 



154 



155 



156 



157 



158 



159 



160 



161 



162 



163 



164 



165 



166 



Equipment Decontamination 5d 

Demobilization from MMR lid 

Meetings and Briefings 1 06d 

Reports 248d 

Daily Production Reports 119d 

Progress Report 1 Od 

Progress Report 2 Od 

Progress Report 3 Od 

Progress Report 4 Od 

Progress Report 5 Od 

Progress Report 6 Od 

Progress Report 7 Od 

Progress Report 8 Od 

Progress Report 9 Od 

Progress Report 10 Od 

Progress Report 11 Od 

Draft Completion of Work 21 d 

Submit Draft Report Od 

Review Draft Report lid 

Final Completion of Work 1 2d 



□ 



□ 



Project: MMR Lead Removal 
Date 1/8/98 



Critical 
Noncntical 



Progress ■■ 
Milestone ♦ 



Summary ^F 
Rolled Up O 



Page 2 






( 



# 



. 



10.0 DAILY PRODUCTION REPORT PLAN 

A Daily Production Report will be completed by the Project Superintendent by 9:00 
am the following day and delivered to NGB for distribution. The Daily Production Report 
will include: 



Production quantities for the various activities 

A list of personnel on site 

Problems encountered 

Corrective actions taken 

Schedule status 

Treatment system calibration 

Analytical data provided to NGB 

List of other items which occurred during work day 



A copy of the daily production report is included in this section. 



Page 10- 1 



• 



DATE: 

Page: 1 of 3 



SEVENSON ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES, INC. 
DAILY PRODUCTION REPORT 



MASSACHUSETTS MILITARY RESERVATION 



SEVENSON ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES, INC. JOB NUMBER: 



PRODUCTION QUANTITIES: 

Total Raw Material Processed 
Total Amount of MAECTITE® Used 
Total Amount of Treated Material 

PERSONNEL ON SITE: 

Site Superintendent: 

Project Chemist: 

Treatment Foreman: 

Operators: 

Laborers: 

Health and Safety Officer: 



DAILY CUMULATIVE 



Initials: (Sevenson) (Client) 



DATE: 

Page: 2 of 3 



DAILY PRODUCTION REPORT (CONTINUED) 



PROBLEMS ENCOUNTERED: 



CORRECTIVE ACTION: 



SCHEDULE STATUS: 



TREATMENT SYSTEM CALIBRATION: 



ANALYTICAL DATA PROVIDED TO CLIENT (list sample numbers) 



Initials: (Sevenson) (Client) 



DATE: 

Page: 3 of 3. 

DAILY PRODUCTION REPORT (CONTINUED) 



OTHER ITEMS: 



Sevenson Environmental Services, Inc. 

Site Supervisor Signature (Date) 

Client 

Signature (Date) 



v 






J 






. 






<b 



Sevenson 
Environmental 
Services, Inc. 



July 1, 1997 



LTC Mike Weaver 

ANGRC/ILNE-E 

1 1 1 South George Mason Dr. 

Arlington, VA 22204 



RE: MAECTITE® Treatability Results on Lead in Shooting Range Soil 
Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR) / Otis AFB 



LTC Weaver: 

Sevenson Environmental Services, Inc. has completed the bench-scale MAECTITE® treatability 
jtudy on sample material provided from the above referenced facility. As supported by the 
following data, the MAECTITE® chemical treatment process is capable of treating the material to 
well below the RCRA threshold TCLP limit of 5.0mg/l for lead. After material characterization 
data was received, Sevenson examined its existent data base and prepared treatment designs for 
application. The sample we obtained was typical of shooting range soils we have examined for total 
lead as well as TCLP lead. The following results demonstrate a 99.8% reduction in leachability of 
lead. 



Sample 
Description 


Total Pb 
(mg/kg) 


TCLP Pb 

(mg/1) 


% Leachability 
Reduction 


Sieved/Untreated 


28,850 


208.0 


— 


Sieved/Treated 


Not Analyzed 


0.438 


99.8% 



A copy of the laboratory report is attached for your information. All data was generated in 
accordance with approved EPA SW-846 methodology utilizing EPA QA Level II data validation 
protocol. Total lead was not analyzed in the treated material in order to expedite the study. This 
test plus another treatment run to optimize MAECTITE® process chemistry may be conducted. 

Should you have any questions, please do not hesitate to call me at (219) 836-01 16 in Munster, 
Indiana. 

Very Truly Yours, 

Sevenson Environmental Services, Inc. 




Chris Rice 

Director of Treatment Services 



cc: 



M. Lock 



9245 Calumet Ave. Suite 101 Munster. Indiana 46321 
An Equal Opportunity Employer 



(219) 836-0116 



••.. ' 



( 






WASTE STREAM TECHNOLOGY, INC. 

302 Grote Street 

Buffalo. NY 14207 

(716)876-5290 



Analytical Data Report 

Report Date : 07/01/97 
Group Number : 9705-100 

Prepared For : 

Mr. Chris Rice 

Sevenson Environmental Services, Inc. 

9245 Calumet Avenue 

Suite 101 

Munster, IN 46321 

Site : MMR-Otis AF8 



J 





Field and Laboratory Information 






Client Id 


WST Lab # 


Matrix 


Date Sampled 


Date Received 


Time 


Initial-Screened Untreated 


WS34517 


Soil 


06/23/97 


06/23/97 


1200 


Sample Status Upon Receipt : No irregularities. 



Analytical Parameters 
TCLP Lead 
Total Lead 



Analytical Services 
Number of Samples 

1 

1 



Turnaround Time 

5 Business Days 
5 Business Days 



Report Released By :. 



Qo~^> (J- VU* 



Daniel Vollmer. Laboratory QA/QC Officer 



ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY ACCREDITATION CERTIFICATION NUMBERS 
NYSDOH ELAP #11179 NJDEPE #73977 CDHS ELAP #2189 



utfSTTsn&rn 



{ 






Waste Stream Technology, Inc. 
Metals Analysis Result Report 



) 



Site: MMR-OtisAFB 
Date Sampled: 06/23/97 
Date Received: 06/23/97 



Group Number: 9705-100 
Report Units. mg/Kg 
Matrix: Soil 





Lab ID Number 
Client ID 
Date Digested 


WS34617 

INITAL-SCREENED UNTREATED 

06/25/97 




Analyte 


Detection 
Limit 


Result 


Date 
Analyzed 


Analysis 
Method 


Lead by ICP 


12 


28850 


06/26/97 


SW-846 6010 



D 



UJdSTE STKjrr) 



Waste Stream Technology, Inc. 

TCLP Metals Analysis Result Report 



Site: MMR - Otis AFB 
Date Sampled: 06/23/97 
Date Received: 06/23/97 



Group Number: 9705-100 
Report Units: mg/L 
Matrix: TCLP Extract 

TCLP Extraction Date: 06/24/97 





Lab ID Number: 

Client ID: 
Date Digested: 


WS34617 

INITAL-SCREENED UNTREATED 

06/25/97 




Analyte 


Detection 
Limit 


Result 


Date 
Analyzed 


Analysis 
Method 


Lead by ICP 


0.120 


208.000 


06/25/97 


SW-846 6010 



UMSTESTOdCTl 



WASTE STREAM TECHNOLOGY, INC. 

302 Grote Street 

Buffalo, NY 14207 

(716)876-5290 

Analytical Data Report 

Report Date: 07/01/97 
Group Number : 9705-105 

Prepared For : 

Mr. Chris Rice 

Sevenson Environmental Services, Inc. 

9245 Calumet Avenue 

Suite 101 

Munster, IN 46321 

Site: MMR-OtisAFB 



Field and Laboratory Information 



Client Id 



WST Lab # 



Matrix 



Date Sampled 



Date Received 



Time 



SIEVED -TREATED 



WS34770 



Soi 



06/30/97 



06/30/97 



0900 



Sample Status Upon Receipt : No irregularities. 



Analytical Parameters 

TCLP Lead 



Analytical Services 
Number of Samples 

1 



Turnaround Time 

2 Business Days 



Report Released 



Bv: RwP 0- V* 



Daniel Vollmer, Laboratory QA/QC Officer 



ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY ACCREDITATION CERTIFICATION NUMBERS 
NYSDOH ELAP #11179 NJDEPE #73977 CDHS ELAP #2189 



OWSTE STREdTfl 



Waste Stream Technology, Inc. 

TCLP Metals Analysis Result Report 



Site: MMR - Otis AFB 
Date Sampled: 06/30/97 
Date Received: 08/30/97 



Group Number: 9705-105 
Report Units: mg/L 
Matrix: TCLP Extract 

TCLP Extraction Date. 06/30/97 





Lab ID Number: 

Client ID: 
Date Digested: 


WS34770 

SIEVED - TREATED 

07/01/97 




Analyte 


Detection 
Limit 


Result 


Date 
Analyzed 


Analysis 
Method 


Lead by ICP 


0.120 


0.438 


07/01/97 


SW-846 6010 



IUJSTE STR£dm 



JONATHAN BOUWIEJ gj^ffi|BM|| 

0113 0067651 1 






For Reference 

Not to be taken from this room 



Jonathan Bourne Public Library 

19 Sandwich Rd. 

Bourn*. MA 02532 






— — --fl^^^i